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Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis.
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
The most common type of peripheral neuropathy is diabetic neuropathy, caused by a high sugar level and resulting in nerve fiber damage in your legs and feet.
Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects, such as burning pain or paralysis.

Peripheral neuropathy is a type of damage to the nervous system. Specifically, it is a problem with your peripheral nervous system. This is the network of nerves that sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body.
Peripheral Neuropathy Causes
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. Some people inherit the disorder from their parents. Others develop it because of an injury or another disorder.
In many cases, a different type of problem, such as a kidney condition or a hormone imbalance, leads to peripheral neuropathy. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
Peripheral Neuropathy Types
There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis. To help doctors classify them, they are often broken down into the following categories:
Motor neuropathy. This is damage to the nerves that control muscles and movement in the body, such as moving your hands and arms or talking.
Sensory neuropathy. Sensory nerves control what you feel, such as pain, temperature or a light touch. Sensory neuropathy affects these groups of nerves.
Autonomic nerve neuropathy. Autonomic nerves control functions that you are not conscious of, such as breathing and heartbeat. Damage to these nerves can be serious.
Combination neuropathies. You may have a mix of 2 or 3 of these other types of neuropathies, such as a sensory-motor neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy vary based on the type that you have and what part of the body is affected. Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects such as burning pain or paralysis.
Muscle weakness
Cramps
Muscle twitching
Loss of muscle and bone
Changes in skin, hair, or nails
Numbness
Loss of sensation or feeling in body parts
Loss of balance or other functions as a side effect of the loss of feeling in the legs, arms, or other body parts
Emotional disturbances
Sleep disruptions
Loss of pain or sensation that can put you at risk, such as not feeling an impending heart attack or limb pain
Inability to sweat properly, leading to heat intolerance
Loss of bladder control, leading to infection or incontinence
Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting because of a loss of control over blood pressure
Diarrhea, constipation, or incontinence related to nerve damage in the intestines or digestive tract
Trouble eating or swallowing
Life-threatening symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or irregular heartbeat
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy may look like other conditions or medical problems. Always see your healthcare provider for a diagnosis.
Peripheral Neuropathy Diagnosis
The symptoms and body parts affected by peripheral neuropathy are so varied that it may be hard to make a diagnosis. If your healthcare provider suspects nerve damage, he or she will take an extensive medical history and do a number of neurological tests to determine the location and extent of your nerve damage. These may include:
Blood tests
Spinal fluid tests
Muscle strength tests
Tests of the ability to detect vibrations
Depending on what basic tests reveal, your healthcare provider may want to do more in-depth scanning and other tests to get a better look at your nerve damage. Tests may include:
CT scan
MRI scan
Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies
Nerve and skin biopsy
Peripheral Neuropathy Treatment
Usually a peripheral neuropathy can’t be cured, but you can do a lot of things to prevent it from getting worse. If an underlying condition like diabetes is at fault, your healthcare provider will treat that first and then treat the pain and other symptoms of neuropathy.
In some cases, over-the-counter pain relievers can help. Other times, prescription medicines are needed. Some of these medicines include mexiletine, a medicine developed to correct irregular heart rhythms; antiseizure drugs, such as gabapentin, phenytoin, and carbamazepine; and some classes of antidepressants, including tricyclics such as amitriptyline.
Lidocaine injections and patches may help with pain in other instances. And in extreme cases, surgery can be used to destroy nerves or repair injuries that are causing neuropathic pain and symptoms.
Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention
Lifestyle choices can play a role in preventing peripheral neuropathy. You can lessen your risk for many of these conditions by avoiding alcohol, correcting vitamin deficiencies, eating a healthy diet, losing weight, avoiding toxins, and exercising regularly. If you have kidney disease, diabetes, or other chronic health condition, it is important to work with your healthcare provider to control your condition, which may prevent or delay the onset of peripheral neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Management
Even if you already have some form of peripheral neuropathy, healthy lifestyle steps can help you feel your best and reduce the pain and symptoms related to the disorder. You’ll also want to quit smoking, not let injuries go untreated, and be meticulous about caring for your feet and treating wounds to avoid complications, such as the loss of a limb.
In some cases, non-prescription hand and foot braces can help you make up for muscle weakness. Orthotics can help you walk better. Relaxation techniques, such as yoga, may help ease emotional as well as physical symptoms.

 

Article Provided By: hopkinsmedicine

 

Back Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville, South Carolina

If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Causes of CRPS

What is complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)?

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS), is a type of chronic pain condition. It typically occurs after an injury or medical condition and affects one limb (arm, leg, hand or foot).

What are the causes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)?

Though complex regional pain syndrome is not yet completely understood, it is believed that CRPS develops when the central or peripheral nervous system is damaged or malfunctions. When the nerves are damaged, they are not able to properly control blood flow, sensation and temperature in the affected area; this leads to the symptoms of CRPS, including pain and skin changes.

CRPS can be triggered by an injury or a medical condition. Triggers for CRPS include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Sprain or strain
  • Soft tissue or nerve injury
  • Surgical injury
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Infection
  • Immobilization of a limb (such as using a splint or cast)

In addition to nerve damage, CRPS may also be caused by pain receptors in the injured part of the body becoming receptive to different nervous system messages. It may be caused by dysfunction between the central and peripheral nervous system.

The immune system may also play a role in the development of CRPS. After an injury, an immune response is triggered. This leads to inflammatory symptoms, such as redness and swelling in the affected area. In the case of CRPS, this immune system response may malfunction and continue after the original injury has healed.

It is likely that a combination of these different factors leads to the development of complex regional pain syndrome .

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Neuropathic Pain, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

What is Neuropathic Pain?

If you are involved in an accident and an injury occurs, under normal circumstance, your nerves will send messages to the brain, signaling pain at the site of trauma. Neuropathic pain is coming directly from the nerves without the occurrence of trauma or accident. In other words, there is no reason the nerves should be sending pain signals.

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

A damaged nerve may lead to dysfunction. Nerves can be damaged in a previous injury or surgery. As a result, the damaged nerve may send false signals of pain to the brain, despite there being no real cause of pain. In the case of a previous injury, the site of trauma may have completely healed but the central nervous system is still registering the site as a location of trauma.

Neuropathy Symptoms

There are several key symptoms associated with Neuropathy:

  • Normal movements become painful
  • Mobility is limited
  • May lead to a sedentary lifestyle
  • Pain will range from mild to severe
  • Pain may be experienced differently – For example: sharp, shock-like, shooting, etc
  • Numbness
  • Feeling of coldness
  • Tingling
  • Persistent numbness, tingling, or weakness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Insomnia

Neuropathic Pain Relief Treatments

First, your doctor will attempt to find the cause of the Neuropathy. Tests such as an MRI and Electromyography are conducted. If a cause is discovered, such as a herniated disc as the central cause of the pain, the appropriate measures are taken.

If no obvious cause is discovered, your doctor will focus on prescribing an effective pain relief method. The pain relief will depend on the individual and the severity of the neuropathy. Treatment options typically include medications, an active method of recovery such as physical therapy, and spinal cord stimulation for more complex cases.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5 Coping Skills for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain not only affects the body, it also affects the mind. While medical treatments for chronic pain are essential, they work best when combined with mental and emotional coping skills.

Skill 1: Learning

When diagnosed with a chronic pain condition, learning about the condition can ease the fear of the unknown. Individuals should be well-educated by a physician or other reputable resource(s) about their condition and treatment plan.

Participating in self-management education (SME) programs for chronic health conditions may also be helpful. These programs teach chronic pain management strategies that help to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. More information can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

Skill 2: Accepting

Acceptance of chronic pain does not mean giving up or not investing any effort to reduce pain and increase quality of life. Instead, acceptance of a chronic pain diagnosis means recognizing the reality of the condition, which eases the emotional struggle with the situation. Acceptance of chronic pain allows individuals to focus on management and treatment.

Accepting chronic pain is a challenging skill that may be best addressed with a counselor or therapist. Both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have proven to be effective treatments for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

Skill 3: Relaxing

Relaxing while in pain can be challenging, but it is possible. Persistent pain can increase stress, and stress can increase chronic pain. It can become a vicious cycle.

Various relaxation techniques and practices, such as mindfulness, yoga, tai chi, diaphragmatic breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, can decrease the stress response, which can reduce chronic pain. Relaxation tapes, online tutorials or videos may also be helpful.

Biofeedback can also help with relaxation. During biofeedback training, a professional uses technology to help individuals learn to control bodily functions, such as heart rate and muscle tension. Once these skills are mastered, they can be practiced without the use of technology.

Skill 4: Pacing

Activity pacing is a skill in which individuals learn to pace themselves throughout the day in order to conserve energy and prevent increased pain. This often involves dividing large tasks into smaller ones. It can also include adjusting schedules. For example, if an event or activity is scheduled for the evening, activity pacing throughout the day helps conserve energy both physically and mentally.

Skill 5: Coping

The skill of coping involves using treatment tools, distraction techniques and learned skills when pain becomes severe. Coping treatment methods include taking pain medication, using hot and cold therapy, applying topical creams, getting a massage, etc.

Distraction techniques can also help individuals cope by focusing attention away from negative or painful thoughts. Watching a favorite movie, talking to a friend, or participating in a hobby or pastime are all examples of distractions.

It is important to note that even when these coping skills are mastered, unusual levels or unfamiliar types of pain should be discussed with a physician.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Treatment, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Manage Pain when Stuck at Home

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, patients with chronic diseases can find that stay-at-home orders pose added challenges. In many areas, medical care has been pared down to mostly urgent doctor visits, procedures, surgeries, and diagnostic tests. Many pain patients may find access to medical care or treatment more limited than ever. And stay-at-home orders can also mean spending more time around spouses, family members, or roommates, which can add even more stress to what is already a very high-anxiety situation.

If you are finding that being sequestered at home seems to be making your pain management all the more difficult, here is some food for thought to help you work through this time period:

  • Telemedicine and telehealth are part of the new normal right now. Physicians are relying on telemedicine more than ever during this pandemic, and there seems to be a rise in other virtual health and wellness services being offered. Besides having your typical doctor visit handled on-line or by telephone, you can also look for other complementary virtual resources from physical therapists, psychological counselors and therapists, life-coaches, yoga instructors, Pilates trainers, and nutritionists. For more social bonding, consider joining an on-line support group. Finding the right telemedicine and telehealth resources for your particular situation can be tricky, and it is always a good idea to talk to your physician first before starting something new.
  • Staying at home can easily break down the normal structure and boundaries that we are typically accustomed to. Not leaving home to go to work or run the usual errands can mean more idle time at home. Try to combat this by creating a schedule and some structure around your day that jives with others who are home with you. For example, schedule time to do things together, like perhaps preparing meals, cleaning the house, and watching a movie, while carving out room for everyone to have some time for themselves. Now might be harder than ever to find the time and space for self-care activities like meditation or exercise, so consider working out a plan with your house-mates that allows you to have important time for you.
  • There are some medical treatments that need to be put on hold right now. For example, most experts are recommending postponing routine pain procedures like epidural cortisone injections. In addition to the added risk of being at a medical facility during this time, there is also hypothetical risk that exposing the body to added cortisone could diminish its immune response. If there are medical treatments or procedures that have been put on hold that you typically rely on for pain relief, then this can be a trying time for you. But letting your angst get the best of you during this time period will only make your pain that much harder to control, so consider adding specific stress management techniques and relaxation tools to your routine at home.
  • Stepping outside of your usual routine can also be a chance to explore new ideas or treatments that you may have not otherwise considered. Never talked to a pain management psychologist before? Perhaps this is a time to give it a try. Research done on telemedicine counseling has looked pretty good so far. There might be a list of things that you have always wanted to look into but never had the time. This might be the opportunity for growth, development, and exploration that you’ve been waiting for.

While staying at home is what is needed right now, this can be a really challenging time for those with chronic pain. Consider re-calibrating your pain management strategies so you can get back on track.

Article Provided By: WebMD

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Spouses Cope with Chronic Pain

Taking on the role of caregiver is all too often placed upon an individual due to uncontrollable circumstances. When put in the position of being caregiver, there are certain suggestions that may help caregivers cope when their spouse develops chronic pain.

Finding the Right Doctor

Researching different doctors to find the most optimal match may be the first step. A list of doctors should be made, and both the caregiver and spouse should go through the list. The top 3 doctors should be selected, and appointments should be made for each so that multiple opinions may be given.

Once appointment day arrives, caregivers should follow these suggestions:

  • Dress nicely
  • Make it known that they are the caregiver
  • Take notes
  • Be prepared with questions

Questions that should be asked to the doctor:

  • Doctor’s experience with pain management
  • Doctor’s philosophy on pain management
  • Methods of pain management that they offer
  • Number of doctors on site
  • Best way to make appointments
  • Point of contact Doctor or physician’s assistant

Day-to-Day with Chronic Pain

Since change will happen quickly, here are a few tips to help with the transition:

  • Create a list of all medications
  • Note the time of day for taking medications
  • Create a rapport with your local pharmacist
  • People should be sure to listen and acknowledge the struggle faced by their spouse

The caregiver should remember to not forget themselves:

The road ahead of both caregiver and spouse will be long but they should not be discouraged down the road. Though the caregiver should show compassion to their spouse, they should not judge themselves harshly when feelings of hopelessness surface. While it is important for a caregiver to look after their spouse, they should not forget to treat themselves well in the process.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Distraction Techniques for Chronic Pain

While medical treatments are essential when dealing with chronic pain, various complementary techniques are also available to combat pain. One of these valuable techniques is distraction.

Benefits of distraction

Focusing on pain can increase the perception of pain. It can also negatively affect an individual’s mood and increase feelings of helplessness. Changing that focus by using distraction not only prevents the focus-based increase in pain perception, but may actually reduce levels of pain.

Research on distraction techniques

Considerable research has been done on the use of distraction techniques as a tool for coping with pain, sometimes known as distraction analgesia. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University found that focusing on a task created distraction analgesia in many individuals with chronic pain. Dr. Ted Jones found that distraction decreased pain in 90 percent of his patients, usually by 20 to 50 percent. Distraction techniques have proven to be so effective that health care providers at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford currently use distraction-based virtual reality therapy with pediatric patients to reduce their pain and anxiety.

Suggestions for distraction

Individuals can try distraction to reduce their pain levels when they find themselves focusing solely on their pain. Engaging in an enjoyable activity provides distraction while also emphasizing the positive aspects of life. Participating in a hobby or a favorite pastime with family or friends prevents isolation and also provides distraction. Activities that require intense concentration, such as puzzles, games or skill tests, are also an effective way to divert attention away from pain.

Using distraction techniques helps provide individuals with a greater sense of control over their pain, which can improve mental well-being. Distraction can play a significant role in how individuals cope with chronic pain on a daily basis.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Types of Massages for Chronic Pain

Why Massage Therapy for Chronic Pain?

Massage therapy is turning out to be more broadly accepted as a dependable treatment for many types of chronic pain within the medical community. It is also accepted as an adjunct to other medical treatments. In general, massage is rarely given as the primary or sole treatment for pain management. It is often employed as one factor of therapy and to aid in preparing the patient to partake in exercise or other treatment methods. Regardless, massage can be an essential and operative component of your pain management routine.

Massages have been revealed to be especially effective in mitigating back pain. Due to the fact that back pain is a component of a wide array of pain conditions, massage is often considered to be beneficial to the healing process. Moreover, different types of massage will be useful for different segments of the body. Specifically, acupressure and shiatsu are intended to relieve different types of pain in different regions. Neuromuscular treatment is typically beneficial in relieving “referred” pain, which is pain that is activated by one part on the body, but is felt in an entirely different area.

Benefits of Massage Therapy

In general, benefits of massage therapy include: increased blood flow and enhanced circulation; muscle relaxation which subsequently improves range of motion; increased endorphin levels; improved sleep and lessened bouts of insomnia. Enjoy this quick summary on various types of massage that may be appropriate for you.

Swedish Massages

This is the most popular type of massage, therefore, most research regarding the benefits of massage have utilized Swedish massage techniques. It is important to note that Swedish massage is very gentle and does not target precise pain points or apply deep pressure. It is widely recognized as being highly relaxing which is excellent for sufferers of acute or chronic pain. Despite how mild Swedish massage is, it enhances blood flow and thus can aid in the removal of excess lactic acid from muscles, thereby helping alleviate muscle pain.

Neuromuscular Massages

This type of massage therapy is also known as “trigger point” massage due to the fact that it targets regions of tension and muscular spasm in the back. The massage therapist directs pressure to a particular region of interest. Neuromuscular massage can sometimes cause soreness at the outset since the focus of its pressure is directly on tender regions. Be sure to communicate with your therapist to identify the appropriate pressure. Similar to Swedish massage, neuromuscular massage also works to flush lactic acid out of the muscles to alleviate pain.

Acupressure

This type of massage stimulates vital spots on the body to impede pain sensations and stimulate the natural pain relievers of the body. In general, the best approach for pain relief is to apply sustained pressure on vital points for one to three minutes. This pressure is applied by using hands, fingers, or other devices.

Shiatsu

This form of massage is very similar to acupressure, as the word shiatsu literally means “finger pressure”. The primary difference is that practitioners of shiatsu do not use their full hand to apply pressure – only the fingers are used.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Psychological

Psychological Effects of Chronic Pain

The fact of the matter is that chronic pain wears on you. It’s difficult to bear not only physically, but mentally. Since more than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, the psychological effects of pervasive pain are far reaching in our society. Understanding the psychological issues that accompany chronic pain is important for pain specialists and patients alike.

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’s five stages of grief have been used to break down and describe the experiences of people when they are grieving, giving a name and potentially helping people cope with feelings that seem all-powerful when you’re experiencing them. Chronic pain, both the diagnosis and experience, presents similar emotional upheaval. One PsyD, a Doctor Jennifer Martin, created the ‘7 stages of Chronic Pain and Illness’ to offer pain sufferers and physicians with a similar delineation. It’s important to remember that a person may experience these stages out of order or may circle back to an earlier stage. She describes them as follows:

Denial

When people realize that their pain may not be going away, it’s tough to swallow. They often experience shock and denial, which may prevent them from seeking out the help that they need to obtain proper treatment.

Pleading, Bargaining, and Desperation

Patients in this stage look for anything that may fix their condition or act as a bandage. They often bargain, either with themselves or a God, to make it better, all the while blaming themselves and experiencing tremendous guilt.

Anger

Once people understand that there’s no magical fix for their condition, they often experience anger. They may be mad at anyone related to their condition, including family, friends, care providers, employers, and anyone else they can tie their decline to.

Anxiety and Depression

Living with chronic pain can be scary and may bring on anxiety. It may also lead to depression. This occurs when a person feels hopeless, exhausted, and experience intense grief. This depression isn’t necessarily a mental illness, but an appropriate reaction to this type of change.

Loss of Self and Confusion

Chronic pain may lead to patients losing an integral part of their life. They may not be able to do the things they once did any longer, which can lead to an identity crisis of sorts.

Reevaluation of Life, Roles, and Goals

At this stage, people begin to come to terms with potential limitations and life changes. They begin to find a way to live their life within their new normal. Changing expectations of what things should be can help chronic pain patients find happiness despite their condition.

Acceptance

This doesn’t necessarily mean being alright with the way things are now. It simply means they’ve accepted the reality of their condition and are taking steps to live within that reality. It means choosing to move forward despite chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Optimizing Productivity with Chronic Pain

On average, employees that suffer from chronic pain undergo five hours of non-productivity in one week. When this figure is averaged over one year, it amounts to a loss of $5,000 in productivity for each employee.

5 tips to be more productive

1. Know your triggers and the way to deal with them

A majority of individuals with chronic pain have particular triggers. If you have been dealing with it for a long time, it becomes easier to figure out the things that worsen such pain. Using this information, you can stay away from all the triggers and work easily.

2. Never give up

You might think that living with pain for such a long time will definitely make you lose all hope. This is where you’re wrong! Ask your doctor for continuous treatment and try to find out the cause of the pain regardless of the time it takes. Instead of lowering your expectations, start raising them up.

3. Stand up for yourself

In order to work efficiently, while dealing with chronic pain, you need to advocate for yourself. Inform the people around you if you feel a migraine coming. Asking your employer for some time off for rest is better than doing a bad job and then having the people you work with question you. Remember, no one else can speak on your behalf.

4. Adopt healthy habits

Each case of chronic pain is different, and there are possible reasons for almost every ache that you feel. However, there are people that experience undiagnosed pains and aches. For such people, the best thing is to adopt a healthy style.

Try your best to maintain a balanced and healthy diet, and remove all processed foods. Remove harmful chemicals from you home, like household cleaners. Don’t forget to keep yourself hydrated.

Of course, leave bad habits like excessive drinking and smoking behind. Start exercising for half an hour each day. These simple changes in a lifestyle will help you feel mentally and physically better.

5. Look for an understanding employer

Having an employer that understands your condition is vital. Working for a person that has dealt with chronic pain also makes working with your chronic pain condition cope-able because they are likely to show understanding and compassion, as well as be ready to help you.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
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