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Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis.
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
The most common type of peripheral neuropathy is diabetic neuropathy, caused by a high sugar level and resulting in nerve fiber damage in your legs and feet.
Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects, such as burning pain or paralysis.

Peripheral neuropathy is a type of damage to the nervous system. Specifically, it is a problem with your peripheral nervous system. This is the network of nerves that sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body.
Peripheral Neuropathy Causes
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. Some people inherit the disorder from their parents. Others develop it because of an injury or another disorder.
In many cases, a different type of problem, such as a kidney condition or a hormone imbalance, leads to peripheral neuropathy. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
Peripheral Neuropathy Types
There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis. To help doctors classify them, they are often broken down into the following categories:
Motor neuropathy. This is damage to the nerves that control muscles and movement in the body, such as moving your hands and arms or talking.
Sensory neuropathy. Sensory nerves control what you feel, such as pain, temperature or a light touch. Sensory neuropathy affects these groups of nerves.
Autonomic nerve neuropathy. Autonomic nerves control functions that you are not conscious of, such as breathing and heartbeat. Damage to these nerves can be serious.
Combination neuropathies. You may have a mix of 2 or 3 of these other types of neuropathies, such as a sensory-motor neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy vary based on the type that you have and what part of the body is affected. Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects such as burning pain or paralysis.
Muscle weakness
Cramps
Muscle twitching
Loss of muscle and bone
Changes in skin, hair, or nails
Numbness
Loss of sensation or feeling in body parts
Loss of balance or other functions as a side effect of the loss of feeling in the legs, arms, or other body parts
Emotional disturbances
Sleep disruptions
Loss of pain or sensation that can put you at risk, such as not feeling an impending heart attack or limb pain
Inability to sweat properly, leading to heat intolerance
Loss of bladder control, leading to infection or incontinence
Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting because of a loss of control over blood pressure
Diarrhea, constipation, or incontinence related to nerve damage in the intestines or digestive tract
Trouble eating or swallowing
Life-threatening symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or irregular heartbeat
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy may look like other conditions or medical problems. Always see your healthcare provider for a diagnosis.
Peripheral Neuropathy Diagnosis
The symptoms and body parts affected by peripheral neuropathy are so varied that it may be hard to make a diagnosis. If your healthcare provider suspects nerve damage, he or she will take an extensive medical history and do a number of neurological tests to determine the location and extent of your nerve damage. These may include:
Blood tests
Spinal fluid tests
Muscle strength tests
Tests of the ability to detect vibrations
Depending on what basic tests reveal, your healthcare provider may want to do more in-depth scanning and other tests to get a better look at your nerve damage. Tests may include:
CT scan
MRI scan
Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies
Nerve and skin biopsy
Peripheral Neuropathy Treatment
Usually a peripheral neuropathy can’t be cured, but you can do a lot of things to prevent it from getting worse. If an underlying condition like diabetes is at fault, your healthcare provider will treat that first and then treat the pain and other symptoms of neuropathy.
In some cases, over-the-counter pain relievers can help. Other times, prescription medicines are needed. Some of these medicines include mexiletine, a medicine developed to correct irregular heart rhythms; antiseizure drugs, such as gabapentin, phenytoin, and carbamazepine; and some classes of antidepressants, including tricyclics such as amitriptyline.
Lidocaine injections and patches may help with pain in other instances. And in extreme cases, surgery can be used to destroy nerves or repair injuries that are causing neuropathic pain and symptoms.
Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention
Lifestyle choices can play a role in preventing peripheral neuropathy. You can lessen your risk for many of these conditions by avoiding alcohol, correcting vitamin deficiencies, eating a healthy diet, losing weight, avoiding toxins, and exercising regularly. If you have kidney disease, diabetes, or other chronic health condition, it is important to work with your healthcare provider to control your condition, which may prevent or delay the onset of peripheral neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Management
Even if you already have some form of peripheral neuropathy, healthy lifestyle steps can help you feel your best and reduce the pain and symptoms related to the disorder. You’ll also want to quit smoking, not let injuries go untreated, and be meticulous about caring for your feet and treating wounds to avoid complications, such as the loss of a limb.
In some cases, non-prescription hand and foot braces can help you make up for muscle weakness. Orthotics can help you walk better. Relaxation techniques, such as yoga, may help ease emotional as well as physical symptoms.

 

Article Provided By: hopkinsmedicine

 

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Femoral Neuropathy

Femoral Neuropathy

What is femoral neuropathy?

Femoral neuropathy, or femoral nerve dysfunction, occurs when you can’t move or feel part of your leg because of damaged nerves, specifically the femoral nerve. This can result from an injury, prolonged pressure on the nerve, or damage from disease. In most cases, this condition will go away without treatment. However, medications and physical therapy may be necessary if symptoms don’t improve.

What causes femoral neuropathy?

The femoral nerve is one of the largest nerves in your leg. It’s located near the groin and controls the muscles that help straighten your leg and move your hips. It also provides feeling in the lower part of your leg and the front of your thigh. Because of where it’s located, damage to the femoral nerve is uncommon relative to neuropathies caused by damage to other nerves. When the femoral nerve is damaged, it affects your ability to walk and may cause problems with sensation in your leg and foot. View the femoral nerve on this BodyMap of the femur.

Damage to the femoral nerve can be the result of:

  • a direct injury
  • a tumor or other growth blocking or trapping part of your nerve
  • prolonged pressure on the nerve, such as from prolonged immobilization
  • a pelvic fracture
  • radiation to the pelvis
  • hemorrhage or bleeding into the space behind the abdomen, which is called the retroperitoneal space
  • a catheter placed into the femoral artery, which is necessary for certain surgical procedures

Diabetes may cause femoral neuropathy. Diabetes can cause widespread nerve damage due to fluctuations in blood sugar and blood pressure. Nerve damage that affects your legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms is known as peripheral neuropathy. There is currently some debate about whether femoral neuropathy is truly a peripheral neuropathy or a form of diabetic amyotrophy.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), diabetes is the most common reason for peripheral neuropathy in people who’ve had diabetes for at least 25 years.

Signs of femoral neuropathy

This nerve condition can lead to difficulties moving around. Your leg or knee might feel weak, and you may be unable to put pressure on the affected leg.

You might also feel unusual sensations in your legs. They include:

  • numbness in any part of the leg (typically the front and inside of the thigh, but potentially all the way down to the feet)
  • tingling in any part of the leg
  • dull aching pain in the genital region
  • lower extremity muscle weakness
  • difficulty extending the knee due to quadriceps weakness
  • feeling like your leg or knee is going to give out (buckle) on you
How serious is it?

Prolonged pressure placed on the femoral nerve can prevent blood from flowing in the affected area. The decreased blood flow can result in tissue damage.

If your nerve damage is the result of an injury, it may be possible that your femoral vein or artery is also damaged. This could cause dangerous internal bleeding. The femoral artery is a very large artery that lies close to the femoral nerve. Trauma often damages both at the same time. Injury to the artery or bleeding from the artery can cause compression on the nerve.

Additionally, the femoral nerve provides sensation to a major portion of the leg. This loss of sensation can lead to injuries. Having weak leg muscles can make you more prone to falling. Falls are of particular concern in older adults because they can cause hip fractures, which are very serious injuries.

 

Diagnosing femoral neuropathy

Initial tests

To diagnose femoral neuropathy and its cause, your doctor will perform a comprehensive physical exam and ask questions about recent injuries or surgeries, as well as questions about your medical history.

To look for weakness, they will test specific muscles that receive sensation from the femoral nerve. Your doctor will probably check your knee reflexes and ask about changes in feeling in the front part of the thigh and the middle part of the leg. The goal of the evaluation is to determine whether the weakness involves only the femoral nerve or if other nerves also contribute.

Additional testing might include:

Nerve conduction

Nerve conduction checks the speed of electrical impulses in your nerves. An abnormal response, such as a slow time for electrical signals to travel through your nerves, usually indicates damage to the nerve in question.

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) should be performed after the nerve conduction test to see how well your muscles and nerves are working. This test records the electrical activity present in your muscles when the nerves that lead to them are active. The EMG will determine whether the muscle responds appropriately to stimulation. Certain medical conditions cause muscles to fire on their own, which is an abnormality that an EMG can reveal. Because nerves stimulate and control your muscles, the test can identify problems with both muscles and nerves.

MRI and CT scans

An MRI scan can look for tumors, growths, or any other masses in the area of the femoral nerve that could cause compression on the nerve. MRI scans use radio waves and magnets to produce a detailed image of the part of your body that is being scanned.

A CT scan can also look for vascular or bone growths.

Treatment options

The first step in treating femoral neuropathy is dealing with the underlying condition or cause. If compression on the nerve is the cause, the goal will be to relieve the compression. Occasionally in mild injuries, such as mild compression or a stretch injury, the problem may resolve spontaneously. For people with diabetes, bringing blood sugar levels back to normal may alleviate nerve dysfunction. If your nerve doesn’t improve on its own, you’ll need treatment. This usually involves medications and physical therapy.

Medications

You might have corticosteroid injections in your leg to reduce inflammation and get rid of any swelling that occurs. Pain medications can help relieve any pain and discomfort. For neuropathic pain, your doctor may prescribe medications, such as gabapentin, pregabalin, or amitriptyline.

Therapy

Physical therapy can help build up the strength in your leg muscles again. A physical therapist will teach you exercises to strengthen and stretch your muscles. Undergoing physical therapy helps to reduce pain and promote mobility.

You might need to use an orthopedic device, such as a brace, to assist you with walking. Usually, a knee brace is helpful in preventing knee buckling.

Depending on how severe the nerve damage is and how much trouble you’re having moving around, you might also need occupational therapy. This type of therapy helps you learn to do regular tasks like bathing and other self-care activities. These are called “activities of daily living.” Your doctor might also recommend vocational counseling if your condition forces you to find another line of work.

Surgery

Your doctor might recommend surgery if you have a growth blocking your femoral nerve. Removing the growth will relieve the pressure on your nerve.

Long-term outlook after treatment

You might be able to heal fully after you treat the underlying condition. If the treatment isn’t successful or if the femoral nerve damage is severe, you might permanently lose feeling in that part of your leg or the ability to move it.

Tips to prevent nerve damage

You can lower your risk of femoral neuropathy caused by diabetes by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. This helps protect your nerves from damage caused by this disease. Preventive measures would be directed at each cause. Talk to your doctor for advice about what preventive measures would be the best for you.

Maintaining an active lifestyle helps to keep your leg muscles strong and improve stability.

Last medically reviewed on September 13, 2017

 

Article Provided ByHealthline

 

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Nerve Pain Therapy, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Calmare Scrambler, Chronic Pain Therapy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint is thought to cause low back pain and/or leg pain. The leg pain can be particularly difficult and may feel similar to sciatica or pain caused by a lumbar disc herniation. The sacroiliac joint lies next to the bottom of the spine, below the lumbar spine and above the tailbone (coccyx). It connects the sacrum (the triangular bone at the bottom of the spine) with the pelvis (iliac crest).

The joint typically has the following characteristics:

  • Small and very strong, reinforced by strong ligaments that surround it
  • Does not have much motion
  • Transmits all the forces of the upper body to the pelvis (hips) and legs
  • Acts as a shock-absorbing structure

Symptoms

The most common symptoms for patients are lower back pain and the following sensations in the lower extremity: pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, pelvis/buttock pain, hip/groin pain, feeling of leg instability (buckling, giving way), disturbed sleep patterns, disturbed sitting patterns (unable to sit for long periods, sitting on one side), pain going from sitting to standing.


Causes and Risk Factors

While it is not clear how the pain is caused, it is thought that an alteration in the normal joint motion may be the culprit that causes sacroiliac pain. This source of pain can be caused by either:

Too much movement (hypermobility or instability): The pain is typically felt in the lower back and/or hip and may radiate into the groin area.

Too little movement (hypomobility or fixation): The pain is typically felt on one side of the lower back or buttocks and can radiate down the leg. The pain usually remains above the knee, but at times pain can extend to the ankle or foot. The pain is similar to sciatica — or pain that radiates down the sciatic nerve — and is caused by a radiculopathy.

Diagnosis

Accurately diagnosing sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be difficult because the symptoms mimic other common conditions, including other mechanical back pain conditions like facet syndrome and lumbar spine conditions including disc herniation and radiculopathy (pain along the sciatic nerve that radiates down the leg). A diagnosis is usually arrived at through physical examination (eliminating other causes) and/or an injection (utilized to block the pain).

Treatments

Treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction are usually conservative (meaning nonsurgical) and focus on trying to restore normal motion in the joint:

  • Ice, heat and rest.
  • Medications: acetaminophen, as well as anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen or naproxen) to reduce the swelling that is usually contributing to the patient’s pain.
  • Manual manipulation provided by a chiropractor, osteopathic doctor or other qualified health practitioner may help. This can be highly effective when the sacroiliac joint is fixated or “stuck.” It may be irritating if the sacroiliac joint is hypermobile. The manipulation is accomplished through a number of methods, including (but not limited to): side-posture manipulation, drop technique, blocking techniques and instrument-guided methods.
  • Supports or braces for when the sacroiliac joint is “hypermobile,” or too loose.
  • Controlled, gradual physical therapy may be helpful to strengthen the muscles around the sacroiliac joint and appropriately increase range of motion. In addition, any type of gentle, low-impact aerobic exercise will help increase the flow of blood to the area, which in turn stimulates a healing response. For severe pain, water therapy may be an option, as the water provides buoyancy for the body and reduces stress on the painful joint.
  • Sacroiliac joint injections.

When these treatments fail, surgery may be offered. In surgery, one or both of the sacroiliac joints may be fused with the goal of eliminating any abnormal motion.

Article Provided By: Cedars-Sinai

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Sciatica

Six sciatica stretches for pain relief

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Sciatica itself is not a condition, but a very uncomfortable symptom of many potential problems in the back, pelvis, and hip.

People with sciatica often experience pain running through the buttocks and down the back of the leg. However, it does not have to originate in the back; it can be caused by an injury to the pelvis or hip, or from direct pressure to the sciatic nerve.

The pain can be mild or so severe that a person with sciatica may have trouble standing, sitting, or even sleeping. There is a range of treatments for sciatica, including many stretches that may help to ease the pain.

Overview
People with sciatica can experience pain that makes it difficult for them to sit or stand.

The sciatic nerve is a nerve that originates in the lower back on either side of the spine. It runs through the buttocks and into the hips before branching down each leg.

This nerve is the longest nerve in the body and provides sensation to the outer leg and foot.

Sciatica itself is not an injury or disease. Instead, sciatica refers to a symptom of any number of problems.

Sciatica is nerve pain that runs through the buttocks, down the back of the leg and into the ankle or foot.

Some people that have sciatica describe the pain as shooting, sharp, or burning. They may experience weakness in the affected leg. The pain may worsen with sudden movements, such as coughing.

Stretches for pain relief

Certain stretches may provide some relief for people experiencing sciatica-related pain.

Anecdotally, most people with sciatica do find stretching helps relieve pain. However, people with sciatica should speak to a doctor before doing any sciatica stretches to avoid further injury.

A doctor or physical therapist may recommend that people perform several of these stretches each day:

  • knees to chest
  • cobra or modified cobra
  • seated hip stretch
  • standing hamstring stretch
  • seated spinal twist
  • knee to shoulder

Follow these simple instructions to perform these stretches for sciatica pain relief:

If any of these exercises make the sciatica worse, stop immediately. It is normal to feel stretching during these movements, however it is not normal for the sciatic pain to increase.

Treatment

As well as stretching, some people who experience sciatica symptoms also try other home remedies to ease their pain and discomfort.

Other home remedies include the following:

  • Ice: Icing the area for 20 minutes several times a day for the first two to three days after the pain begins.
  • Heat: Using heat on the area after the first few days.
  • Anti-inflammatories: Taking anti-inflammatory medications to ease the pain. Ibuprofen is available for purchase over-the-counter or online.

Anyone that experiences sciatica for longer than a month should seek medical attention. Additionally, any person that has severe sciatica should seek medical care as soon as possible.

Treatment for an individual’s sciatica largely depends on what is causing the pain.

Some common causes of sciatica include the following:

  • herniated disc or one of the rubbery cushions between the spinal bones slipping out of place
  • a narrowing of the spinal cord that puts pressure on the lumbar spine known as lumbar spinal stenosis
  • a progressive disease that wears away the cushions in the spinal column known as degenerative disk disease
  • pregnancy
  • other injuries to the back that put excess pressure on the sciatic nerve
Prevention

It is not always possible to prevent sciatica. However, some lifestyle modifications can significantly help reduce a person’s risk of experiencing sciatica again.

In general, regular exercise and building a strong core may help prevent sciatica. Additionally maintaining a good posture while sitting and standing is important, and may make people less likely to develop sciatica than people with poor posture.

Article Provided By: medicalnewstoday

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Neuropathic Pain, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

What is Neuropathic Pain?

If you are involved in an accident and an injury occurs, under normal circumstance, your nerves will send messages to the brain, signaling pain at the site of trauma. Neuropathic pain is coming directly from the nerves without the occurrence of trauma or accident. In other words, there is no reason the nerves should be sending pain signals.

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

A damaged nerve may lead to dysfunction. Nerves can be damaged in a previous injury or surgery. As a result, the damaged nerve may send false signals of pain to the brain, despite there being no real cause of pain. In the case of a previous injury, the site of trauma may have completely healed but the central nervous system is still registering the site as a location of trauma.

Neuropathy Symptoms

There are several key symptoms associated with Neuropathy:

  • Normal movements become painful
  • Mobility is limited
  • May lead to a sedentary lifestyle
  • Pain will range from mild to severe
  • Pain may be experienced differently – For example: sharp, shock-like, shooting, etc
  • Numbness
  • Feeling of coldness
  • Tingling
  • Persistent numbness, tingling, or weakness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Insomnia

Neuropathic Pain Relief Treatments

First, your doctor will attempt to find the cause of the Neuropathy. Tests such as an MRI and Electromyography are conducted. If a cause is discovered, such as a herniated disc as the central cause of the pain, the appropriate measures are taken.

If no obvious cause is discovered, your doctor will focus on prescribing an effective pain relief method. The pain relief will depend on the individual and the severity of the neuropathy. Treatment options typically include medications, an active method of recovery such as physical therapy, and spinal cord stimulation for more complex cases.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Pain Management, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Yoga

Can Yoga Ease Your Pain?

Have a pain problem and wondering if yoga can help? Yoga has many benefits other than improving chronic pain such as, bettering your mood, teaching you to better manage stress, and just plain helping you smile after a rough day. Yoga’s popularity in the U.S. has grown rapidly over the last decade. An estimated 36 million Americans now practice yoga regularly, and about one in three have tried it at least once. While it is most popular with younger and middle-aged women, the number of men practicing yoga has more than doubled in the last several years, and those 50 and older with a yoga practice has tripled during that same time frame. But how exactly does it fit in to building a better pain management strategy? 

Pain relief

There’s growing evidence that yoga may be helpful in a wide variety of pain scenarios – arthritic knees, aching necks, fibromyalgia, and headaches. Perhaps the strongest evidence of yoga’s effectiveness is in the treatment of chronic low back pain. A number of studies have found it to be effective in reducing back pain, and in at least one study, patients practicing yoga were able to reduce their use of pain medications. Recent evidence-based guidelines from the American College of Physicians strongly recommend yoga for treating low back pain.

Function

Research also seems to indicate that yoga has the potential to improve function with daily activities. A regular yoga practice can increase strength in the legs, upper body, and core, while also improving flexibility and balance, which are especially important for seniors. A number of studies have found that both low-back pain patients, as well as arthritis sufferers, become more active when engaged in a yoga practice.

Well-being
Yoga can also offer some indirect relief by boosting a better sense of well-being, helping reduce stress, and increasing optimism and resilience. Studies also suggest practicing yoga can be associated with other healthy lifestyle habits, like quitting smoking, eating healthier, and losing weight. It also holds mental health benefits; research shows that it can play a helpful role in treatment plans for depression and anxiety. But incorporating yoga into a pain management program can be a bit tricky, and it is recommended that you first talk to your physicians and physical therapists before getting started. There can be a lot of bending in many typical classes, which can be problematic for back and neck pain sufferers. Poses that require being on all fours, like a plank position or the traditional downward dog pose, can over-stress a symptomatic shoulder problem. And for those with knee problems, squatting and kneeling can be hard to handle. The good news is that most yoga movements and poses can be modified or altered in some way to avoid flaring up or aggravating a symptomatic part of the body. Some yoga studios even offer classes that can be done while sitting in a chair for those who need that type of accommodation. Yoga is something that is therapeutic for both the mind and the body, as opposed to just exercise. If you are a beginner, it may seem a bit intimidating figuring out where to start, especially since there are so many different types of yoga. Names used to describe practices that are more movement-based include Ashtanga and vinyasa, while other versions, like yin, iyengar, and restorative, are more focused on alignment and holding postures. Make sure to verify ahead of time if a class is going to be held at room temperature or will be heated, and always start with a class that is geared toward beginners. Seek out yoga teachers that like to give students personal attention and want to help them modify poses. And, if you have the means, you may want to start with a few private lessons.And above all else, make sure you have some fun!

Article Provided By: WebMD Blogs

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Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Psychological

Psychological Effects of Chronic Pain

The fact of the matter is that chronic pain wears on you. It’s difficult to bear not only physically, but mentally. Since more than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, the psychological effects of pervasive pain are far reaching in our society. Understanding the psychological issues that accompany chronic pain is important for pain specialists and patients alike.

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’s five stages of grief have been used to break down and describe the experiences of people when they are grieving, giving a name and potentially helping people cope with feelings that seem all-powerful when you’re experiencing them. Chronic pain, both the diagnosis and experience, presents similar emotional upheaval. One PsyD, a Doctor Jennifer Martin, created the ‘7 stages of Chronic Pain and Illness’ to offer pain sufferers and physicians with a similar delineation. It’s important to remember that a person may experience these stages out of order or may circle back to an earlier stage. She describes them as follows:

Denial

When people realize that their pain may not be going away, it’s tough to swallow. They often experience shock and denial, which may prevent them from seeking out the help that they need to obtain proper treatment.

Pleading, Bargaining, and Desperation

Patients in this stage look for anything that may fix their condition or act as a bandage. They often bargain, either with themselves or a God, to make it better, all the while blaming themselves and experiencing tremendous guilt.

Anger

Once people understand that there’s no magical fix for their condition, they often experience anger. They may be mad at anyone related to their condition, including family, friends, care providers, employers, and anyone else they can tie their decline to.

Anxiety and Depression

Living with chronic pain can be scary and may bring on anxiety. It may also lead to depression. This occurs when a person feels hopeless, exhausted, and experience intense grief. This depression isn’t necessarily a mental illness, but an appropriate reaction to this type of change.

Loss of Self and Confusion

Chronic pain may lead to patients losing an integral part of their life. They may not be able to do the things they once did any longer, which can lead to an identity crisis of sorts.

Reevaluation of Life, Roles, and Goals

At this stage, people begin to come to terms with potential limitations and life changes. They begin to find a way to live their life within their new normal. Changing expectations of what things should be can help chronic pain patients find happiness despite their condition.

Acceptance

This doesn’t necessarily mean being alright with the way things are now. It simply means they’ve accepted the reality of their condition and are taking steps to live within that reality. It means choosing to move forward despite chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Treatment, Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy, Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Facts About Neuropathy Symptoms

Neuropathy occurs when there is a problem with the peripheral nerves, which are responsible for transporting signals from the central nervous system to the rest of the body. Symptoms may vary depending on what nerve is affected. Here are some common symptoms.

1. Numbness or tingling

Body numbing or tingling may occur when there is neuropathy or pain in a localized area of the body. It occurs when nerves that carry sensation messages (touch, pain, temperature) do not perform correctly.

2. Localized pain

Localized pain is caused when there are sharp or shooting pains that occur randomly in the body (especially in the legs). It may even occur from something as simple as a light touch.

3. Imbalance

People with peripheral neuropathy may lose their balance. It occurs when tissues in the body deploy receptors called proprioceptors to respond to stimuli. Loss of balance happens when these receptors become affected by neuropathy.

4. Abnormal walking gait

Neuropathy pain may cause people to develop an abnormal gait due to the dysfunction of the motor or sensory nerves. Symptoms may include dragging feet, a stooping walk or a lopsided shuffle when walking.

5. Muscle cramping

Peripheral neuropathy may cause dysfunction to motor nerves, which results in muscle cramps even with the slightest exertion, such as during daily activities.

6. Muscle weakness

Muscle weakness may occur along with muscle cramping. It occurs when patients have a hard time performing small movements that require precision, such as buttoning a shirt or picking up an object.

7. Gastrointestinal disorders

Digestive disorders may occur when neuropathy affects the autonomic nerves in the body, which control involuntary actions. Symptoms may include bloating, flatulence, constipation, and heartburn.

8. Low blood pressure

Autonomic nerves also control blood pressure. When neuropathy occurs, it may cause the affected person to develop hypertension. Symptoms may include blurred vision, fainting, dizziness, heart palpations, and fatigue.

9. Bell’s Palsy

In some cases of neuropathy, a very specific nerve may be affected. Bell’s Palsy may occur when the nerves that control the facial muscles are affected. Symptoms may include mild muscle weakness with loss of movement in the face that varies depending on the progression of the disease.

10. Miscellaneous symptoms

Other symptoms of neuropathy may include eye pain, sweating, heat intolerance, loss of bladder and bowel control, double vision, difficulty concentrating, and weakness in the fingers.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Back Pain, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Why You Can’t ‘Fix’ Your Pain

Being a positive person is obviously a good quality to have, but sometimes an overly optimistic attitude or misguided belief about what’s possible can actually get in the way of healing. One example of this is the notion that there is a cure or fix for everything that hurts.
Quite understandably, many patients go to their doctors with the goal of getting fixed. They want to find out what the problem is, get it fixed, make the pain go away, and then move on with their lives. But humans are not machines – you can’t just replace or repair a broken part and then everything runs as good as new. The pain you experience is often the product of many interconnecting factors and not just one simple cause. Human beings simply don’t come with an easy-to-read owner’s manual.
Back pain is a prime example. Back pain or sciatica may indeed start with a trigger, like a herniated disc or a lifting injury. But a single targeted tissue injury can quickly lead to a train of events that include back muscles tightening up, joints stiffening, and nerves to malfunction. As this happens, the back gets harder to move, the legs get weaker, and it becomes increasingly difficult to sleep, get comfortable, or go to work. If this situation continues, then a person can easily become anxious, depressed, withdraw from friends and family, and feel the pinch of lost income.
Expecting that all of these complex and interconnected problems will get solved simply by undergoing back surgery to “fix” something structural can turn out to be a recipe for disaster. Recovering from an extensive back surgery like a fusion can mean months or years of recovery without a guarantee of substantial and lasting pain relief. Regardless of the treatments you choose, it helps to adopt the mindset of healing from what hurts as opposed to focusing on a quick fix or cure. Muscle imbalances, inflamed joints, herniated discs, and injured nerves can all go through a recovery process, and the more time and attention you put into that, the better the outcome.
And it’s not just the body that needs to heal. The psyche and soul of the person in pain need a path to ease uncomfortable mood changes and provide relief from overwhelming stress. Continuous pain can trigger a “flight or fight” response, which leads to changes in the nervous system, endocrine system, and immune system that keep us constantly on edge and in panic mode. One surgery or treatment won’t necessarily restore emotional balance and make all of this disappear.
Healing can also mean acceptance of what is, with all of its imperfections. For instance, a natural part of how the body heals is to lay down scar tissue. A broken bone or torn tendon can heal, but it won’t look exactly the way it did before the injury. We can’t go back in time and look, move or feel exactly the way we did years ago, so it’s better to focus our time and energy on making today the best it can be. Acceptance is not giving up, but rather reaching an understanding of how we can be the best version of ourselves after all that we have gone through.
Both the human body and the human spirit are designed to heal, repair, and restore itself when injured. Shifting from a “fix it” mindset to one focused on healing can open up new doors toward better pain management and well-being.
Article Provided By: WebMD

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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10 Tips to Cope With Chronic Pain

1. Practicing meditation or deep, controlled breathing

Deep breathing and meditation guide the body and mind into a state of relaxation. Deep breathing involves slowly inhaling through the nose (so the belly expands), holding for a few counts and slowly exhaling through the mouth (so the belly deflates). Meditation involves the repetition of a positive word or phrase (mantra) while deep breathing in a comfortable position.

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2. Easing stress in daily life

Undesirable feelings of anxiety, depression, anger, sadness and stress can escalate the body’s pain response. Reducing everyday stress triggers helps reduce chronic pain symptoms.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

3. Finding a support group

Engaging with other people who have chronic pain helps individuals feel less isolated and better understood. Individuals may also be introduced to new coping methods or treatment options by other members in the group.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

4. Exercising to release natural endorphins

Exercise releases endorphins, which are brain chemicals that support mood while simultaneously blocking pain signals. Exercise, when done in moderation, can help reduce chronic pain.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5. Keeping a daily journal of pain level and activities

Keeping a daily journal not only helps express feelings and emotions, it also provides insight into chronic pain trends and effective coping mechanisms. Sharing a pain journal with a health care professional helps them better understand how an individual’s chronic pain is managed between visits, which leads to better treatment.

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6. Limiting alcohol intake

The consumption of alcohol often disrupts sleep. Because sleep issues are often a symptom of chronic pain conditions, cutting back alcohol intake or nixing the habit altogether can increase the quality of sleep which promotes pain reduction.

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7. No smoking

In addition to the many negative health consequences of smoking cigarettes, smoking also causes circulation problems which can aggravate pain levels.

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8. Scheduling a massage

Massage therapy can both lessen muscle tension and reduce stress. Getting regular massages can help reduce pain levels.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

9. Eating a healthy diet

Eating a healthy diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease, aid healthy digestion, improve blood sugar levels and maintain a healthy weight. Choosing anti-inflammatory foods is especially helpful for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

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10. Taking the focus away from the pain

Focusing on positive things or engaging in an activity that keeps the mind busy diverts attention away from chronic pain. While pain may not be fully alleviated, distraction is a powerful pain-reduction tool.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina
Article Provided By: PainScale
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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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