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What And Where Are Dermatomes?

What and where are dermatomes?

Dermatomes are areas of skin that send signals to the brain through the spinal nerves. These signals give rise to sensations involving temperature, pressure, and pain.
The part of a nerve that exits the spinal cord is called the nerve root. Damage to a nerve root can trigger symptoms in the nerve’s corresponding dermatome.
Below, we show the locations of the dermatomes throughout the body. We also describe health conditions that can damage the spinal nerves and affect their dermatomes.

What are they?

A dermatome is an area of skin that sends information to the brain via a single spinal nerve.
Spinal nerves exit the spine in pairs. There are 31 pairs in total, and 30 of these have corresponding dermatomes.
The exception is the C1 spinal nerve, which does not have a corresponding dermatome.
The spinal nerves are classified into five groups, according to the region of the spine from which they exit.
The five groups and their points of exit from the spine are:
Cervical nerves: These exit the neck region and are labeled C1–C8.
Thoracic nerves: These exit the torso region and are labeled T1–T12.
Lumbar nerves: These exit the lower back region and are labeled L1–L5.
Sacral nerves: These exit the base of the spine and are labeled S1–S5.
A coccygeal nerve pair: These exit the tailbone, or coccyx.

Locations of the dermatomes
Each dermatome shares the label of its corresponding spinal nerve.
Some dermatomes overlap to a certain extent, and the precise layout of the dermatomes can vary slightly from one person to the next.
Below, we list the locations of the dermatomes that correspond to the spinal nerves in each group.
Cervical nerves and their dermatomes
C2: the base of the skull, behind the ear
C3: the back of the head and the upper neck
C4: the lower neck and upper shoulders
C5: the upper shoulders and the two collarbones
C6: the upper forearms and the thumbs and index fingers
C7: the upper back, backs of the arms, and middle fingers
C8: the upper back, inner arms, and ring and pinky fingers
Thoracic nerves and their dermatomes
T1: the upper chest and back and upper forearm
T2, T3, and T4: the upper chest and back
T5, T6, and T7: the mid-chest and back
T8 and T9: the upper abdomen and mid-back
T10: the midline of the abdomen and the mid-back
T11 and T12: the lower abdomen and mid-back
Lumbar nerves and their dermatomes
L1: the groin, upper hips, and lower back
L2: the lower back, hips, and tops of the inner thighs
L3: the lower back, inner thighs, and inner legs just below the knees
L4: the backs of the knees, inner sections of the lower legs, and the heels
L5: the tops of the feet and the fronts of the lower legs
Sacral nerves and their dermatomes
S1: the lower back, buttocks, backs of the legs, and outer toes
S2: the buttocks, genitals, backs of the legs, and heels
S3: the buttocks and genitals
S4 and S5: the buttocks
The coccygeal nerves and their dermatome
The dermatome corresponding with the coccygeal nerves is located on the buttocks, in the area directly around the tailbone, or coccyx.

Associated health conditions
Symptoms that occur within a dermatome sometimes indicate damage or disruption to the dermatome’s corresponding nerve. The location of these symptoms can, therefore, help doctors diagnose certain underlying medical conditions.
Some conditions that can affect the nerves and their corresponding dermatomes are:
Shingles
Shingles, or herpes zoster, is a viral infection caused by the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus. This is the same virus that causes chickenpox.
After the body recovers from chickenpox, the virus can lie dormant and eventually reactivate as shingles.
In adults, shingles typically causes a rash to form on the trunk, along one of the thoracic dermatomes. The rash may be preceded by pain, itching, or tingling in the area.
Some other symptoms of shingles can include:
a headache
sensitivity to bright light
a general feeling of being unwell
A person with a weakened immune system may develop a more widespread shingles rash that covers three or more dermatomes. Doctors refer to this as disseminated zoster.
Pinched nerves
A pinched nerve occurs when a nerve root has become compressed by a bone, disc, tendon, or ligament. This compression can occur anywhere along the spine, but it usually occurs in the lower, or lumbar, region.
A pinched nerve can cause pain, tingling, or numbness in its corresponding dermatome. As such, the location of the symptoms can help a doctor identify the affected nerve.

The doctor then diagnoses and treats the underlying cause of the pinched nerve and recommends ways to relieve the symptoms.
Traumatic injury
A traumatic injury to the nerves may result from an accident or surgery.
The severity of symptoms can help doctors determine the extent of the nerve injury.

Summary
Dermatomes are areas of skin, each of which is connected to a single spinal nerve. Together, these areas create a surface map of the body.
Dysfunction or damage to a spinal nerve can trigger symptoms in the corresponding dermatome. Nerves damage or dysfunction may result from infection, compression, or traumatic injury.
Doctors can sometimes use the severity of symptoms in a dermatome to determine the extent and location of nerve damage. They then work to diagnose and treat the underlying cause of the damage.

Article Provided By: medicalnewstoday

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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What’s Causing My Lower Back and Leg Pain?

What’s Causing My Lower Back and Leg Pain?

Back pain is a common ailment and the leading cause of job-related disability. It can equally affect men and women, ranging in intensity from a mild ache lasting a few days to intense, chronic pain lasting for weeks at a time.
Though often caused by muscle strain and normal wear and tear of the body, back pain may also be a symptom of more serious conditions. In some cases, back pain can extend to other areas of the body, specifically to your legs.
Other symptoms associated with back and leg pain include:
burning sensations
tingling
being sore to the touch
limited mobility
Here are some causes of lower back and leg pain.
Sciatica
Often the result of a herniated disk, sciatica is a form of pain that radiates along the sciatic nerve. Your sciatic nerve extends from your lower back, through your hips and butt, and down your legs. If you experience sciatica pain, it will typically occur on one side of your body.
Common symptoms associated with sciatica include:
pain radiating from your lower spine down the back of your leg
sharp jolts of pain in the affected areas
burning sensations
muscle weakness
numbness
trouble controlling your bladder or bowels
Self-care, exercise, and proper posture can usually improve sciatica symptoms. If your condition doesn’t improve, your doctor may prescribe muscle relaxants or anti-inflammatories to reduce pain and discomfort.
In some cases, your doctor may inject steroids into the area surrounding your sciatic nerve to alleviate pain. If your sciatic pain begins to cause weakness or affects your quality of life, surgery may be the best treatment. Always consult with your doctor before pursuing treatment options.

Lumbar herniated disk
A lumbar herniated disk is a ruptured disk in your lower back. It occurs when the nucleus or “jelly” is pushed out of your spinal disk through a tear. The ruptured disk puts pressure on a spinal nerve that can cause severe pain, numbness, and sometimes weakness.
Other symptoms associated with a lumbar herniated disk include:
persistent back pain worsened by standing, coughing, or sneezing
back spasms
decreased reflexes at the knee or ankle
leg muscle weakness
numbness in leg and foot
spinal cord compression
Treatments vary depending on the severity of the damage. In minor cases, doctors may recommend rest, pain medication, and, sometimes, acupuncture. If symptoms don’t improve within a few weeks, your doctor may recommend physical therapy or surgery.

Piriformis syndrome
The piriformis is a flat, band-like muscle found in your glutes near the top of your hip joint. The piriformis helps to stabilize your hip joint, and lifts and rotates your thigh away from your body.
Piriformis syndrome is a neurological disorder that occurs when your piriformis muscle compresses your sciatic nerve.
Common symptoms associated with piriformis syndrome include:
pain extending to your lower leg
tingling
numbness in your buttocks
Treatment involves pain relief and avoiding pain triggers such as certain sitting positions and strenuous physical activities.
Your doctor may recommend rest, hot and cold treatments, and physical therapy to increase your mobility. Surgery is a last resort, but may be required in severe circumstances.

Arachnoiditis
The arachnoid is a membrane that protects spinal cord nerves. Inflammation or irritation of the arachnoid can cause the pain disorder arachnoiditis. In many cases, people who have arachnoiditis experience pain in the lower back and legs, as it affects the nerves in those areas.
The more common symptom of this condition is a stinging, burning pain. Other symptoms associated with arachnoiditis include:
tingling or numbness, specifically in the legs
“skin-crawling” sensations
muscle cramps
twitching
bowel or bladder dysfunction
Though there’s no complete cure for arachnoiditis, treatments focus on pain management. Your doctor may prescribe pain medication or recommend physiotherapy and exercise. Surgery isn’t recommended for this condition because it can increase the risk of scar tissue formation.

Radiating back and leg pain are often symptoms of more serious medical conditions. While in some cases pain may improve within a few days, some conditions can cause debilitating pain for weeks at a time.
If you begin to experience regular, daily pain or worsening symptoms, seek immediate medical attention. Discuss treatment options with your doctor to ensure the best quality of life.

Article Provided By: healthline

 

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Foods That Fight Neuropathy

Foods That Fight Neuropathy
By Karen Spaeder Updated November 13, 2019
Reviewed by Rachel MacPherson, BA, CPT

 

If you have a nerve disorder, a neuropathy diet can help improve your nervous system’s functioning.

Neuropathy, also known as peripheral neuropathy, is a condition resulting from damage to the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. With diabetes being one of its most common causes, a neuropathy diet and certain neuropathy dietary supplements can help prevent and manage the condition.

To support nerve health, the Mayo Clinic recommends eating foods for neuropathy, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. Eating this way is also considered a healthy eating pattern, per the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and will help to prevent many other chronic conditions and diseases. Work with your doctor to find the best foods and any neuropathy dietary supplements that may be best for you.

While diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy, it can also result from traumatic injuries, infections, metabolic problems, inherited causes or toxin exposure. Symptoms may vary based on the type of nerves affected, as each nerve in the peripheral system has a unique function, explains the Mayo Clinic:
Sensory nerves receive sensations from the skin, such as temperature, pain, vibration or touch. If sensory nerves are affected, you may experience sharp or burning pain, extreme sensitivity to touch or numbness and tingling in the hands and feet.
Motor nerves control muscle movement. If motor nerves are affected, you may feel muscle weakness, paralysis or a lack of coordination and frequent falls.
Autonomic nerves control blood pressure, heart rate, digestion, the bladder and other functions in the body. If autonomic nerves are affected, you may experience heat intolerance, changes in blood pressure or bowel, bladder or digestive problems.
Most people with peripheral neuropathy have polyneuropathy, whereby many different nerves are affected by the condition. If left untreated, neuropathy can have detrimental long-term effects, such as reduced feeling, problems moving and urinary incontinence.
Foods for Neuropathy
If you have a nerve disorder, a neuropathy diet can help improve your nervous system’s functioning, according to the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. Incorporate the following foods for neuropathy into your diet, focusing on whole foods in their least processed form:
Five to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily
Whole grains like brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat and millet
Legumes such as black beans, chickpeas and fava beans
Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids like fish, flax seeds and chia seeds
Lean proteins like chicken and turkey
Low-fat or nonfat dairy, such as milk and yogurt
Avoid alcohol on a neuropathy diet, as it can have a toxic effect on nerve tissue. Limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams per day, according to the Dietary Guidelines. In addition, avoid any foods with added sugars and saturated fats. Opt instead for monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Nutrients for Neuropathy
According to the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy, specific nutrients work to support nerve health and can help manage or prevent neuropathy symptoms, such as those listed below.
B vitamins, including B1 and B12: An October 2014 study published in the journal Continuum found that deficiency of B1, aka thiamine, may lead to neuropathy involving the cranial nerves. B1 sources include asparagus, sunflower seeds, green peas, flaxseeds and Brussels sprouts. B12 sources include salmon, trout, canned tuna, sardines, yogurt and 100 percent fortified breakfast cereal.
Folic acid (vitamin B11)/Folate: Sources may include citrus fruits, bananas, peas, beans, romaine lettuce, cucumber, spinach, asparagus and broccoli.
Antioxidants: Aim for a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, including berries, cherries, oranges, grapefruit, red grapes, kiwi, watermelon, tomatoes, spinach, kale, broccoli, onions and bell peppers.
In addition to the the B vitamins mentioned above, an August 2018 report in the journal Clinical Obesity points to vitamin B6, vitamin E and copper as being important for optimal functioning of the nervous system.
You’ll want to watch your caloric intake, too. The USDA recommends filling half your plate with vegetables and fruits, one-fourth with whole grains and one-fourth with lean protein.
Meal planning and shopping the perimeter of grocery stores will help you choose the healthiest foods — if it’s in a box in the center aisles, it’s likely unhealthy. Read the nutrition labels on any packaged foods to be sure you’re selecting foods with ingredients that support nerve health.
If your doctor recommends neuropathy dietary supplements, make sure you’re taking the correct daily dose for optimal nerve health. You may wish to portion them out into a weekly pill organizer to make it easy to stay on track.

Article Provided By: livestrong.com
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

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Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Relief, Chronic Pain, Chronic Pain Therapy, Pain Therpy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Treating Nerve Pain Caused by Cancer, HIV, and Other Conditions

Treating Nerve Pain Caused by Cancer, HIV, and Other Conditions

Nerve pain can be a symptom of many different conditions, including cancer, HIV, diabetes, and shingles. For some, nerve pain is frustrating; for others, nerve pain is devastating and life-changing.
Whether it feels like burning, pinpricks, or sudden shocks of electricity, nerve pain can disrupt your life at home and at work. It can limit your ability to get around. Over time, it can grind you down. Studies show that people with nerve pain have higher rates of sleep problems, anxiety, and depression.
When you have a serious medical condition such as cancer or HIV, dealing with the additional misery of nerve pain can be especially hard. But there is good news. While nerve pain can’t always be cured, it can be treated — and there are a lot of good options available.
If you’re struggling with nerve pain caused by diabetes, cancer, HIV or another condition, here are some answers.

What Causes Nerve Pain?
Countless nerves in the body convey sensations to the brain, including pain. While we might not like pain much, it does have an important function: it prevents injury. When your foot begins to step on a nail, it’s the pain sensation that alerts your brain to the danger.
That’s how it’s supposed to work, at least. But in people with nerve pain, that messaging system isn’t working correctly. Your brain receives a pain signal, and you feel the pain, but there’s no obvious cause. Now, it’s just pain without a purpose — and because of this, there’s no immediate way to relieve it. Since you can’t take away the external threat (there isn’t one), you have to treat the internal source of the pain or the experience.
What makes the nerves behave this way? Usually, it’s damage from a physical injury or disease.
Degenerative joint or disc disease in the spine with spinal cord or nerve compression are very common causes that nerve pain. Also a herniated disc can cause nerve pain.
Cancer and other tumors can cause nerve pain. As they grow, tumors can press on the surrounding nerves. Cancers can also grow out of the nerves themselves. Sometimes, treatments for cancer — such as chemotherapy drugs — can damage the nerves, leading to pain.
HIV can cause painful nerve damage. Nerve pain affects up to one-third of people with HIV, and nerve pain in the hands and feet is often the first symptom that appears. Treatment with antiretroviral drugs can also lead to nerve damage that causes pain.
Diabetes is a common cause of nerve damage in the U.S. Over time, high levels of glucose in the blood (blood sugar) can injure the nerves.
Shingles can be followed by a painful condition called postherpetic neuralgia. This type of nerve pain can be particularly severe and sudden.
Physical injuries can result in nerves that are compressed, crushed, or severed.
These are only a few examples of diseases and conditions that can cause nerve damage and nerve pain. Others include repetitive stress, vitamin deficiencies, hormone imbalances, heart disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Lyme disease, alcoholism, and more. In some cases, nerve pain develops for no apparent reason.
Nerve Pain Symptoms
Symptoms of nerve damage can vary from person to person. Sometimes, the nerves become hypersensitive. Something that normally feels painless — a breeze on your arm, the sensation of a bed sheet on your body — becomes painful.
Damage to the sensory nerves doesn’t only cause pain. It can also result in:
Numbness
Tingling
Pricking
Loss of reflexes
In extreme cases, nerve damage can cause paralysis and affect things like digestion and breathing.
The severity of nerve pain is usually linked to the severity of the underlying disease. So in general, nerve pain tends to be worse as people get older.
Diagnosing Nerve Pain
If you think you might have nerve pain, you need to see your doctor now. Sometimes, the cause might be fairly clear, especially if you have already been diagnosed with a condition known to cause nerve pain, like HIV, cancer, or diabetes.
But in other cases, the cause of nerve pain can be hard to sort out. Because so many conditions can trigger nerve pain, your doctor might need to run a number of lab tests. You’ll also need a thorough neurological exam, and possibly other tests — like CT scans, MRIs, nerve conduction studies and electromyographies. Sometimes, a doctor will recommend a biopsy of the skin or a nerve to examine the nerve endings.
Treating Nerve Pain
When nerve pain is caused by a condition like diabetes, HIV or cancer, getting treatment for the underlying disease is obviously the priority.
But treatments for the underlying disease might not necessarily help with your pain. Nerve pain may need its own treatment, separate from treatment for the disease that’s causing it.
The most effective and suitable treatment for nerve pain varies, because it depends on the specifics — like the patient’s health, the underlying cause, the risks of potential side effects, and the costs. However, doctors generally use the same set of treatments for nerve pain, whether it is caused by cancer, HIV, diabetes, or another condition. Here’s a rundown of the basic options.
Topical treatments. Some over-the-counter and prescription topical treatments — like creams, lotions, gels, and patches — can ease nerve pain. They tend to work best for pain that’s isolated in specific areas on your skin.
Anticonvulsants. These drugs were originally developed to treat epilepsy, but some also help control nerve pain. To boost their effects, they are often used in combination with antidepressants. They might not work as well with all types of nerve pain.
Antidepressants . Certain types of antidepressants can help with nerve pain. Studies have shown that using them along with anticonvulsants may have bigger benefits than using them alone. However, some studies have indicated that while tricyclic antidepressants may help with diabetic nerve pain, they might not help with nerve pain caused by HIV or cancer chemotherapy.
Painkillers. Powerful opioid painkillers might be a first choice for people with especially severe pain or nerve pain caused by cancer. However, for other kinds of nerve pain, doctors generally try anti-inflammatories, over the counter pain relievers, antidepressants and/or anticonvulsants first. Opioids can have serious side effects with a real potential for addiction. Over-the-counter painkillers may not work very well for moderate to severe nerve pain.
Electrical stimulation. A number of treatments use electrical impulses to block the pain messages sent by damaged nerves. These include TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS.) Both are noninvasive and painless. Some other electrical stimulation approaches are more complex and require surgery.
Other techniques. For nerve pain caused by bones or discs in your back, epidural injections with steroid can be very helpful. (There is a little lidocaine=anestheic in them, but mostly it’s the steroids that help.)
Complementary treatments. Many people find that alternative approaches — like acupuncture, meditation, and massage — can help relieve nerve pain. If you’re interested in dietary supplements for nerve pain, talk to your doctor first.
Lifestyle changes. While they won’t cure nerve pain, making some changes to your habits could help you feel better and ease some of your discomfort. Exercising more, eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking, and making time to practice relaxation techniques could all help.
The Costs of Untreated Nerve Pain
Nerve pain can make you feel terribly alone. After all, it’s not an injury that your family or friends can see. You might feel frustrated if they can’t understand what you’re feeling.
But while you might feel alone, you’re not. Experts believe that 40 million Americans are living with nerve pain. The impact of nerve pain is tremendous. Both the costs to the healthcare system as well as loss of wages and productivity are staggering.
Despite the significant price of nerve pain and the millions of people living with it, experts think that it is still underdiagnosed and undertreated. Studies show that even people who do seek out treatment often aren’t getting the right treatment. Too many rely on drugs that are unlikely to help.
So if you have nerve pain — whether it’s caused by diabetes, cancer, HIV, shingles, or another condition — you need to treat it seriously. Don’t assume that it will go away on its own. Don’t assume that following the treatment for the underlying disease will resolve it. Instead, talk to your doctor about treating your nerve pain directly.
WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on July 31, 2020

Article Provided By: webmd
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Scrambler Therapy For Chemotherapy Neuropathy

Clinical Trial
Support Care Cancer
. 2020 Mar;28(3):1183-1197. doi: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3. Epub 2019 Jun 17.
Scrambler therapy for chemotherapy neuropathy: a randomized phase II pilot trial
Charles Loprinzi 1 , Jennifer G Le-Rademacher 2 , Neil Majithia 2 , Ryan P McMurray 2 , Carrie R O’Neill 2 , Markus A Bendel 2 , Andreas Beutler 2 , Daniel H Lachance 2 , Andrea Cheville 2 , David M Strick 2 , David F Black 2 , Jon C Tilburt 2 , Thomas J Smith 2
Affiliations Expand
PMID: 31209630 DOI: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3
Abstract
Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a prominent clinical problem, with limited effective therapies. Preliminary non-randomized clinical trial data support that Scrambler Therapy is helpful in this situation.
Methods: Patients were eligible if they had CIPN symptoms for at least 3 months and CIPN-related tingling or pain at least 4/10 in severity during the week prior to registration. They were randomized to receive Scrambler Therapy versus transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for 2 weeks. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were utilized to measure efficacy and toxicity daily for 2 weeks during therapy and then weekly for 8 additional weeks.
Results: This study accrued 50 patients, 25 to each of the 2 study arms; 46 patients were evaluable. There were twice as many Scrambler-treated patients who had at least a 50% documented improvement during the 2 treatment weeks, from their baseline pain, tingling, and numbness scores, when compared with the TENS-treated patients (from 36 to 56% compared with 16-28% for each symptom). Global Impression of Change scores for “neuropathy symptoms,” pain, and quality of life were similarly improved during the treatment weeks. Patients in the Scrambler group were more likely than those in the TENS group to recommend their treatment to other patients, during both the 2-week treatment period and the 8-week follow-up period (p < 0.0001). Minimal toxicity was observed.
Conclusions: The results from this pilot trial were positive, supporting the conduct of further investigations regarding the use of Scrambler Therapy for treating CIPN.
Keywords: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy; Scrambler; TENS.

Article Provided By: pubmed
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

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The Ideal Diet For Reducing Neuropathy Symptoms

The Ideal Diet For Reducing Neuropathy Symptoms

Written by Marriane Sokolowska
Last updated: September 11th, 2019 06:27 pm

If you suffer from neuropathy, then you will probably have considered many different remedies and medicine.
However, it is also likely that you haven’t yet considered the importance of a good diet to help you manage your symptoms and perhaps even reverse some of the damage.
There is, however, more and more research to demonstrate that there is a direct link between the foods we eat and our nervous system, both positive and negative.

Importance of Good Nutrition for Preventing Neuropathy
In fact, the first line of defense when it comes to preventative medicine is good nutrition, and the same is true for peripheral neuropathy.
Once you have developed it, diet continues to be important in terms of managing and reducing your symptoms, and even healing your nerves.
Neuropathy is often caused by other conditions, most notably diabetes, so it is very important that you control your blood sugar level in order to avoid neuropathy. Similarly, excessive alcohol consumption can lead to certain vitamin B deficiencies, again leading to neuropathy.
Regardless of whether you have neuropathy, cancer, diabetes, an addiction disorder, or any other problem, it is important that you should eat a diet rich in lean protein, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.

Keep A Food Diary
You may also want to consider keeping a food diary, particularly if you have neuropathy, as this will help you to identify which foods make you feel better, or worse.
Neuropathy can be improved or worsened depending on what you eat. There are foods that can cause further damage to the nerves, weakening them even more. It is important, therefore, to know not just what to eat, but also what to avoid in order to stop your tingling, numbness, and/or nerve pain from getting worse.
At the same time, you can consume foods that make your nerves stronger, thereby improving your existing condition and avoiding it from getting any worse.
In fact, there are even foods that can help to repair any nerves that have been damaged, which means you could get full relief of your symptoms. So what are the foods you really should include, and what should you avoid?
Foods to Include for Reducing Symptoms of Neuropathy
Ginger

This is surprising to many people but ginger is a strong, natural, pain reliever. This means that it can help you feel a lot better. Added to that, it contains gingerols, which have anti-inflammatory properties, thereby increasing mobility in people with serious and chronic pain and helping them to become more mobile.
Water

Water has to be a standard component of any healthy diet. It isn’t a miraculous healer in terms of neuropathy, but what it can do is provide relief from inflammation. This means that the pain you experience as part of neuropathy does not get any worse.
When you start to get dehydrated, your blood starts to thicken and your muscles go into spasm. As a result, inflammation occurs and affects areas where pain receptors and nerves are located. If you ensure that you are always hydrated, your overall bodily functions are better able to function as well, thereby increasing your overall well being.
Fruits and vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are filled with various minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and dietary fibers. Put together, these help to create a strong immune system while at the same time preventing and fighting disease and illness.
People who have neuropathy should increase their intake of fruits and vegetables immediately. Many people who have neuropathy also have diabetes, and eating plenty of fruits and vegetables means that you will also be better able to control the symptoms of diabetes.
You should try to eat at least five portions of different fruits and vegetables every day in order to see some real results. Try to choose those that have very high levels of antioxidants, including berries, cherries, grapefruit, oranges, Brussels sprouts, onions, and bell peppers.
Another great benefit of fruits and vegetables is that you can purchase them ready to eat. As a result, you don’t have to do a lot of work in the kitchen, which means you will feel much less stressed as well.
Lean protein

Lean protein is necessary for your body to be able to build and repair new tissue. It is important to stick to lean protein, however, so that you don’t eat too many animal fats. Good sources include low fat dairy and poultry, and people with peripheral or diabetic neuropathy should consider increasing their level of consumption.
Avoid eating processed foods, as well as foods with high trans and saturated fats, including deep fried foods, cheese, butter, whole milk, and fatty meat. Not only can these make your neuropathy worse, they can also lead to heart disease, high cholesterol, and diabetes.
You should try to add things like fish, tofu, yogurt, low fat milk, legumes, and skinless poultry to your diet, for balanced nutrition, for the best results. Lean protein is not just important to combat neuropathy, it is also has a positive influence on your blood sugar level.
Foods to Avoid
Peripheral and diabetic neuropathy can be caused or worsened by vitamin deficiencies, diabetes, traumatic injuries, alcoholism, and more. To treat it, you will often have to find a way to manage that underlying cause, which includes medication and therapy, but you should also take a close look to your diet as there are foods that can make it worse. These include:
Gluten

Avoid gluten, particularly, if you have celiac disease. If you are allergic to gluten, consuming it can trigger neuropathy or make symptoms much worse. Gluten can be found in any product made with baking, cake, wheat, or white flower. Hence, switch to gluten free if necessary.
Refined grains

These have a high glycemic level. This means that they significantly impact your blood sugar. You must be able to control your insulin and glucose levels if you are to control diabetic neuropathy in particular. In order to have a better glycemic impact on your diet, you should consume whole grains instead of refined grains
Sugar

This adds a lot of flavor to foods, but little to no nutrients. When you have a nutritional deficiency, it is much easier to experience neuropathy. You should eat lots of whole grains and vegetables and for that occasional sweet treat, fresh fruits.
Saturated fats

These are found mainly in whole fat dairy products and fatty meats. They can lead to inflammation, as well as increasing your chance of having type 2 diabetes.
Final Thoughts
Due to a number of factors, including the amount of toxins in our environment and the poor mineral quality of our soil, the foods we eat are becoming less nutrient dense than in previous generations.
Therefore, it is vital to not only eat organic fruits and vegetables like those listed above, but to also take supplements with your diet to get the proper vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that support optimal nerve health.
You may, for even better effects, also want to consider supplementing your diet with a product like Nerve Renew which is designed for supporting healthy nerves and reducing pain.

 

Article Provided By: nervepaintreatment

Image By: David Dewitt
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CRPS

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome, is a chronic pain condition in which high levels of nerve impulses are sent to an affected site. Experts believe that CRPS occurs as a result of dysfunction in the central or peripheral nervous systems.
CRPS is most common in people ages 20-35. The syndrome also can occur in children; it affects women more often than men.
There is no cure for CRPS.

What Causes Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?
CRPS most likely does not have a single cause; rather, it results from multiple causes that produce similar symptoms. Some theories suggest that pain receptors in the affected part of the body become responsive to catecholamines, a group of nervous system messengers. In cases of injury-related CRPS, the syndrome may be caused by a triggering of the immune response, which may lead to the inflammatory symptoms of redness, warmth, and swelling in the affected area. For this reason, it is believed that CRPS may represent a disruption of the healing process.
What Are the Symptoms of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?
The symptoms of CRPS vary in their severity and length. One symptom of CRPS is continuous, intense pain that gets worse rather than better over time. If CRPS occurs after an injury, it may seem out of proportion to the severity of the injury. Even in cases involving an injury only to a finger or toe, pain can spread to include the entire arm or leg. In some cases, pain can even travel to the opposite extremity. Other symptoms of CRPS include:
“Burning” pain
Swelling and stiffness in affected joints
Motor disability, with decreased ability to move the affected body part
Changes in nail and hair growth pattern; there may be rapid hair growth or no hair growth.
Skin changes; CRPS can involve changes in skin temperature — skin on one extremity can feel warmer or cooler compared to the opposite extremity. Skin color may become blotchy, pale, purple or red. The texture of skin also can change, becoming shiny and thin. People with CRPS may have skin that sometimes is excessively sweaty.
CRPS may be heightened by emotional stress.
How Is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Diagnosed?
There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS, but some testing can rule out other conditions. Triple-phase bone scans can be used to identify changes in the bone and in blood circulation. Some health care providers may apply a stimulus (for example, heat, touch, cold) to determine whether there is pain in a specific area.
Making a firm diagnosis of CRPS may be difficult early in the course of the disorder when symptoms are few or mild. CRPS is diagnosed primarily through observation of the following symptoms:
The presence of an initial injury
A higher-than-expected amount of pain from an injury
A change in appearance of an affected area
No other cause of pain or altered appearance

How Is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Treated?
Because there is no cure for CRPS, the goal of treatment is to relieve painful symptoms associated with the disorder. Therapies used include psychotherapy, physical therapy, and drug treatment, such as topical analgesics, narcotics, corticosteroids, osteoporosis medication, antidepressants, osteoporosis medicines, and antiseizure drugs.
Other treatments include:
Sympathetic nerve blocks: These blocks, which are done in a variety of ways, can provide significant pain relief for some people. One kind of block involves placing an anesthetic next to the spine to directly block the sympathetic nerves.
Surgical sympathectomy: This controversial technique destroys the nerves involved in CRPS. Some experts believe it has a favorable outcome, while others feel it makes CRPS worse. The technique should be considered only for people whose pain is dramatically but temporarily relieved by selective sympathetic blocks.
Intrathecal drug pumps: Pumps and implanted catheters are used to send pain-relieving medication into the spinal fluid.
Spinal cord stimulation: This technique, in which electrodes are placed next to the spinal cord, offers relief for many people with the condition.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 27, 2019
Sources
SOURCES:
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: ”Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Fact Sheet.”
UpToDate.
© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Article Provided By: webmd
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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Paresthesia

What Is Paresthesia?

If you’ve ever felt as though your skin was crawling, or had numbness or itching for no apparent reason, you may have experienced paresthesia.
Almost everyone has experienced paresthesia on occasion. One of the most common times people get that familiar feeling of pins and needles is when their arms or legs “fall asleep.” This sensation usually occurs because you’ve inadvertently put pressure on a nerve. It resolves once you change your position to remove the pressure from the affected nerve. This type of paresthesia is temporary and usually resolves without treatment. If the paresthesia persists, you may have an underlying medical disorder that requires treatment.
What are the symptoms of paresthesia?
Paresthesia can affect any part of the body, but it commonly affects the:
hands
arms
legs
feet
It can be temporary or chronic. The symptoms can include feelings of:
numbness
weakness
tingling
burning
cold
Chronic paresthesia may cause a stabbing pain. That may lead to clumsiness of the affected limb. When paresthesia occurs in your legs and feet, it can make it difficult to walk.
See your doctor if you have symptoms of paresthesia that persist or affect with your quality of life. It could be a sign that you have an underlying medical condition that needs treatment.

What causes paresthesia?
It’s not always possible to determine the cause of paresthesia. Temporary paresthesia is often due to pressure on a nerve or brief periods of poor circulation. This can happen when you fall asleep on your hand or sit with your legs crossed for too long. Chronic paresthesia may be a sign of nerve damage. Two types of nerve damage are radiculopathy and neuropathy.
Radiculopathy
Radiculopathy is a condition in which nerve roots become compressed, irritated, or inflamed. This can occur when you have:
a herniated disk that presses on a nerve
a narrowing of the canal that transmits the nerve from your spinal cord to your extremity
any mass that compresses the nerve as it exits the spinal column
Radiculopathy that affects your lower back is called lumbar radiculopathy. Lumbar radiculopathy can cause paresthesia in your leg or foot. In more severe cases, compression of the sciatic nerve can occur and may lead to weakness in your legs. The sciatic nerve is a large nerve that starts in your lower spinal cord.
Cervical radiculopathy involves the nerves that provide sensation and strength to your arms. If you have cervical radiculopathy, you may experience:
chronic neck pain
paresthesia of the upper extremities
arm weakness
hand weakness
Neuropathy
Neuropathy occurs due to chronic nerve damage. The most common cause of neuropathy is hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar.
Other possible causes of neuropathy include:
trauma
repetitive movement injuries
autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis
neurological diseases, such as MS
kidney diseases
liver diseases
stroke
tumors in the brain or near nerves
bone marrow or connective tissue disorders
hypothyroidism
deficiencies in vitamin B-1, B-6, B-12, E, or niacin
getting too much vitamin D
infections, such as Lyme disease, shingles, or HIV
certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs
exposure to toxic substances, such as chemicals or heavy metals
Nerve damage can eventually lead to permanent numbness or paralysis.

Who is at risk for paresthesia?
Anyone can experience temporary paresthesia. Your risk of radiculopathy increases with age. You also may be more prone to it if you:
perform repetitive movements that repeatedly compress your nerves, such as typing, playing an instrument, or playing a sport such as tennis
drink heavily and eat a poor diet that leads to vitamin deficiencies, specifically vitamin B-12 and folate
have type 1 or 2 diabetes
have an autoimmune condition
have a neurological condition, such as MS

How is paresthesia diagnosed?
See your doctor if you have persistent paresthesia with no obvious cause.
Be prepared to give your medical history. Mention any activities you participate in that involve repetitive movement. You should also list any over-the-counter or prescription medications that you take.
Your doctor will consider your known health conditions to help them make a diagnosis. If you have diabetes, for example, your doctor will want to determine if you have nerve damage, or neuropathy.
Your doctor will probably perform a full physical exam. This will likely include a neurological exam as well. Blood work and other laboratory tests, such as a spinal tap, may help them rule out certain diseases.
If your doctor suspects there’s a problem with your neck or spine, they may recommend imaging tests, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans.
Depending on the results, they may refer you to a specialist, such as a neurologist, orthopedist, or endocrinologist.

What is the treatment for paresthesia?
Treatment depends on the cause of your paresthesia. It may be possible to treat your condition by eliminating the cause in some cases. For example, if you have a repetitive movement injury, a few lifestyle adjustments or physical therapy may solve the problem.
If your paresthesia is due to an underlying disease, getting treatment for that disease can potentially ease the symptoms of paresthesia.
Your individual circumstances will determine whether your symptoms will improve. Some types of nerve damage are irreversible.

What is the outlook for people with paresthesia?
Temporary paresthesia usually resolves within a few minutes.
You may have a case of chronic paresthesia if those strange sensations don’t go away or they come back far too often. It can complicate your daily life if the symptoms are severe. That’s why it’s so important to try to find the cause. Don’t hesitate to seek a second opinion or see a specialist if necessary.
The severity of chronic paresthesia and how long it will last largely depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying condition solves the problem.
Be sure to tell your doctor if your treatment isn’t working so they can adjust your treatment plan.
How can you prevent paresthesia?
Paresthesia isn’t always preventable. For instance, you probably can’t help it if you tend to fall asleep on your arms. You can take steps to reduce the occurrence or severity of paresthesia, though. For example, using wrist splints at night may alleviate the compression of the nerves of your hand and help resolve the symptoms of paresthesia you experience at night.
Follow these tips for preventing chronic paresthesia:
Avoid repetitive movement if possible.
Rest often if you need to perform repetitive movements.
Get up and move around as often as possible if you have to sit for long periods.
If you have diabetes or any other chronic disease, careful monitoring and disease management will help lower your chances of having paresthesia.

Article Provided By: healthline
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal Neuralgia
Trigeminal neuralgia is a condition characterized by pain coming from the trigeminal nerve, which affects the face — most commonly one side of the jaw or cheek.
The pain of trigeminal neuralgia is unlike facial pain caused by other problems. It is often described as stabbing, lancinating or electrical in sensation and so severe that the affected person cannot eat or drink.
Trigeminal neuralgia is sometimes known as tic douloureux, which means “painful tic.”

What You Need to Know
Trigeminal neuralgia most frequently affects people older than 50, and the condition is more common in women than men.
Trigeminal neuralgia is the most common cause of facial pain and is diagnosed in approximately 15,000 people per year in the United States.
Trigeminal neuralgia pain is exceptionally severe. Although the condition is not life-threatening, the intensity of the pain can be debilitating.
Trigeminal neuralgia relief is possible: Medical and surgical treatments can bring the pain under control, especially when managed by an expert physician and surgeon.
Causes of Trigeminal Neuralgia
Trigeminal neuralgia may be caused by a blood vessel pressing against the trigeminal nerve. Over time, the pulse of an artery rubbing against the nerve can wear away the insulation, which is called myelin, leaving the nerve exposed and highly sensitive.
These symptoms can be similar to those caused by dental problems, and sometimes people with undiagnosed trigeminal neuralgia explore multiple dental procedures in an effort to control the pain.
Multiple sclerosis or rarely a tumor can cause trigeminal neuralgia. Researchers are exploring whether or not postherpetic neuralgia (caused by shingles) can be related to this condition.

Trigeminal Neuralgia Symptoms
Episodes of sharp, stabbing pain in the cheek or jaw that may feel like an electric shock
Pain episodes that may be triggered by anything touching the face or teeth, including shaving, applying makeup, brushing teeth, eating, drinking or talking — or even a light breeze
Periods of relief between episodes
Anxiety from the thought of the pain returning
A flare-up of trigeminal neuralgia may begin with tingling or numbness in the face. Pain occurs in intermittent bursts that last anywhere from a few seconds to two minutes, becoming more and more frequent until the pain is almost continuous.
Flare-ups may continue for a few weeks or months followed by a pain-free period that can last a year or more.
Trigeminal Neuralgia Diagnosis
Diagnosing trigeminal neuralgia involves a physical exam and a detailed medical history to rule out other causes of facial pain. The health care provider will ask what the pain is like, what seems to set it off and what makes it feel better or worse.
The provider may recommend imaging or laboratory tests to determine if the pain is caused by a tumor or blood vessel abnormality or by undiagnosed multiple sclerosis. Certain advanced MRI techniques may help the doctor see where a blood vessel is pressing against a branch of the trigeminal nerve.
Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia
Most common over-the-counter and prescription pain medicines don’t work for people with trigeminal neuralgia, but many modern treatments can reduce or eliminate the pain. The doctor may recommend one or more of these approaches:
Medications: Seizure drugs like carbamazepine, gabapentin or other agents can be helpful. It is important to work closely with a neurologist or primary care provider to monitor dosages and side effects.
Surgery: Several procedures can often help bring trigeminal neuralgia pain under control.
Rhizotomy
There are several kinds of rhizotomies, which are all outpatient procedures performed under general anesthesia in the operating room. The surgeon inserts a long needle through the cheek on the affected side and uses an electrical current or a chemical to deaden the pain fibers of the trigeminal nerve.
Stereotactic Radiosurgery
Stereotactic radiosurgery, sometimes known as CyberKnife treatment, is another outpatient procedure that involves a very concentrated and precise beam of radiation that is directed at the trigeminal nerve to relieve the pain.
Microvascular Decompression (MVD) Surgery
This procedure is currently regarded as the most long-lasting treatment for trigeminal neuralgia and may be suitable for people in good health who can tolerate surgery and general anesthesia and whose lifestyles can accommodate a recovery period of four to six weeks.
The surgeon makes an incision behind the ear and removes a small piece of the skull to gain access to the nerve and blood vessels. Then, the surgeon places a cushion of insulation around the blood vessel so it no longer compresses or rubs against the nerve.
In about one third of people treated with MVD surgeries, trigeminal neuralgia pain returns, possibly due to the blood vessels growing back. The doctor will help individuals with recurring pain choose other options or may recommend repeating procedures.
Managing Trigeminal Neuralgia
Although not fatal, trigeminal neuralgia pain and the anxiety it causes can erode a person’s quality of life. It is essential to work closely with experienced and compassionate health care providers who can help find the best therapeutic approach for each individual.
The surgery for trigeminal neuralgia is delicate and precise since the involved area is very small. Look for experienced neurosurgeons who see and treat a large number of people with trigeminal neuralgia.

 

Article Provided By: hopkinsmedicine
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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Why Is Neuropathy Worse at Night?

January 3, 2020 / Brain & Spine
Why Is Neuropathy Worse at Night?
Reasons why nerve pain is more painful at night
Peripheral neuropathy is when a nerve or group of nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord is injured or dysfunctions. It could be because of an injury to a single nerve, like carpal tunnel syndrome, or because a group of nerves have become defective, like with peripheral neuropathy of the feet.
“Across the board we know that neuropathy can cause pain depending on what type of nerves are involved,” says neurologist Benjamin Claytor, MD. “When people describe worsening symptoms at night they’re describing discomfort – pins and needles, tingling and burning pain.”
Here Dr. Claytor discusses what might be causing this nightly pain and how to find relief.
Distraction
Our attention level can influence how we perceive pain. So during the day when we’re at work or taking care of the kids – we’re distracted and busy. Although there hasn’t been much research around it, the idea is that we aren’t focusing on the pain during the day because we’re busy, we pay less attention to it and perceive less pain.
“Many patients will tell me that after they get home from work, have dinner and sit down to watch TV for the night that their pain flares up,” says Dr. Claytor. “This could be because the daytime distractions are now gone and you’re starting to unwind for the night.”
Temperature and sleep
Another thought behind nightly neuropathy has to do with temperature. At night our body temperature fluctuates and goes down a bit. Most people tend to sleep in a cooler room as well. The thought is that damaged nerves might interpret the temperature change as pain or tingling, which can heighten the sense of neuropathy.
Also consider poor sleep quality. If you’re not sleeping very well to begin with, either due to poor sleep habits or sleep related disorders, this could lead to increased pain perception.
Emotions and stress
Our emotional state can also influence how we perceive pain. Stress and anxiety can feed in to and amplify pain signaling. Living in a chronic state of stress wreaks havoc on your physical and mental health.
Medication
Sometimes medication dosing and timing might need to be adjusted, which could be particularly true for some short acting medications used for neuropathy pain.
How to stop neuropathy pain at night
“There are options we can explore if your neuropathy pain seems to be worsening at night,” explains Dr. Claytor. “There might be oral or topical medications we can prescribe, or maybe it’s getting your stress under control and being more mindful.”
Cognitive behavioral therapy, physical therapy and meditation may be complementary tools to reduce pain as well.
Dr. Claytor stresses the importance of talking to your doctor sooner rather than later. Often time’s people will wait so long to see their physician that there’s permanent nerve damage that might have been avoided.
“I think one of the most important things I can discuss with a patient who comes in with neuropathy pain at night is getting to the root cause of what is actually driving it,” says Dr. Claytor. “Depending on what the underlying cause is, treating that first and foremost can usually help reduce the pain overall – especially at night.”

 

Article Provided By: health.clevelandclinic
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

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