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Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Psychological

Psychological Effects of Chronic Pain

The fact of the matter is that chronic pain wears on you. It’s difficult to bear not only physically, but mentally. Since more than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, the psychological effects of pervasive pain are far reaching in our society. Understanding the psychological issues that accompany chronic pain is important for pain specialists and patients alike.

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’s five stages of grief have been used to break down and describe the experiences of people when they are grieving, giving a name and potentially helping people cope with feelings that seem all-powerful when you’re experiencing them. Chronic pain, both the diagnosis and experience, presents similar emotional upheaval. One PsyD, a Doctor Jennifer Martin, created the ‘7 stages of Chronic Pain and Illness’ to offer pain sufferers and physicians with a similar delineation. It’s important to remember that a person may experience these stages out of order or may circle back to an earlier stage. She describes them as follows:

Denial

When people realize that their pain may not be going away, it’s tough to swallow. They often experience shock and denial, which may prevent them from seeking out the help that they need to obtain proper treatment.

Pleading, Bargaining, and Desperation

Patients in this stage look for anything that may fix their condition or act as a bandage. They often bargain, either with themselves or a God, to make it better, all the while blaming themselves and experiencing tremendous guilt.

Anger

Once people understand that there’s no magical fix for their condition, they often experience anger. They may be mad at anyone related to their condition, including family, friends, care providers, employers, and anyone else they can tie their decline to.

Anxiety and Depression

Living with chronic pain can be scary and may bring on anxiety. It may also lead to depression. This occurs when a person feels hopeless, exhausted, and experience intense grief. This depression isn’t necessarily a mental illness, but an appropriate reaction to this type of change.

Loss of Self and Confusion

Chronic pain may lead to patients losing an integral part of their life. They may not be able to do the things they once did any longer, which can lead to an identity crisis of sorts.

Reevaluation of Life, Roles, and Goals

At this stage, people begin to come to terms with potential limitations and life changes. They begin to find a way to live their life within their new normal. Changing expectations of what things should be can help chronic pain patients find happiness despite their condition.

Acceptance

This doesn’t necessarily mean being alright with the way things are now. It simply means they’ve accepted the reality of their condition and are taking steps to live within that reality. It means choosing to move forward despite chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Treatment, Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy, Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Facts About Neuropathy Symptoms

Neuropathy occurs when there is a problem with the peripheral nerves, which are responsible for transporting signals from the central nervous system to the rest of the body. Symptoms may vary depending on what nerve is affected. Here are some common symptoms.

1. Numbness or tingling

Body numbing or tingling may occur when there is neuropathy or pain in a localized area of the body. It occurs when nerves that carry sensation messages (touch, pain, temperature) do not perform correctly.

2. Localized pain

Localized pain is caused when there are sharp or shooting pains that occur randomly in the body (especially in the legs). It may even occur from something as simple as a light touch.

3. Imbalance

People with peripheral neuropathy may lose their balance. It occurs when tissues in the body deploy receptors called proprioceptors to respond to stimuli. Loss of balance happens when these receptors become affected by neuropathy.

4. Abnormal walking gait

Neuropathy pain may cause people to develop an abnormal gait due to the dysfunction of the motor or sensory nerves. Symptoms may include dragging feet, a stooping walk or a lopsided shuffle when walking.

5. Muscle cramping

Peripheral neuropathy may cause dysfunction to motor nerves, which results in muscle cramps even with the slightest exertion, such as during daily activities.

6. Muscle weakness

Muscle weakness may occur along with muscle cramping. It occurs when patients have a hard time performing small movements that require precision, such as buttoning a shirt or picking up an object.

7. Gastrointestinal disorders

Digestive disorders may occur when neuropathy affects the autonomic nerves in the body, which control involuntary actions. Symptoms may include bloating, flatulence, constipation, and heartburn.

8. Low blood pressure

Autonomic nerves also control blood pressure. When neuropathy occurs, it may cause the affected person to develop hypertension. Symptoms may include blurred vision, fainting, dizziness, heart palpations, and fatigue.

9. Bell’s Palsy

In some cases of neuropathy, a very specific nerve may be affected. Bell’s Palsy may occur when the nerves that control the facial muscles are affected. Symptoms may include mild muscle weakness with loss of movement in the face that varies depending on the progression of the disease.

10. Miscellaneous symptoms

Other symptoms of neuropathy may include eye pain, sweating, heat intolerance, loss of bladder and bowel control, double vision, difficulty concentrating, and weakness in the fingers.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Back Pain, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Why You Can’t ‘Fix’ Your Pain

Being a positive person is obviously a good quality to have, but sometimes an overly optimistic attitude or misguided belief about what’s possible can actually get in the way of healing. One example of this is the notion that there is a cure or fix for everything that hurts.
Quite understandably, many patients go to their doctors with the goal of getting fixed. They want to find out what the problem is, get it fixed, make the pain go away, and then move on with their lives. But humans are not machines – you can’t just replace or repair a broken part and then everything runs as good as new. The pain you experience is often the product of many interconnecting factors and not just one simple cause. Human beings simply don’t come with an easy-to-read owner’s manual.
Back pain is a prime example. Back pain or sciatica may indeed start with a trigger, like a herniated disc or a lifting injury. But a single targeted tissue injury can quickly lead to a train of events that include back muscles tightening up, joints stiffening, and nerves to malfunction. As this happens, the back gets harder to move, the legs get weaker, and it becomes increasingly difficult to sleep, get comfortable, or go to work. If this situation continues, then a person can easily become anxious, depressed, withdraw from friends and family, and feel the pinch of lost income.
Expecting that all of these complex and interconnected problems will get solved simply by undergoing back surgery to “fix” something structural can turn out to be a recipe for disaster. Recovering from an extensive back surgery like a fusion can mean months or years of recovery without a guarantee of substantial and lasting pain relief. Regardless of the treatments you choose, it helps to adopt the mindset of healing from what hurts as opposed to focusing on a quick fix or cure. Muscle imbalances, inflamed joints, herniated discs, and injured nerves can all go through a recovery process, and the more time and attention you put into that, the better the outcome.
And it’s not just the body that needs to heal. The psyche and soul of the person in pain need a path to ease uncomfortable mood changes and provide relief from overwhelming stress. Continuous pain can trigger a “flight or fight” response, which leads to changes in the nervous system, endocrine system, and immune system that keep us constantly on edge and in panic mode. One surgery or treatment won’t necessarily restore emotional balance and make all of this disappear.
Healing can also mean acceptance of what is, with all of its imperfections. For instance, a natural part of how the body heals is to lay down scar tissue. A broken bone or torn tendon can heal, but it won’t look exactly the way it did before the injury. We can’t go back in time and look, move or feel exactly the way we did years ago, so it’s better to focus our time and energy on making today the best it can be. Acceptance is not giving up, but rather reaching an understanding of how we can be the best version of ourselves after all that we have gone through.
Both the human body and the human spirit are designed to heal, repair, and restore itself when injured. Shifting from a “fix it” mindset to one focused on healing can open up new doors toward better pain management and well-being.
Article Provided By: WebMD

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Cope

10 Tips to Cope With Chronic Pain

1. Practicing meditation or deep, controlled breathing

Deep breathing and meditation guide the body and mind into a state of relaxation. Deep breathing involves slowly inhaling through the nose (so the belly expands), holding for a few counts and slowly exhaling through the mouth (so the belly deflates). Meditation involves the repetition of a positive word or phrase (mantra) while deep breathing in a comfortable position.

Chronic Pain, Cope, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

2. Easing stress in daily life

Undesirable feelings of anxiety, depression, anger, sadness and stress can escalate the body’s pain response. Reducing everyday stress triggers helps reduce chronic pain symptoms.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

3. Finding a support group

Engaging with other people who have chronic pain helps individuals feel less isolated and better understood. Individuals may also be introduced to new coping methods or treatment options by other members in the group.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

4. Exercising to release natural endorphins

Exercise releases endorphins, which are brain chemicals that support mood while simultaneously blocking pain signals. Exercise, when done in moderation, can help reduce chronic pain.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5. Keeping a daily journal of pain level and activities

Keeping a daily journal not only helps express feelings and emotions, it also provides insight into chronic pain trends and effective coping mechanisms. Sharing a pain journal with a health care professional helps them better understand how an individual’s chronic pain is managed between visits, which leads to better treatment.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

6. Limiting alcohol intake

The consumption of alcohol often disrupts sleep. Because sleep issues are often a symptom of chronic pain conditions, cutting back alcohol intake or nixing the habit altogether can increase the quality of sleep which promotes pain reduction.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

7. No smoking

In addition to the many negative health consequences of smoking cigarettes, smoking also causes circulation problems which can aggravate pain levels.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

8. Scheduling a massage

Massage therapy can both lessen muscle tension and reduce stress. Getting regular massages can help reduce pain levels.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

9. Eating a healthy diet

Eating a healthy diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease, aid healthy digestion, improve blood sugar levels and maintain a healthy weight. Choosing anti-inflammatory foods is especially helpful for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

10. Taking the focus away from the pain

Focusing on positive things or engaging in an activity that keeps the mind busy diverts attention away from chronic pain. While pain may not be fully alleviated, distraction is a powerful pain-reduction tool.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina
Article Provided By: PainScale
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Beating Insomnia with Chronic Pain

Approximately two-thirds of people with chronic pain also suffer from insomnia. It takes a multidisciplinary approach to with different medical specialists to treat both pain and insomnia. For example, certain pain medications can improve sleep while others disturb it. The first step to improving insomnia is to understand its cause.

For some people with chronic pain, insomnia may be caused by an inadequate bedtime routine. This may include using electronic devices such as computers, smartphones, and TVs to help individuals fall asleep, which only make it harder to fall asleep and stay asleep. Ensuring a quiet environment and turning off all electrical devices two hours before bedtime can help improve the quality of sleep.

Because pain intensifies at night, it can become impossible to sleep. Some individuals may benefit from using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help them fall asleep at night. This includes a variety of methods to improve sleep and change negative thoughts to positive ones that promote sleep. Cognitive behavioral therapy is preferred over medications as it does not contain side effects that may be counterproductive to sleep.

The long-term goal of cognitive behavioral therapy is to help individuals control negative thoughts that keep them awake at night. Relaxation training is also helpful for individuals to reduce muscle tension and distract them from thoughts of pain. Techniques include guided imagery, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, and deep breathing muscle relaxation exercises. Individuals are encouraged to participate in three to eight sessions with a trained behavioral therapist to become familiar with this form of treatment.

Along with reconstructive behavioral therapy and relaxation techniques, individuals can follow these tips to create healthy sleep habits:

  • Do not use the bed for anything except sleeping. Avoid watching TV or reading books in bed as this will help the body and brain know that it’s time for sleep when your head hits the pillow.
  • Only go to bed when tired. If you are unable to fall asleep within 20 minutes, get up and go to another room. Return to bed when you are tired.
  • Wake up at the same time every day and go to sleep at the same time every night. Aim for seven to eight hours of sleep at night.
  • Avoid napping during the day.
  • Exercise early in the day and do not exercise close to bedtime.
  • Avoid excessive caffeine and alcohol intake.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Accepting a Chronic Pain Diagnosis

Receiving a diagnosis of chronic pain can be devastating; yet a clear diagnosis can also bring peace of mind to those who have internally questioned why they are in pain. As with any chronic health condition, chronic pain requires individuals to actively make changes in their lives to reduce the severity of the condition. This usually involves a combination of medical treatments, lifestyle changes and psychological help.

After receiving a chronic pain diagnosis, individuals often go through stages of emotions similar to the Kübler-Ross model of grief. They are grieving life as they once knew it. Emotions that may be experienced include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Shock and denial
    In the beginning, individuals in chronic pain may resist going to needed doctor’s appointments because it may be difficult to face the truth. Even after a diagnosis, individuals may be in shock or denial and not agree with the diagnosis or treatment plan(s).
  • Anger
    After the initial phase of denial, anger usually arises. Not only can the experience of pain cause angry feelings, but receiving a diagnosis of chronic pain can lead to frustration and irritation. Individuals may ponder, “Why me?” or “How could this have happened?”
  • Bargaining, fear and anxiety
    Individuals with chronic pain may experience fear about the future. “What if” thoughts often creep into the psyche. Struggling to find the “meaning of life” after a chronic pain diagnosis is common.
  • Depression
    Thirty to fifty percent of individuals with chronic pain also deal with depression. Chronic pain can cause depression, and depression can increase chronic pain; it is often a vicious cycle.
  • Acceptance and hope
    While most individuals with chronic pain eventually gain acceptance of their condition, some individuals never reach this stage as they are stuck in anger, fear or depression. Accepting a chronic pain diagnosis does not mean giving into it. An individual may experience pain for the rest of their life, but they can always control their reaction to it with treatment(s) and lifestyle changes. Acceptance takes time. Adjusting to a major lifestyle change is a process. Psychotherapy, group therapy or simply family support are all important factors in finding acceptance of and hope for a chronic pain diagnosis. Anti-depressant medications are available for those diagnosed with clinical depression.

These emotional stages do not follow a strict schedule nor are they always sequential. People with chronic pain may experience many emotions at once or their emotions may fluctuate among the stages.

Individuals with chronic pain experience a plethora of emotions in relation to their chronic pain: anger, frustration, anxiety, depression, etc. These are common emotional reactions; however, when they affect daily living, they should be shared with a health care provider. Talking with a trusted family member, seeing a mental health counselor or joining a support group can help an individual properly deal with the emotional aspects of chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Neuropathy and Chronic Back Pain

As many as 10 percent of the world’s population currently have neuropathic pain. Chronic neuropathic pain, sometimes referred to as peripheral neuropathy or peripheral neuritis, is caused by nerve damage.

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

Neuropathic pain differs from other kinds of pain. For example, when a person breaks a bone, the nerves located at the site of the break carry pain signals to the brain. But with neuropathic pain, the damage is contained in the nerves themselves.

In most cases, neuropathy is caused when a dysfunction occurs in the way nerves respond to trauma or injury. The nerves become hypersensitive and send false pain signals to the brain when the original injury or trauma has actually healed. Most injuries begin in the peripheral or central nervous system.

Back Pain May Result In Neuropathy

Any type of condition or injury that compresses a nerve can lead to neuropathy. A herniated disc is a good example of a back injury that can result in neuropathy. Other forms of neuropathic pain that originate in the spine or back include the following:

  • Sciatica or chronic pain that radiates down the leg
  • Cervical radiculopathy or chronic pain that runs down the arm
  • Failed back surgery or any pain that occurs after surgery and persists

Other forms of neuropathy may be caused by complex regional pain syndrome, diabetes, injections, injury, disease, substance abuse or exposure to toxins. However, the cause of neuropathy is not always apparent.

Early Treatment Is Critical

Treatment of neuropathy in its early stages offers the best opportunity for successful treatment. Exposure to chronic pain may cause the central nervous system to become hypersensitive over time. In rare cases, this can lead to central sensitization, when even the slightest touch causes pain.

Neuropathy may also lead to other health problems, such as mobility issues, sleep difficulties, anxiety, depression and social isolation.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Chronic Pain and Exercise

Chronic or persistent pain occurs when pain remains even when the injury that caused the pain in the first place has healed. Although tissue damage causes acute pain, chronic pain has less to do with tissue damage and more to do with the sensitivity of the nervous system. Research shows that exercise may be able to treat chronic pain effectively.

For a person with chronic pain, exercise might be the last thing on their mind. Chronic pain patients are at an increased risk of becoming less able to perform daily activities due to inactivity, such as walking, keeping up with household work, and even personal care. Exercise can be a primary form of treatment that gives control back to a chronic pain patient’s daily life.

Several studies show that exercise prevents deconditioning, which may cause pain to become worse over time. Deconditioning causes muscles to become weaker and makes it harder for the patient to move around without pain. Remember that exercise can be a form of medicine and should be treated as such. Daily exercise is just as important as taking daily medications.

When exercising with chronic pain, be sure to warm up properly to avoid an injury. Perform stretches at the end of your training session, not at the beginning as your muscles will be cold. Do short bursts of exercise at first and then gradually increase the amount of time you spend exercising. Start slowly and use the 0-10 scale to monitor your pain levels while exercising. If pain increases while exercising, stop and take a rest or pick it up again the next day.

Recommended exercises include the following:
  • Yoga
  • Stretching
  • Meditation
  • Walking
  • Swimming
  • Stationary Bike
  • Resistance, strength, or bodyweight training
  • Pilates
  • Any aerobic activity that does not cause pain, such as tennis or golf

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
CRPS, Pain Relief, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10 Questions About CRPS

1. What is CRPS?

CRPS stands for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. It may also be referred to as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome. It is a chronic pain condition. Chronic pain means lasting 6 months or more. With CRPS, your nerves are affected, sending pain signals to the brain without an easy to diagnose cause. It may be caused by a malfunction in your central or peripheral nervous systems.

2. Is Excessive Sweating a Symptom of CRPS?

Yes, many people who have CRPS have issues with sweating. This includes sweating too much or not sweating at all. It is very common to have both extremes come and go when you are diagnosed with CRPS.

3. I am Experiencing Memory Problems. Is this a Symptom of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Yes, many people with CRPS experience forgetfulness, cognitive impairment, and memory issues.

4. Will CRPS Spread to Other Parts of the Body?

While it is not guaranteed, it is common for CRPS to spread in many cases. If Complex Regional Pain Syndrome does spread, it is usually to nearby areas. For example, if you have CRPS in your arm, it may spread to your hand or shoulder. If you have pain in your leg, it may spread to your foot or buttocks.

5. Will CRPS Go Away on its Own?

Unfortunately, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome will not simply go away. This is why early diagnosis and treatment is critical. In some cases, people can go undiagnosed with CRPS for years; if there is a possibility that a person may have CRPS, going to see a doctor is imperative.

6. Is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome a Life Long Disease?

There is no universal answer to this question. There are a variety of factors that may contribute to whether CRPS goes into remission or if a person will experience the symptoms for their entire life Chances may increase that a person achieves remission by having CRPS diagnosed by an expert as soon as symptoms are noticed.

7. Will Ice Help Alleviate the Pain?

In general, it is NOT recommended for those experiencing CRPS to use ice or hot and cold contrast therapy.

8. How Do I Find the Right Doctor?

It will be important to find a clinic that specializes or has a successful history or treating CRPS. Ask a primary care physician to provide a referral for a pain specialist who treats CRPS on a regular basis.

9. Can CRPS Be Treated with Medication?

Yes, there a variety of medications that can help with the pain that is experienced from CRPS. Since one medication is not necessarily better than the other, it will be important to get a proper diagnosis from a doctor.

10. Will a Nerve Block Help with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Yes, nerve blocks have been shown to be successful in treating CRPS; however, they may not consistently work. An individual’s response to treatment depends on the person and the variables surrounding their specific case of CRPS.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Diabetic Neuropathy, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Understanding Diabetic Neuropathy

Over time, your diabetes can cause nerve damage that can lead to neuropathy. The increased and uncontrollable levels of glucose (sugar) cause the neuropathy. Commonly, affecting the nerves in your arms, hands, legs or feet for some even problems are seen in the digestive system, heart, blood vessels, and urinary tract. Pain, tingling, numbness, disabling, and even death are some complications of diabetic neuropathy. Often, diabetic neuropathy develops gradually and signs and symptoms may not appear until major damage has occurred to your nerves. The neuropathy can often be prevented if glucose levels are under control along with maintaining a healthy diet and exercise. The four common types of diabetic neuropathy include:

The common form of diabetic neuropathy is first seen in toes, feet, and legs and then in hands and arms. The signs and symptoms such as pain, tingling, burning sensation, cramps, numbness, or reduced feeling to pain and temperature are often heightened at night. Peripheral neuropathy also presents with muscle weakness, loss of reflexes, and increased sensitivity to touch, loss of balance, coordination. It may also show ulcers, infections, deformities, bone and joint pain in the foot.

Autonomic Neuropathy

In this neuropathy, you will notice neural changes in your autonomic system that controls your digestion, bowel, heart, bladder, lungs, eyes, and sex organs. The signs and symptoms you should look for are hypoglycemia unawareness, difficulty swallowing, erectile dysfunction in men, urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence or retention. Other changes to notice include a change in perspiration, vaginal dryness, sexual difficulties in women, issues regulating body temperature, unable to regulate blood pressure and heart rate, increased heart rate while resting, and the ability for your eyes to adjust from light to dark. A few other issues are constipation, uncontrollable diarrhea, and the slow emptying of the stomach.

Radiculoplexus Neuropathy

This neuropathy is also known as diabetic amyotrophy, proximal, and femoral neuropathy that damages the nerves to the hips, thighs, gluts, or legs. This neuropathy is often seen in type 2 diabetics and older adults with diabetes. The signs and symptoms are often seen unilaterally, on one side of the body, and often worsen before you see any relief. Radiculoplexus neuropathy presents with abdominal swelling, weight loss, weak, atrophied thigh muscles and difficulty standing from a sitting position. You will also notice sudden, severe pain in hip, thigh, or gluts.

Mononeuropathy

Mononeuropathy is also referred to focal neuropathy that affects a particular nerve often in the head, torso, or leg. Usually occurs in older adults with diabetes, comes on suddenly without causing much long-term issues, and lasts for a few weeks to months. This neuropathy causes inability to focus on your eyes, double vision, aching behind one eye, or paralysis unilaterally known as Bell’s palsy. You may also notice pain in your lower back, pelvis, shin, foot, chest, abdomen, or front of the thigh.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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