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Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis.
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
The most common type of peripheral neuropathy is diabetic neuropathy, caused by a high sugar level and resulting in nerve fiber damage in your legs and feet.
Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects, such as burning pain or paralysis.

Peripheral neuropathy is a type of damage to the nervous system. Specifically, it is a problem with your peripheral nervous system. This is the network of nerves that sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body.
Peripheral Neuropathy Causes
Peripheral neuropathy has many different causes. Some people inherit the disorder from their parents. Others develop it because of an injury or another disorder.
In many cases, a different type of problem, such as a kidney condition or a hormone imbalance, leads to peripheral neuropathy. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy in the U.S. is diabetes.
Peripheral Neuropathy Types
There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own set of symptoms and prognosis. To help doctors classify them, they are often broken down into the following categories:
Motor neuropathy. This is damage to the nerves that control muscles and movement in the body, such as moving your hands and arms or talking.
Sensory neuropathy. Sensory nerves control what you feel, such as pain, temperature or a light touch. Sensory neuropathy affects these groups of nerves.
Autonomic nerve neuropathy. Autonomic nerves control functions that you are not conscious of, such as breathing and heartbeat. Damage to these nerves can be serious.
Combination neuropathies. You may have a mix of 2 or 3 of these other types of neuropathies, such as a sensory-motor neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy vary based on the type that you have and what part of the body is affected. Symptoms can range from tingling or numbness in a certain body part to more serious effects such as burning pain or paralysis.
Muscle weakness
Cramps
Muscle twitching
Loss of muscle and bone
Changes in skin, hair, or nails
Numbness
Loss of sensation or feeling in body parts
Loss of balance or other functions as a side effect of the loss of feeling in the legs, arms, or other body parts
Emotional disturbances
Sleep disruptions
Loss of pain or sensation that can put you at risk, such as not feeling an impending heart attack or limb pain
Inability to sweat properly, leading to heat intolerance
Loss of bladder control, leading to infection or incontinence
Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting because of a loss of control over blood pressure
Diarrhea, constipation, or incontinence related to nerve damage in the intestines or digestive tract
Trouble eating or swallowing
Life-threatening symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or irregular heartbeat
The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy may look like other conditions or medical problems. Always see your healthcare provider for a diagnosis.
Peripheral Neuropathy Diagnosis
The symptoms and body parts affected by peripheral neuropathy are so varied that it may be hard to make a diagnosis. If your healthcare provider suspects nerve damage, he or she will take an extensive medical history and do a number of neurological tests to determine the location and extent of your nerve damage. These may include:
Blood tests
Spinal fluid tests
Muscle strength tests
Tests of the ability to detect vibrations
Depending on what basic tests reveal, your healthcare provider may want to do more in-depth scanning and other tests to get a better look at your nerve damage. Tests may include:
CT scan
MRI scan
Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies
Nerve and skin biopsy
Peripheral Neuropathy Treatment
Usually a peripheral neuropathy can’t be cured, but you can do a lot of things to prevent it from getting worse. If an underlying condition like diabetes is at fault, your healthcare provider will treat that first and then treat the pain and other symptoms of neuropathy.
In some cases, over-the-counter pain relievers can help. Other times, prescription medicines are needed. Some of these medicines include mexiletine, a medicine developed to correct irregular heart rhythms; antiseizure drugs, such as gabapentin, phenytoin, and carbamazepine; and some classes of antidepressants, including tricyclics such as amitriptyline.
Lidocaine injections and patches may help with pain in other instances. And in extreme cases, surgery can be used to destroy nerves or repair injuries that are causing neuropathic pain and symptoms.
Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention
Lifestyle choices can play a role in preventing peripheral neuropathy. You can lessen your risk for many of these conditions by avoiding alcohol, correcting vitamin deficiencies, eating a healthy diet, losing weight, avoiding toxins, and exercising regularly. If you have kidney disease, diabetes, or other chronic health condition, it is important to work with your healthcare provider to control your condition, which may prevent or delay the onset of peripheral neuropathy.
Peripheral Neuropathy Management
Even if you already have some form of peripheral neuropathy, healthy lifestyle steps can help you feel your best and reduce the pain and symptoms related to the disorder. You’ll also want to quit smoking, not let injuries go untreated, and be meticulous about caring for your feet and treating wounds to avoid complications, such as the loss of a limb.
In some cases, non-prescription hand and foot braces can help you make up for muscle weakness. Orthotics can help you walk better. Relaxation techniques, such as yoga, may help ease emotional as well as physical symptoms.

 

Article Provided By: hopkinsmedicine

 

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Femoral Neuropathy

Femoral Neuropathy

What is femoral neuropathy?

Femoral neuropathy, or femoral nerve dysfunction, occurs when you can’t move or feel part of your leg because of damaged nerves, specifically the femoral nerve. This can result from an injury, prolonged pressure on the nerve, or damage from disease. In most cases, this condition will go away without treatment. However, medications and physical therapy may be necessary if symptoms don’t improve.

What causes femoral neuropathy?

The femoral nerve is one of the largest nerves in your leg. It’s located near the groin and controls the muscles that help straighten your leg and move your hips. It also provides feeling in the lower part of your leg and the front of your thigh. Because of where it’s located, damage to the femoral nerve is uncommon relative to neuropathies caused by damage to other nerves. When the femoral nerve is damaged, it affects your ability to walk and may cause problems with sensation in your leg and foot. View the femoral nerve on this BodyMap of the femur.

Damage to the femoral nerve can be the result of:

  • a direct injury
  • a tumor or other growth blocking or trapping part of your nerve
  • prolonged pressure on the nerve, such as from prolonged immobilization
  • a pelvic fracture
  • radiation to the pelvis
  • hemorrhage or bleeding into the space behind the abdomen, which is called the retroperitoneal space
  • a catheter placed into the femoral artery, which is necessary for certain surgical procedures

Diabetes may cause femoral neuropathy. Diabetes can cause widespread nerve damage due to fluctuations in blood sugar and blood pressure. Nerve damage that affects your legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms is known as peripheral neuropathy. There is currently some debate about whether femoral neuropathy is truly a peripheral neuropathy or a form of diabetic amyotrophy.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), diabetes is the most common reason for peripheral neuropathy in people who’ve had diabetes for at least 25 years.

Signs of femoral neuropathy

This nerve condition can lead to difficulties moving around. Your leg or knee might feel weak, and you may be unable to put pressure on the affected leg.

You might also feel unusual sensations in your legs. They include:

  • numbness in any part of the leg (typically the front and inside of the thigh, but potentially all the way down to the feet)
  • tingling in any part of the leg
  • dull aching pain in the genital region
  • lower extremity muscle weakness
  • difficulty extending the knee due to quadriceps weakness
  • feeling like your leg or knee is going to give out (buckle) on you
How serious is it?

Prolonged pressure placed on the femoral nerve can prevent blood from flowing in the affected area. The decreased blood flow can result in tissue damage.

If your nerve damage is the result of an injury, it may be possible that your femoral vein or artery is also damaged. This could cause dangerous internal bleeding. The femoral artery is a very large artery that lies close to the femoral nerve. Trauma often damages both at the same time. Injury to the artery or bleeding from the artery can cause compression on the nerve.

Additionally, the femoral nerve provides sensation to a major portion of the leg. This loss of sensation can lead to injuries. Having weak leg muscles can make you more prone to falling. Falls are of particular concern in older adults because they can cause hip fractures, which are very serious injuries.

 

Diagnosing femoral neuropathy

Initial tests

To diagnose femoral neuropathy and its cause, your doctor will perform a comprehensive physical exam and ask questions about recent injuries or surgeries, as well as questions about your medical history.

To look for weakness, they will test specific muscles that receive sensation from the femoral nerve. Your doctor will probably check your knee reflexes and ask about changes in feeling in the front part of the thigh and the middle part of the leg. The goal of the evaluation is to determine whether the weakness involves only the femoral nerve or if other nerves also contribute.

Additional testing might include:

Nerve conduction

Nerve conduction checks the speed of electrical impulses in your nerves. An abnormal response, such as a slow time for electrical signals to travel through your nerves, usually indicates damage to the nerve in question.

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) should be performed after the nerve conduction test to see how well your muscles and nerves are working. This test records the electrical activity present in your muscles when the nerves that lead to them are active. The EMG will determine whether the muscle responds appropriately to stimulation. Certain medical conditions cause muscles to fire on their own, which is an abnormality that an EMG can reveal. Because nerves stimulate and control your muscles, the test can identify problems with both muscles and nerves.

MRI and CT scans

An MRI scan can look for tumors, growths, or any other masses in the area of the femoral nerve that could cause compression on the nerve. MRI scans use radio waves and magnets to produce a detailed image of the part of your body that is being scanned.

A CT scan can also look for vascular or bone growths.

Treatment options

The first step in treating femoral neuropathy is dealing with the underlying condition or cause. If compression on the nerve is the cause, the goal will be to relieve the compression. Occasionally in mild injuries, such as mild compression or a stretch injury, the problem may resolve spontaneously. For people with diabetes, bringing blood sugar levels back to normal may alleviate nerve dysfunction. If your nerve doesn’t improve on its own, you’ll need treatment. This usually involves medications and physical therapy.

Medications

You might have corticosteroid injections in your leg to reduce inflammation and get rid of any swelling that occurs. Pain medications can help relieve any pain and discomfort. For neuropathic pain, your doctor may prescribe medications, such as gabapentin, pregabalin, or amitriptyline.

Therapy

Physical therapy can help build up the strength in your leg muscles again. A physical therapist will teach you exercises to strengthen and stretch your muscles. Undergoing physical therapy helps to reduce pain and promote mobility.

You might need to use an orthopedic device, such as a brace, to assist you with walking. Usually, a knee brace is helpful in preventing knee buckling.

Depending on how severe the nerve damage is and how much trouble you’re having moving around, you might also need occupational therapy. This type of therapy helps you learn to do regular tasks like bathing and other self-care activities. These are called “activities of daily living.” Your doctor might also recommend vocational counseling if your condition forces you to find another line of work.

Surgery

Your doctor might recommend surgery if you have a growth blocking your femoral nerve. Removing the growth will relieve the pressure on your nerve.

Long-term outlook after treatment

You might be able to heal fully after you treat the underlying condition. If the treatment isn’t successful or if the femoral nerve damage is severe, you might permanently lose feeling in that part of your leg or the ability to move it.

Tips to prevent nerve damage

You can lower your risk of femoral neuropathy caused by diabetes by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. This helps protect your nerves from damage caused by this disease. Preventive measures would be directed at each cause. Talk to your doctor for advice about what preventive measures would be the best for you.

Maintaining an active lifestyle helps to keep your leg muscles strong and improve stability.

Last medically reviewed on September 13, 2017

 

Article Provided ByHealthline

 

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Nerve Pain Therapy, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Calmare Scrambler, Chronic Pain Therapy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint is thought to cause low back pain and/or leg pain. The leg pain can be particularly difficult and may feel similar to sciatica or pain caused by a lumbar disc herniation. The sacroiliac joint lies next to the bottom of the spine, below the lumbar spine and above the tailbone (coccyx). It connects the sacrum (the triangular bone at the bottom of the spine) with the pelvis (iliac crest).

The joint typically has the following characteristics:

  • Small and very strong, reinforced by strong ligaments that surround it
  • Does not have much motion
  • Transmits all the forces of the upper body to the pelvis (hips) and legs
  • Acts as a shock-absorbing structure

Symptoms

The most common symptoms for patients are lower back pain and the following sensations in the lower extremity: pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, pelvis/buttock pain, hip/groin pain, feeling of leg instability (buckling, giving way), disturbed sleep patterns, disturbed sitting patterns (unable to sit for long periods, sitting on one side), pain going from sitting to standing.


Causes and Risk Factors

While it is not clear how the pain is caused, it is thought that an alteration in the normal joint motion may be the culprit that causes sacroiliac pain. This source of pain can be caused by either:

Too much movement (hypermobility or instability): The pain is typically felt in the lower back and/or hip and may radiate into the groin area.

Too little movement (hypomobility or fixation): The pain is typically felt on one side of the lower back or buttocks and can radiate down the leg. The pain usually remains above the knee, but at times pain can extend to the ankle or foot. The pain is similar to sciatica — or pain that radiates down the sciatic nerve — and is caused by a radiculopathy.

Diagnosis

Accurately diagnosing sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be difficult because the symptoms mimic other common conditions, including other mechanical back pain conditions like facet syndrome and lumbar spine conditions including disc herniation and radiculopathy (pain along the sciatic nerve that radiates down the leg). A diagnosis is usually arrived at through physical examination (eliminating other causes) and/or an injection (utilized to block the pain).

Treatments

Treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction are usually conservative (meaning nonsurgical) and focus on trying to restore normal motion in the joint:

  • Ice, heat and rest.
  • Medications: acetaminophen, as well as anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen or naproxen) to reduce the swelling that is usually contributing to the patient’s pain.
  • Manual manipulation provided by a chiropractor, osteopathic doctor or other qualified health practitioner may help. This can be highly effective when the sacroiliac joint is fixated or “stuck.” It may be irritating if the sacroiliac joint is hypermobile. The manipulation is accomplished through a number of methods, including (but not limited to): side-posture manipulation, drop technique, blocking techniques and instrument-guided methods.
  • Supports or braces for when the sacroiliac joint is “hypermobile,” or too loose.
  • Controlled, gradual physical therapy may be helpful to strengthen the muscles around the sacroiliac joint and appropriately increase range of motion. In addition, any type of gentle, low-impact aerobic exercise will help increase the flow of blood to the area, which in turn stimulates a healing response. For severe pain, water therapy may be an option, as the water provides buoyancy for the body and reduces stress on the painful joint.
  • Sacroiliac joint injections.

When these treatments fail, surgery may be offered. In surgery, one or both of the sacroiliac joints may be fused with the goal of eliminating any abnormal motion.

Article Provided By: Cedars-Sinai

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Carpal Tunnel Pain

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome, also called median nerve compression, is a condition that causes numbness, tingling, or weakness in your hand.It happens because of pressure on your median nerve, which runs the length of your arm, goes through a passage in your wrist called the carpal tunnel, and ends in your hand. The median controls the movement and feeling of your thumb and the movement of all your fingers except your pinky. 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms

Symptoms of carpal tunnel include:

  • Burning, tingling, or itching numbness in your palm and thumb or your index and middle fingers
  • Weakness in your hand and trouble holding things
  • Shock-like feelings that move into your fingers
  • Tingling that moves up into your arm

You might first notice that your fingers “fall asleep” and become numb at night. It usually happens because of how you hold your hand while you sleep.

In the morning, you may wake up with numbness and tingling in your hands that may run all the way to your shoulder. During the day, your symptoms might flare up while you’re holding something with your wrist bent, like when you’re driving or reading a book.

As carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse, you may have less grip strength because the muscles in your hand shrink. You’ll also have more pain and muscle cramping.

Your median nerve can’t work the way it should because of the irritation or pressure around it. This leads to:

  • Slower nerve impulses
  • Less feeling in your fingers
  • Less strength and coordination, especially the ability to use your thumb to pinch

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Causes

Often, people don’t know what brought on their carpal tunnel syndrome. It can be due to:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Risk Factors

You might have a higher risk of getting carpal tunnel syndrome if you:

  • Are a woman. Women are three times more likely than men to get it. This might be because they tend to have smaller carpal tunnels.
  • Have a family member with small carpal tunnels
  • Have a job in which you make the same motions with your arm, hand, or wrist over and over, such as an assembly line worker, sewer or knitter, baker, cashier, hairstylist, or musician
  • Fracture or dislocate your wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Diagnosis and Tests

Your doctor may tap the palm side of your wrist, a test called Tinel sign, or fully flex your wrist with your arms extended. They might also do tests including:

  • Imaging tests. X-rays, ultrasounds, or MRI exams can let your doctor look at your bones and tissues.
  • Electromyogram. Your doctor puts a thin electrode into a muscle to measure its electrical activity.
  • Nerve conduction studies. Your doctor tapes electrodes to your skin to measure the signals in the nerves of your hand and arm.

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Treatment

Your treatment will depend on your symptoms and how far your condition has progressed. You might need:

  • Lifestyle changes. If repetitive motion is causing your symptoms, take breaks more often or do a bit less of the activity that’s causing you pain.
  • Exercises. Stretching or strengthening moves can make you feel better. Nerve gliding exercises can help the nerve move better within your carpal tunnel.
  • Immobilization. Your doctor may tell you to wear a splint to keep your wrist from moving and to lessen pressure on your nerves. You may wear one at night to help get rid of that numbness or tingling feeling. This can help you sleep better and rest your median nerve.
  • Medication. Your doctor may give you anti-inflammatory drugs or steroid shots to curb swelling.
  • Surgery. If none of those treatments works, you might have an operation called carpal tunnel release that increases the size of the tunnel and eases the pressure on your nerve.

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Complications

If you have carpal tunnel syndrome and don’t treat it, the symptoms can last a long time and get worse. They could also go away and then come back. When you get a diagnosis early, the condition is easier to treat. You can avoid permanent muscle damage and keep your hand working the way it should.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Prevention

To avoid carpal tunnel syndrome, try to:

  • Keep your wrists straight.
  • Use a splint or brace that helps keep your wrist in a neutral position.
  • Avoid flexing and extending your wrists over and over again.
  • Keep your hands warm.
  • Take breaks whenever you can.
  • Put your hands and wrists in the right position while you work.

 

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on November 25, 2019

Sources

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

National Institutes of Health.

Mayo Clinic Proceedings: “The Many Faces of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Mayo Clinic: “Carpel tunnel syndrome.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Article Provided By: Webmd

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CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Causes of CRPS

What is complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)?

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS), is a type of chronic pain condition. It typically occurs after an injury or medical condition and affects one limb (arm, leg, hand or foot).

What are the causes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)?

Though complex regional pain syndrome is not yet completely understood, it is believed that CRPS develops when the central or peripheral nervous system is damaged or malfunctions. When the nerves are damaged, they are not able to properly control blood flow, sensation and temperature in the affected area; this leads to the symptoms of CRPS, including pain and skin changes.

CRPS can be triggered by an injury or a medical condition. Triggers for CRPS include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Sprain or strain
  • Soft tissue or nerve injury
  • Surgical injury
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Infection
  • Immobilization of a limb (such as using a splint or cast)

In addition to nerve damage, CRPS may also be caused by pain receptors in the injured part of the body becoming receptive to different nervous system messages. It may be caused by dysfunction between the central and peripheral nervous system.

The immune system may also play a role in the development of CRPS. After an injury, an immune response is triggered. This leads to inflammatory symptoms, such as redness and swelling in the affected area. In the case of CRPS, this immune system response may malfunction and continue after the original injury has healed.

It is likely that a combination of these different factors leads to the development of complex regional pain syndrome .

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Neuropathic Pain, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

What is Neuropathic Pain?

If you are involved in an accident and an injury occurs, under normal circumstance, your nerves will send messages to the brain, signaling pain at the site of trauma. Neuropathic pain is coming directly from the nerves without the occurrence of trauma or accident. In other words, there is no reason the nerves should be sending pain signals.

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

A damaged nerve may lead to dysfunction. Nerves can be damaged in a previous injury or surgery. As a result, the damaged nerve may send false signals of pain to the brain, despite there being no real cause of pain. In the case of a previous injury, the site of trauma may have completely healed but the central nervous system is still registering the site as a location of trauma.

Neuropathy Symptoms

There are several key symptoms associated with Neuropathy:

  • Normal movements become painful
  • Mobility is limited
  • May lead to a sedentary lifestyle
  • Pain will range from mild to severe
  • Pain may be experienced differently – For example: sharp, shock-like, shooting, etc
  • Numbness
  • Feeling of coldness
  • Tingling
  • Persistent numbness, tingling, or weakness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Insomnia

Neuropathic Pain Relief Treatments

First, your doctor will attempt to find the cause of the Neuropathy. Tests such as an MRI and Electromyography are conducted. If a cause is discovered, such as a herniated disc as the central cause of the pain, the appropriate measures are taken.

If no obvious cause is discovered, your doctor will focus on prescribing an effective pain relief method. The pain relief will depend on the individual and the severity of the neuropathy. Treatment options typically include medications, an active method of recovery such as physical therapy, and spinal cord stimulation for more complex cases.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Chronic Pain and the Immune System

Chronic pain can impact physical and mental health in various ways. One of the physical consequences of chronic pain is the effect it can have on the function of the immune system, making the body more susceptible to illnesses. This can occur due to changes in T-cells, stress, or immunosuppressant therapy.

Changes in T-cells

The article, “Chronic Pain Changes Our Immune System,” published on painnewsnetwork.org (an online non-profit news source focused on chronic pain and pain management) on January 16, 2020, cites a study in which researchers at McGill University in Montreal found that chronic pain may affect DNA methylation (a process that changes the activity of a DNA segment). The study, conducted on rats, found that the genes in certain immune system cells that fight infections, called T cells, appear to be altered by chronic pain. Therefore, the body may not be able to fight illness or infection as well as it otherwise would.

Stress

Pain causes a stress response in the body, which leads to a rise in the stress hormone cortisol. Higher levels of cortisol reduce the immune system response. Stress can also decrease lymphocytes, which is a type of white blood cell that helps fight off infection.

Immunosuppressant therapy

Chronic pain can be associated with autoimmune conditions, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. Autoimmune conditions, along with various other health conditions, may be treated with immunosuppressants. These medications, including corticosteroids and biologics, are often necessary to treat autoimmune and other health conditions, but a major side effect is lowered immunity to infections and infections that are more difficult to treat.

Helpful tips

Tips to help prevent illness despite having a weakened immune system include the following:

  • Support the immune system by getting plenty of sleep, eating a well-balanced diet, and staying as active as possible.
  • Engage in proper hand hygiene (frequently wash the hands with soap for at least 20 seconds).
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces in the home, office, and car.
  • Stay away from others who are sick or may be sick. Stay home as much as possible. Practice social distancing.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Peripheral Neuropathy, Diabetic Neuropathy, Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Home Remedies for Diabetic Neuropathy

There are many complications due to diabetic neuropathy. Here is a list of lifestyle and home remedies to help manage diabetic neuropathy.

Watch your blood pressure

Hypertension, high blood pressure, is commonly seen in people with diabetes which increases the complications of diabetic neuropathy. The damaged blood vessels reduce blood flow. Always check your blood pressure to avoid any future complications.

Eating Healthy

The best way to control your blood sugar levels is watching what you eat. Focus on eating a well-balanced healthy diet full of fresh, unprocessed, whole foods. Reduce simple carbohydrates, and any added sugar or additive. Limiting your saturated and trans-fat intake and sticking to unsaturated fats. Eating lean proteins, fiber, omega-3 fatty acids help lower or maintain complications. Triglycerides are high risk factors for diabetic complications. In place of table sugar, use stevia to avoid spikes in your blood sugar levels. Drink lots of filtered water and avoid soda, juices, and other sweetened drinks. Always read the nutrition label to know what is entering your body.

Staying active

Daily exercise and activity is the best way to control your diabetic symptoms, blood sugar, high blood pressure, healthy weight, and flexibility. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 30 minutes of moderate-intense exercise should be performed at least 5 times a week. If severe neuropathy is present, you might be recommended to non-weight-bearing activities such as bicycling or swimming.

Quit Smoking

If you have diabetic neuropathy, you are more prone to develop kidney problems. Therefore, reducing additional stress on the kidney from the toxins in smoking can help. Smoking is a risk factor for diabetic neuropathy and developing circulations issues in your feet. You have a higher chance than a nonsmoker to die of a heart attack or stroke.

Contact your healthcare provider if you need further assistance in controlling your diabetic neuropathy.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Ignore

7 Types of Pain You Should Never Ignore

Though it may be tricky to know if your pain is normal or if it is serious, certain types of pain should not be ignored.

Pain, pressure or a feeling of compression in your chest is a typical indication of a heart attack.  Heart attack pain expands to other parts of the body including the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, and back.  Women may ignore symptoms like sweating but women have more atypical symptoms that could be due to something else.

A severe headache worries many people who think they may have a brain tumor.  A lot of the brain lacks nerve endings, so most headaches will have other causes.  Though it is uncommon, a severe pain in the brain may indicate stroke or blood clot.  Be watchful for other symptoms including stiff neck, fever, confusion, weakness, or numbness as well as throwing up and fainting.

Lower back pain may be caused by regular wear and tear but in serious cases, it may be caused by infection, tumor, ruptured disc, and kidney stones.  Pain in the lower back may also be caused by heart disease, and it may also precede an aortic dissection which is a  serious problem in which the blood vessel to the middle and lower parts of your body bursts.

Pain in the abdominal region may be caused by a burst appendix.  In this case, you would need to go to the emergency room immediately.  Pain in the stomach may also be caused by pancreas issues, blocked bowels and ectopic pregnancy.

Calf pain may result when your leg is swollen, red and painful.  This could be caused by blood clot blocking a vein.  Deep vein thrombosis can move from your legs to your lungs and can be deadly.

Hand and foot pain may be caused by diabetes, a condition that can happen any place but is most common in hands, arms, feet, and legs.  The longer you have been afflicted with diabetes, the greater risk of suffering nerve damage.  Pain caused by peripheral neuropathy is often described as “pins and needles” or “shooting.”

Pain that cannot be identified may be caused by depression or anxiety.  Mood disorders may make it difficult to pin down the exact cause of pain.  Pain may be present in the joints, arms and legs, back, and head.

Article Provided By: Pain Scale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5 Coping Skills for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain not only affects the body, it also affects the mind. While medical treatments for chronic pain are essential, they work best when combined with mental and emotional coping skills.

Skill 1: Learning

When diagnosed with a chronic pain condition, learning about the condition can ease the fear of the unknown. Individuals should be well-educated by a physician or other reputable resource(s) about their condition and treatment plan.

Participating in self-management education (SME) programs for chronic health conditions may also be helpful. These programs teach chronic pain management strategies that help to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. More information can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

Skill 2: Accepting

Acceptance of chronic pain does not mean giving up or not investing any effort to reduce pain and increase quality of life. Instead, acceptance of a chronic pain diagnosis means recognizing the reality of the condition, which eases the emotional struggle with the situation. Acceptance of chronic pain allows individuals to focus on management and treatment.

Accepting chronic pain is a challenging skill that may be best addressed with a counselor or therapist. Both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have proven to be effective treatments for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

Skill 3: Relaxing

Relaxing while in pain can be challenging, but it is possible. Persistent pain can increase stress, and stress can increase chronic pain. It can become a vicious cycle.

Various relaxation techniques and practices, such as mindfulness, yoga, tai chi, diaphragmatic breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, can decrease the stress response, which can reduce chronic pain. Relaxation tapes, online tutorials or videos may also be helpful.

Biofeedback can also help with relaxation. During biofeedback training, a professional uses technology to help individuals learn to control bodily functions, such as heart rate and muscle tension. Once these skills are mastered, they can be practiced without the use of technology.

Skill 4: Pacing

Activity pacing is a skill in which individuals learn to pace themselves throughout the day in order to conserve energy and prevent increased pain. This often involves dividing large tasks into smaller ones. It can also include adjusting schedules. For example, if an event or activity is scheduled for the evening, activity pacing throughout the day helps conserve energy both physically and mentally.

Skill 5: Coping

The skill of coping involves using treatment tools, distraction techniques and learned skills when pain becomes severe. Coping treatment methods include taking pain medication, using hot and cold therapy, applying topical creams, getting a massage, etc.

Distraction techniques can also help individuals cope by focusing attention away from negative or painful thoughts. Watching a favorite movie, talking to a friend, or participating in a hobby or pastime are all examples of distractions.

It is important to note that even when these coping skills are mastered, unusual levels or unfamiliar types of pain should be discussed with a physician.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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