fbpx
0

Everything You Should Know About Allodynia

Everything You Should Know About Allodynia

What is allodynia?
Allodynia is an unusual symptom that can result from several nerve-related conditions. When you’re experiencing it, you feel pain from stimuli that don’t normally cause pain. For example, lightly touching your skin or brushing your hair might feel painful.
To ease allodynia, your doctor will try to treat the underlying cause.
What are the symptoms of allodynia?
The main symptom of allodynia is pain from stimuli that don’t usually cause pain. In some cases, you might find hot or cold temperatures painful. You might find gentle pressure on your skin painful. You might feel pain in response to a brushing sensation or other movement along your skin or hair.
Depending on the underlying cause of your allodynia, you might experience other symptoms too.
For example, if it’s caused by fibromyalgia, you might also experience:
anxiety
depression
trouble concentrating
trouble sleeping
fatigue
If it’s linked to migraines, you might also experience:
painful headaches
increased sensitivity to light or sounds
changes in your vision
nausea
What causes allodynia?
Some underlying conditions can cause allodynia. It’s most commonly linked to fibromyalgia and migraine headaches. Postherpetic neuralgia or peripheral neuropathy can also cause it.
Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia is a disorder in which you feel muscle and joint pain throughout your body. But it’s not related to an injury or a condition such as arthritis. Instead, it seems to be linked to the way your brain processes pain signals from your body. It’s still something of a medical mystery. Scientists don’t quite understand its roots, but it tends to run in families. Certain viruses, stress, or trauma might also trigger fibromyalgia.
Migraine headaches
Migraine is a type of headache that causes intense pain. Changes in nerve signals and chemical activity in your brain trigger this type of headache. In some cases, these changes can cause allodynia.
Peripheral neuropathy
Peripheral neuropathy happens when the nerves that connect your body to your spinal cord and brain become damaged or destroyed. It can result from several serious medical conditions. For example, it’s a potential complication of diabetes.
Postherpetic neuralgia
Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of shingles. This is a disease caused by the varicella zoster virus, which also causes chicken pox. It can damage your nerves and lead to postherpetic neuralgia. Heightened sensitivity to touch is a potential symptom of postherpetic neuralgia.

 

What are the risk factors for allodynia?
If you have a parent who has fibromyalgia, you’re at higher risk of developing it and allodynia. Experiencing migraines, developing peripheral neuropathy, or getting shingles or chickenpox also raises your risk of developing allodynia.

How is allodynia diagnosed?
If you notice your skin has become more sensitive to touch than normal, you can start to diagnose yourself. You can do this by testing your nerve sensitivity. For example, try brushing a dry cotton pad on your skin. Next, apply a hot or cold compress on your skin. If you experience a painful tingling feeling in response to any of these stimuli, you might have allodynia. Make an appointment with your doctor to get a formal diagnosis.
Your doctor may conduct a variety of tests to assess your nerve sensitivity. They will also ask about your medical history and other symptoms that you might have. This can help them start to identify the cause of your allodynia. Be sure to answer their questions as honestly and completely as possible. Tell them about any pain in your extremities, headaches, poor wound healing, or other changes that you’ve noticed.
If they suspect you might have diabetes, your doctor will likely order blood tests to measure the level of glucose in your bloodstream. They might also order blood tests to check for other possible causes of your symptoms, such as thyroid disease or infection.

How is allodynia treated?
Depending on the underlying cause of your allodynia, your doctor might recommend medications, lifestyle changes, or other treatments.
For example, your doctor might prescribe medications such as lidocaine (Xylocaine) or pregabalin (Lyrica) to help ease your pain. They might also recommend taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as naproxen (Alleve). In some cases, your doctor might recommend treatment with electrical stimulation, hypnotherapy, or other complementary approaches.
It’s also important for your doctor to address the underlying condition that’s causing your allodynia. For instance, successful diabetes treatment can help improve diabetic neuropathy. This can help lower your risk of allodynia.
Lifestyle changes
Identifying triggers that make your allodynia worse can help you manage your condition.
If you experience migraine headaches, certain foods, beverages, or environments might trigger your symptoms. Consider using a journal to track your lifestyle habits and symptoms. Once you’ve identified your triggers, take steps to limit your exposure to them.
Managing stress is also important if you’re living with migraine headaches or fibromyalgia. Stress can bring on symptoms in both of these conditions. Practicing meditation or other relaxation techniques might help you reduce your stress levels.
Wearing clothes made of light fabrics and going sleeveless may also help, if your allodynia is triggered by the touch of clothing.
Social and emotional support
If treatment doesn’t relieve your pain, ask your doctor about mental health counseling. These services might help you learn to adjust to your changing physical health. For example, cognitive behavior therapy can help you change how you think about and react to difficult situations.
It might also help to seek the advice of other people with allodynia. For example, look for support groups in your community or online. In addition to sharing strategies to manage your symptoms, it might help to connect with others who understand your pain.

Article Provided By: healthline
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

0

The Common Symptoms of Neuralgia

The Common Symptoms of Neuralgia

By Erica Jacques.  Medically reviewed by Scott Zashin, MD
on July 05, 2020

Neuralgia is nerve pain that may be caused by many different things, including nerve damage, nerve irritation, infection, or other diseases. It is caused by irritation or damage to a nerve and is a sharp and very intense pain that follows the path of the nerve.

Neuralgia is also sometimes called neuropathy, neuropathic pain, or neurogenic pain. It is most common in older adults but can affect people of all ages.

Symptoms
How can you tell if the pain you are experiencing is neuralgia or some other type of pain? Neuralgia is typically more severe and has some distinct symptoms:1

Increased sensitivity: The skin along the path of the damaged nerve will be very sensitive, and any touch or pressure, even gentle, is painful.
Sharp or stabbing pain: Pain will occur along the path or the damaged nerve and will be felt in the same location each time. It often comes and goes but can also be constant and burning and may feel more intense when you move that area of your body.
Weakness: Muscles supplied by the damaged nerve may feel very weak or become completely paralyzed.

What Does Nerve Pain Feel Like?

Types
Certain painful conditions are classified as neuralgia because they are caused by nerve damage and lead to nerve pain. You can also experience neuralgia as a side effect of surgery. The pain can range in severity based on the extent of nerve damage and what nerves are affected.1

Some common types of neuralgia include:

Trigeminal neuralgia
Shingle pain
Diabetic neuropathy
Postoperative nerve pain
Pelvic nerve pain
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Sciatica

Treatment
Unfortunately, treating neuralgia is not an easy task and treatment will vary depending on the cause, location, and severity of your pain. The first step your doctor will likely take will be to identify the cause of the nerve problem and work to reverse or control it. He or she will also likely recommend pain medications to control your symptoms, including:1

Antidepressant medications
Antiseizure medications
Over-the-counter pain medications, such as aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen
Narcotic analgesics for short-term pain
Lidocaine patch
Capsaicin or lidocaine medicated skin creams

Other treatment options may include anesthetic shots, nerve blocks, physical therapy, surgery, nerve ablation, or complementary and alternative therapies. Talk to your doctor to discover the source of your pain and find out what treatments may work for you.

 

Article Provided By: verywellhealth
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

0
Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Relief, Chronic Pain, Chronic Pain Therapy, Pain Therpy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Treating Nerve Pain Caused by Cancer, HIV, and Other Conditions

Treating Nerve Pain Caused by Cancer, HIV, and Other Conditions

Nerve pain can be a symptom of many different conditions, including cancer, HIV, diabetes, and shingles. For some, nerve pain is frustrating; for others, nerve pain is devastating and life-changing.
Whether it feels like burning, pinpricks, or sudden shocks of electricity, nerve pain can disrupt your life at home and at work. It can limit your ability to get around. Over time, it can grind you down. Studies show that people with nerve pain have higher rates of sleep problems, anxiety, and depression.
When you have a serious medical condition such as cancer or HIV, dealing with the additional misery of nerve pain can be especially hard. But there is good news. While nerve pain can’t always be cured, it can be treated — and there are a lot of good options available.
If you’re struggling with nerve pain caused by diabetes, cancer, HIV or another condition, here are some answers.

What Causes Nerve Pain?
Countless nerves in the body convey sensations to the brain, including pain. While we might not like pain much, it does have an important function: it prevents injury. When your foot begins to step on a nail, it’s the pain sensation that alerts your brain to the danger.
That’s how it’s supposed to work, at least. But in people with nerve pain, that messaging system isn’t working correctly. Your brain receives a pain signal, and you feel the pain, but there’s no obvious cause. Now, it’s just pain without a purpose — and because of this, there’s no immediate way to relieve it. Since you can’t take away the external threat (there isn’t one), you have to treat the internal source of the pain or the experience.
What makes the nerves behave this way? Usually, it’s damage from a physical injury or disease.
Degenerative joint or disc disease in the spine with spinal cord or nerve compression are very common causes that nerve pain. Also a herniated disc can cause nerve pain.
Cancer and other tumors can cause nerve pain. As they grow, tumors can press on the surrounding nerves. Cancers can also grow out of the nerves themselves. Sometimes, treatments for cancer — such as chemotherapy drugs — can damage the nerves, leading to pain.
HIV can cause painful nerve damage. Nerve pain affects up to one-third of people with HIV, and nerve pain in the hands and feet is often the first symptom that appears. Treatment with antiretroviral drugs can also lead to nerve damage that causes pain.
Diabetes is a common cause of nerve damage in the U.S. Over time, high levels of glucose in the blood (blood sugar) can injure the nerves.
Shingles can be followed by a painful condition called postherpetic neuralgia. This type of nerve pain can be particularly severe and sudden.
Physical injuries can result in nerves that are compressed, crushed, or severed.
These are only a few examples of diseases and conditions that can cause nerve damage and nerve pain. Others include repetitive stress, vitamin deficiencies, hormone imbalances, heart disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Lyme disease, alcoholism, and more. In some cases, nerve pain develops for no apparent reason.
Nerve Pain Symptoms
Symptoms of nerve damage can vary from person to person. Sometimes, the nerves become hypersensitive. Something that normally feels painless — a breeze on your arm, the sensation of a bed sheet on your body — becomes painful.
Damage to the sensory nerves doesn’t only cause pain. It can also result in:
Numbness
Tingling
Pricking
Loss of reflexes
In extreme cases, nerve damage can cause paralysis and affect things like digestion and breathing.
The severity of nerve pain is usually linked to the severity of the underlying disease. So in general, nerve pain tends to be worse as people get older.
Diagnosing Nerve Pain
If you think you might have nerve pain, you need to see your doctor now. Sometimes, the cause might be fairly clear, especially if you have already been diagnosed with a condition known to cause nerve pain, like HIV, cancer, or diabetes.
But in other cases, the cause of nerve pain can be hard to sort out. Because so many conditions can trigger nerve pain, your doctor might need to run a number of lab tests. You’ll also need a thorough neurological exam, and possibly other tests — like CT scans, MRIs, nerve conduction studies and electromyographies. Sometimes, a doctor will recommend a biopsy of the skin or a nerve to examine the nerve endings.
Treating Nerve Pain
When nerve pain is caused by a condition like diabetes, HIV or cancer, getting treatment for the underlying disease is obviously the priority.
But treatments for the underlying disease might not necessarily help with your pain. Nerve pain may need its own treatment, separate from treatment for the disease that’s causing it.
The most effective and suitable treatment for nerve pain varies, because it depends on the specifics — like the patient’s health, the underlying cause, the risks of potential side effects, and the costs. However, doctors generally use the same set of treatments for nerve pain, whether it is caused by cancer, HIV, diabetes, or another condition. Here’s a rundown of the basic options.
Topical treatments. Some over-the-counter and prescription topical treatments — like creams, lotions, gels, and patches — can ease nerve pain. They tend to work best for pain that’s isolated in specific areas on your skin.
Anticonvulsants. These drugs were originally developed to treat epilepsy, but some also help control nerve pain. To boost their effects, they are often used in combination with antidepressants. They might not work as well with all types of nerve pain.
Antidepressants . Certain types of antidepressants can help with nerve pain. Studies have shown that using them along with anticonvulsants may have bigger benefits than using them alone. However, some studies have indicated that while tricyclic antidepressants may help with diabetic nerve pain, they might not help with nerve pain caused by HIV or cancer chemotherapy.
Painkillers. Powerful opioid painkillers might be a first choice for people with especially severe pain or nerve pain caused by cancer. However, for other kinds of nerve pain, doctors generally try anti-inflammatories, over the counter pain relievers, antidepressants and/or anticonvulsants first. Opioids can have serious side effects with a real potential for addiction. Over-the-counter painkillers may not work very well for moderate to severe nerve pain.
Electrical stimulation. A number of treatments use electrical impulses to block the pain messages sent by damaged nerves. These include TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS.) Both are noninvasive and painless. Some other electrical stimulation approaches are more complex and require surgery.
Other techniques. For nerve pain caused by bones or discs in your back, epidural injections with steroid can be very helpful. (There is a little lidocaine=anestheic in them, but mostly it’s the steroids that help.)
Complementary treatments. Many people find that alternative approaches — like acupuncture, meditation, and massage — can help relieve nerve pain. If you’re interested in dietary supplements for nerve pain, talk to your doctor first.
Lifestyle changes. While they won’t cure nerve pain, making some changes to your habits could help you feel better and ease some of your discomfort. Exercising more, eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking, and making time to practice relaxation techniques could all help.
The Costs of Untreated Nerve Pain
Nerve pain can make you feel terribly alone. After all, it’s not an injury that your family or friends can see. You might feel frustrated if they can’t understand what you’re feeling.
But while you might feel alone, you’re not. Experts believe that 40 million Americans are living with nerve pain. The impact of nerve pain is tremendous. Both the costs to the healthcare system as well as loss of wages and productivity are staggering.
Despite the significant price of nerve pain and the millions of people living with it, experts think that it is still underdiagnosed and undertreated. Studies show that even people who do seek out treatment often aren’t getting the right treatment. Too many rely on drugs that are unlikely to help.
So if you have nerve pain — whether it’s caused by diabetes, cancer, HIV, shingles, or another condition — you need to treat it seriously. Don’t assume that it will go away on its own. Don’t assume that following the treatment for the underlying disease will resolve it. Instead, talk to your doctor about treating your nerve pain directly.
WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on July 31, 2020

Article Provided By: webmd
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

0
Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Scrambler Therapy For Chemotherapy Neuropathy

Clinical Trial
Support Care Cancer
. 2020 Mar;28(3):1183-1197. doi: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3. Epub 2019 Jun 17.
Scrambler therapy for chemotherapy neuropathy: a randomized phase II pilot trial
Charles Loprinzi 1 , Jennifer G Le-Rademacher 2 , Neil Majithia 2 , Ryan P McMurray 2 , Carrie R O’Neill 2 , Markus A Bendel 2 , Andreas Beutler 2 , Daniel H Lachance 2 , Andrea Cheville 2 , David M Strick 2 , David F Black 2 , Jon C Tilburt 2 , Thomas J Smith 2
Affiliations Expand
PMID: 31209630 DOI: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3
Abstract
Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a prominent clinical problem, with limited effective therapies. Preliminary non-randomized clinical trial data support that Scrambler Therapy is helpful in this situation.
Methods: Patients were eligible if they had CIPN symptoms for at least 3 months and CIPN-related tingling or pain at least 4/10 in severity during the week prior to registration. They were randomized to receive Scrambler Therapy versus transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for 2 weeks. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were utilized to measure efficacy and toxicity daily for 2 weeks during therapy and then weekly for 8 additional weeks.
Results: This study accrued 50 patients, 25 to each of the 2 study arms; 46 patients were evaluable. There were twice as many Scrambler-treated patients who had at least a 50% documented improvement during the 2 treatment weeks, from their baseline pain, tingling, and numbness scores, when compared with the TENS-treated patients (from 36 to 56% compared with 16-28% for each symptom). Global Impression of Change scores for “neuropathy symptoms,” pain, and quality of life were similarly improved during the treatment weeks. Patients in the Scrambler group were more likely than those in the TENS group to recommend their treatment to other patients, during both the 2-week treatment period and the 8-week follow-up period (p < 0.0001). Minimal toxicity was observed.
Conclusions: The results from this pilot trial were positive, supporting the conduct of further investigations regarding the use of Scrambler Therapy for treating CIPN.
Keywords: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy; Scrambler; TENS.

Article Provided By: pubmed
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

0

Holiday Self Care

Holiday Self Care

Don’t Take a Vacation from Holiday Self Care!
The holiday season can be a stressful time for anyone, whether it’s the positive stress of gathering with loved ones or a more negative experience due to personal hardships. Of course, most of us have a mixed experience of both positive and negative stressors during the holidays.
When you are suffering from the discomfort or pain, holiday stress can take an even bigger toll—not just emotional but physical. You’re likely to be feeling more fatigue or a chronic pain flare-up during this time.
It may seem that self care is just another stressor during the holidays. Sticking to your at-home treatment protocol of a healthy diet, nutritional supplements, light exercise, and mindfulness practice may seem like an imposition or even just another thing on your rapidly growing to-do list!
But the truth is, the most positive step you can take to reduce neuropathy symptoms during the holidays is to prioritize your neuropathy self care above all else.
If you’ve already fallen off the wagon in terms of your neuropathy self care plan, then it’s important to realize that you don’t have to wait for a New Year’s resolution to get back on. You can start right now.
And if that feels too overwhelming, then remember that you can add in healthy habits just one at a time. Every small improvement will have a cumulative effect on your well-being and help reduce neuropathy symptoms.
Here are a few key elements of your at-home care to reduce pain, discomfort and often neuropathy symptoms and holiday stress:
A diet focused on plants & vegetables, with fewer simple carbs, sugars and unhealthy fats
Good hydration with plenty of water
Exercise as prescribed by your medical team, possibly including stretching, yoga, or other low-impact activities
Relaxation exercises or meditation
Above all, try to maintain focus on the joys and pleasures of the holiday season and let go of any preconceptions about how things should go.

 

Article Provided By: neuropathydr
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

0

Chronic Pain During the Holidays

Chronic Pain During the Holidays
No matter what holiday you celebrate, this time of year can be a lot. There are elaborate dinners to prepare, parties to host and attend, presents to find, decorations to hang, families to visit, traditions to respect, and very little time for self-care. But your body doesn’t know that, and chronic pain is, if anything, exacerbated by stress and busy schedules.
Here are some tips to help you survive the holidays, pain or no pain:
1. BE REALISTIC
Tempering the holiday madness may not sound like much fun, but if you start off with unrealistic expectations, then no matter how hard you try, you’ll never quite manage. If your physical ability is less than it was last year, adjust your schedule and chores accordingly. Don’t take on more than you know you can manage – that’s just setting yourself up for failure. Consider what’s practical, and use that as your starting point for all your holiday plans.
2. SHARE THE LOAD
A lot of people try to do it all themselves, but the holidays are meant to be a family affair! So don’t be afraid to share the workload. For parties, consider going potluck. For the main event, share cooking responsibilities by assigning someone to each dish. This ensures that even if you have a bad day, there will still be a good meal for everyone. Ask others to help you decorate, ask the kids to pitch in, or pay the neighbor’s kid to shovel your porch. You do not have to do everything yourself.
3. SHOP ONLINE
Online shopping is a godsend, especially for those who struggle to fight their way around malls at this busy time of year. And it’s not just for gifts. You can order groceries, alcohol, decorations, and even cards online. This helps streamline your chores and minimizes energy spent.
4. PLAN FOR DOWNTIME
When everything feels like a rush, it can be hard to shoehorn in time for yourself. So don’t rely on doing this in the moment – plan for it. Deliberately set aside some time each day to rest and recuperate. Avoid scheduling multiple energy-intensive activities on back-to-back days, and arrange to have a day off after big events. You have to be proactive here, as otherwise your time will fill up without you even realizing!
5. KEEP TO NORMAL ROUTINES
Keeping a routine is tough during the holidays, as many of the touchstones are gone. You may be off work, the kids are home, there could be family staying with you – everything is all over the place! But sticking to your usual, tried-and-tested routines will never matter more. Keep your medication schedule, your sleep schedule, and your exercise routine. This helps you feel as well as you can, each and every day, no matter what else is going on.
6. BE ORGANIZED
No matter how much you scale back, there is still a laundry list of things to do over the holidays. You can get a lot done, even with chronic pain, if you remain organized. Make a list of all of your tasks, and prioritize them. Know in advance what you can let slide and what has to be done. Set a schedule and stick to it. It’s incredibly tempting to get caught up in holiday cheer and ignore warning signals, so set a hard “out” time for events in advance. This ensures you take care of your body, no matter what your heart may be telling you!
“YOU ARE IN CONTROL OF WHAT YOU CHOOSE TO CARE ABOUT AND WHERE YOU SPEND YOUR ENERGY; DON’T LET OTHER PEOPLE’S ABILITIES, SUCCESSES, OR EFFORTS IMPACT HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT WHAT YOU CAN DO.”7. DRIVE TWO CARS TO EVENTS
Guilt for dampening loved ones’ merriment can be a big issue, so plan ahead to avoid it. Driving two cars to an event means that you can leave when you need to, without hindering anyone else’s fun. It gives you and your loved ones maximum flexibility. Difficulty driving? Plan in advance to take a taxi or Uber home early.
8. COMMUNICATE
You are not the only person who will be stressed over the holidays. It’s pretty much guaranteed that everyone else is feeling rushed and a little overwhelmed. This may mean that usually sensitive or helpful friends and family suddenly seem less caring, or too busy for what you need. It’s important to understand that this isn’t about you. Remember to cut them some slack for any thoughtlessness, and be clear when stating what you need and what you can and can’t do.
9. ENJOY YOURSELF
With all this talk about “coping” and “managing” and “chores,” it can be easy to forget the holidays are supposed to be a time of fun. So don’t forget to have some! Make time for yourself and what you enjoy, even if it means saying no to someone else. You don’t have unlimited energy or strength, and you can’t do everything. Be kind to yourself, and choose one or two special activities that are just for you.
10. REMEMBER: IT’S NOT A COMPETITION
This time of year can sometimes feel like a never-ending exercise in living up to (or failing) other people’s expectations. But it doesn’t have to be. It doesn’t matter how amazing your neighbor’s decorations are, or the face your mother-in-law makes when she sees your store-bought holiday spread. You are in control of what you choose to care about and where you spend your energy; don’t let other people’s abilities, successes, or efforts impact how you feel about what you can do. Being in chronic pain is hard enough without all of the judgement, so let it go. It doesn’t matter what anyone else has done.
Shared from the US Pain Foundation.

Article Provided By: chicagoneuropain
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

0

Top Twenty Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy

Top Twenty Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy
By LtCol Eugene B Richardson, USA (Retired) BA, MDiv, EdM, MS14 Comments

Each person’s experience varies depending on their type of Neuropathy, but in general following are the most common Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy:
1) Severe strange pains in your feet, legs, hands and other parts of the body; including “crawling insects” under your skin;
2) Balance is difficult when walking, getting dressed, getting out of bed or whenever you close your eyes;
3) Numbness / heavy / cardboard / heavy cement feeling/ Novocain feeling in your feet and legs;
4) Tingling or “vibration” like feelings in your feet and hands;
5) Electric shocks starting at the bottom of your feet/foot that shoot up your leg(s) and on almost any part of the body;
6) Bone pain especially in the feet on walking or standing;
7) Painful muscle spasms/cramps;
8) Skin may become painful to touch or loss of the feeling of touch; with Agent Orange skin rash;
9) Burning sensations in your feet and hands;
10) Loss, or lessening, of sensation for hot and cold;
11) Feeling like you are wearing socks when you are not;
12) The feeling you are walking on crumpled socks or stones;
13) Feet feel swollen or large;
14) Difficulty moving your hands or feet;
15) A feeling of clumsiness, tripping (foot drop) or dropping things;
16) Attacks of daily severe exhaustion with strange fatigue;
In more severe case of Peripheral Neuropathy you may also experience the following:
17) Problems with not sweating in lower body with excessive sweating in upper body;
18) Digestive (fullness; alternating diarrhea / constipation) and/or urinary problems (overflow incontinence);
19) Sexual problems (loss of sensation/feeling/moisture);
20) A tightening of your chest with an increased difficulty in breathing and/or swallowing; uncorrectable vision problems.

 

Article Provided By: neuropathyjournal
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

0

What You Should Know About Neuropathic Pain

What You Should Know About Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain is a pain condition that’s usually chronic. It’s usually caused by chronic, progressive nerve disease, and it can also occur as the result of injury or infection.
If you have chronic neuropathic pain, it can flare up at any time without an obvious pain-inducing event or factor. Acute neuropathic pain, while uncommon, can occur as well.
Typically, non-neuropathic pain (nociceptive pain) is due to an injury or illness. For example, if you drop a heavy book on your foot, your nervous system sends signals of pain immediately after the book hits.
With neuropathic pain, the pain isn’t typically triggered by an event or injury. Instead, the body just sends pain signals to your brain unprompted.
People with this pain condition may experience shooting, burning pain. The pain may be constant, or may occur intermittently. A feeling of numbness or a loss of sensation is common, too.
Neuropathic pain tends to get worse over time.
About 1 in 3 Americans experience chronic pain. Of those, 1 in 5 experience neuropathic pain.
A 2014 study estimated that as many as 10 percent of Americans experience some form of neuropathic pain.
Understanding the possible causes can help you find better treatments and ways to prevent the pain from getting worse over time.
What causes neuropathic pain?
The most common causes for neuropathic pain can be divided into four main categories: disease, injury, infection, and loss of limb.
Disease
Neuropathic pain can be a symptom or complication of several diseases and conditions. These include multiple sclerosis, multiple myeloma, and other types of cancer.
Not everyone with these conditions will experience neuropathic pain, but it can be an issue for some.
Diabetes is responsible for 30 percent of neuropathic cases, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Chronic diabetes can impact how your nerves work.
People with diabetes commonly experience loss of feeling and numbness, following by pain, burning, and stinging, in their limbs and digits.
Long-term excessive alcohol intake can cause many complications, including chronic neuropathic pain. Damage to nerves from chronic alcohol use can have long-lasting and painful effects.
Trigeminal neuralgia is a painful condition with severe neuropathic pain of one side of the face. It’s one of the more common types of neuropathic pain and it can occur without a known reason.
Lastly, cancer treatment may cause neuropathic pain. Chemotherapy and radiation can both impact the nervous system and cause unusual pain signals.
Injuries
Injuries to tissue, muscles, or joints are an uncommon cause of neuropathic pain. Likewise, back, leg, and hip problems or injuries can cause lasting damage to nerves.
While the injury may heal, the damage to the nervous system may not. As a result, you may experience persistent pain for many years after the accident.
Accidents or injuries that affect the spine can cause neuropathic pain, too. Herniated discs and spinal cord compression can damage the nerve fibers around your spine.
Infection
Infections rarely cause neuropathic pain.
Shingles, which is caused by reactivation of the chicken pox virus, can trigger several weeks of neuropathic pain along a nerve. Postherpetic neuralgia is a rare complication of shingles, involving persistent neuropathic pain.
A syphilis infection can also lead to the burning, stinging unexplained pain. People with HIV may experience this unexplained pain.
Limb loss
An uncommon form of neuropathic pain called phantom limb syndrome can occur when an arm or leg has been amputated. Despite the loss of that limb, your brain still thinks it’s receiving pain signals from the removed body part.
What’s actually happening, however, is that the nerves near the amputation are misfiring and sending faulty signals to your brain.
In addition to arms or legs, phantom pain may be felt in the fingers, toes, penis, ears, and other body parts.
Other causes
Other causes of neuropathic pain include:
vitamin B deficiency
carpal tunnel syndrome
thyroid problems
facial nerve problems
arthritis in the spine

What are the symptoms?
Each person’s symptoms of neuropathic pain may vary slightly, but these symptoms are common:
shooting, burning, or stabbing pain
tingling and numbness, or a “pins and needles” feeling
spontaneous pain, or pain that occurs without a trigger
evoked pain, or pain that’s caused by events that are typically not painful — such as rubbing against something, being in cold temperatures, or brushing your hair
a chronic sensation of feeling unpleasant or abnormal
difficulty sleeping or resting
emotional problems as a result of chronic pain, loss of sleep, and difficulty expressing how you’re feeling

How’s it treated?
A goal of neuropathic pain treatment is to identify the underlying disease or condition that’s responsible for the pain, and treat it, if possible.
An important goal is that your doctor will aim to provide pain relief, help you maintain typical capabilities despite the pain, and improve your quality of life.
The most common treatments for neuropathic pain include:
Over-the-counter pain medication
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as Aleve and Motrin, are sometimes used to treat neuropathic pain.
However, many people find these medicines aren’t effective for neuropathic pain because they don’t target the source of the pain.
Prescription medication
Opioid pain medications don’t usually reduce neuropathic pain as well as they reduce other types of pain. Plus, doctors may hesitate to prescribe them for fear that a person may become dependent.
Topical pain relievers can be used, too. These include lidocaine patches, capsaicin patches, and prescription-strength ointments and creams.
Antidepressant drugs
Antidepressant medications have shown great promise in treating symptoms of neuropathic pain.
Two common types of antidepressant drugs are prescribed to people with this condition:
tricyclic antidepressants
serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors
These may treat both the pain and symptoms of depression or anxiety caused by chronic pain.
Anticonvulsants
Anti-seizure medications and anticonvulsants are often used to treat neuropathic pain. Gabapentinoids are most commonly prescribed for neuropathic pain.
It’s not clear why anti-seizure drugs work for this condition, but researchers believe the medications interfere with pain signals and stop faulty transmissions.
Nerve blocks
Your doctor may inject steroids, local anesthetics, or other pain medications into the nerves that are thought to be responsible for the wayward pain signals. These blocks are temporary, so they must be repeated in order to keep working.
Implantable device
This invasive procedure requires a surgeon to implant a device in your body. Some devices are used in the brain and some are used in the spine.
Once a device is in place, it can send electrical impulses into the brain, spinal cord, or nerves. The impulses may stop the irregular nerve signals and control symptoms.
These devices are typically used only in individuals who haven’t responded well to other treatment options.
Lifestyle treatments
Physical, relaxation, and massage therapies are all used to relieve symptoms of neuropathic pain. These forms of treatment can help ease muscles.
Your healthcare provider can also teach you ways to cope with your pain.
For example, some people with neuropathic pain may experience increased symptoms after sitting for several hours. This might make desk jobs difficult to perform.
A physical therapist or occupational therapist can teach you techniques for sitting, stretching, standing, and moving to prevent pain.

 

How can this pain be managed?
If your doctor is able to identify an underlying cause for the neuropathic pain, treating it may reduce and even eliminate the pain.
For example, diabetes is a common cause of neuropathic pain. Proper diabetes care — which includes a healthy diet and regular exercise — may eliminate or reduce neuropathic pain.
Taking care of blood sugar levels can also prevent worsening pain and numbness.
Multimodal therapy
A multipronged approach can be an effective way to manage the condition.
A combination of medications, physical therapy, psychological treatment, and even surgery or implants may be used to bring about the best results.

Outlook
Neuropathic pain can negatively impact your life if you don’t take steps to treat it and prevent worsening symptoms.
Over time, this can lead to serious disability and complications, including depression, problems sleeping, anxiety, and more.
Fortunately, researchers are learning more about why this condition develops and what can be done to effectively treat it. That’s leading to better treatment options.
Finding the correct treatment options for you can take time, but you and your doctor can work together to find relief from the symptoms of this painful condition.

Article Provided By: healthline
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

0

The Ideal Diet For Reducing Neuropathy Symptoms

The Ideal Diet For Reducing Neuropathy Symptoms

Written by Marriane Sokolowska
Last updated: September 11th, 2019 06:27 pm

If you suffer from neuropathy, then you will probably have considered many different remedies and medicine.
However, it is also likely that you haven’t yet considered the importance of a good diet to help you manage your symptoms and perhaps even reverse some of the damage.
There is, however, more and more research to demonstrate that there is a direct link between the foods we eat and our nervous system, both positive and negative.

Importance of Good Nutrition for Preventing Neuropathy
In fact, the first line of defense when it comes to preventative medicine is good nutrition, and the same is true for peripheral neuropathy.
Once you have developed it, diet continues to be important in terms of managing and reducing your symptoms, and even healing your nerves.
Neuropathy is often caused by other conditions, most notably diabetes, so it is very important that you control your blood sugar level in order to avoid neuropathy. Similarly, excessive alcohol consumption can lead to certain vitamin B deficiencies, again leading to neuropathy.
Regardless of whether you have neuropathy, cancer, diabetes, an addiction disorder, or any other problem, it is important that you should eat a diet rich in lean protein, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.

Keep A Food Diary
You may also want to consider keeping a food diary, particularly if you have neuropathy, as this will help you to identify which foods make you feel better, or worse.
Neuropathy can be improved or worsened depending on what you eat. There are foods that can cause further damage to the nerves, weakening them even more. It is important, therefore, to know not just what to eat, but also what to avoid in order to stop your tingling, numbness, and/or nerve pain from getting worse.
At the same time, you can consume foods that make your nerves stronger, thereby improving your existing condition and avoiding it from getting any worse.
In fact, there are even foods that can help to repair any nerves that have been damaged, which means you could get full relief of your symptoms. So what are the foods you really should include, and what should you avoid?
Foods to Include for Reducing Symptoms of Neuropathy
Ginger

This is surprising to many people but ginger is a strong, natural, pain reliever. This means that it can help you feel a lot better. Added to that, it contains gingerols, which have anti-inflammatory properties, thereby increasing mobility in people with serious and chronic pain and helping them to become more mobile.
Water

Water has to be a standard component of any healthy diet. It isn’t a miraculous healer in terms of neuropathy, but what it can do is provide relief from inflammation. This means that the pain you experience as part of neuropathy does not get any worse.
When you start to get dehydrated, your blood starts to thicken and your muscles go into spasm. As a result, inflammation occurs and affects areas where pain receptors and nerves are located. If you ensure that you are always hydrated, your overall bodily functions are better able to function as well, thereby increasing your overall well being.
Fruits and vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are filled with various minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and dietary fibers. Put together, these help to create a strong immune system while at the same time preventing and fighting disease and illness.
People who have neuropathy should increase their intake of fruits and vegetables immediately. Many people who have neuropathy also have diabetes, and eating plenty of fruits and vegetables means that you will also be better able to control the symptoms of diabetes.
You should try to eat at least five portions of different fruits and vegetables every day in order to see some real results. Try to choose those that have very high levels of antioxidants, including berries, cherries, grapefruit, oranges, Brussels sprouts, onions, and bell peppers.
Another great benefit of fruits and vegetables is that you can purchase them ready to eat. As a result, you don’t have to do a lot of work in the kitchen, which means you will feel much less stressed as well.
Lean protein

Lean protein is necessary for your body to be able to build and repair new tissue. It is important to stick to lean protein, however, so that you don’t eat too many animal fats. Good sources include low fat dairy and poultry, and people with peripheral or diabetic neuropathy should consider increasing their level of consumption.
Avoid eating processed foods, as well as foods with high trans and saturated fats, including deep fried foods, cheese, butter, whole milk, and fatty meat. Not only can these make your neuropathy worse, they can also lead to heart disease, high cholesterol, and diabetes.
You should try to add things like fish, tofu, yogurt, low fat milk, legumes, and skinless poultry to your diet, for balanced nutrition, for the best results. Lean protein is not just important to combat neuropathy, it is also has a positive influence on your blood sugar level.
Foods to Avoid
Peripheral and diabetic neuropathy can be caused or worsened by vitamin deficiencies, diabetes, traumatic injuries, alcoholism, and more. To treat it, you will often have to find a way to manage that underlying cause, which includes medication and therapy, but you should also take a close look to your diet as there are foods that can make it worse. These include:
Gluten

Avoid gluten, particularly, if you have celiac disease. If you are allergic to gluten, consuming it can trigger neuropathy or make symptoms much worse. Gluten can be found in any product made with baking, cake, wheat, or white flower. Hence, switch to gluten free if necessary.
Refined grains

These have a high glycemic level. This means that they significantly impact your blood sugar. You must be able to control your insulin and glucose levels if you are to control diabetic neuropathy in particular. In order to have a better glycemic impact on your diet, you should consume whole grains instead of refined grains
Sugar

This adds a lot of flavor to foods, but little to no nutrients. When you have a nutritional deficiency, it is much easier to experience neuropathy. You should eat lots of whole grains and vegetables and for that occasional sweet treat, fresh fruits.
Saturated fats

These are found mainly in whole fat dairy products and fatty meats. They can lead to inflammation, as well as increasing your chance of having type 2 diabetes.
Final Thoughts
Due to a number of factors, including the amount of toxins in our environment and the poor mineral quality of our soil, the foods we eat are becoming less nutrient dense than in previous generations.
Therefore, it is vital to not only eat organic fruits and vegetables like those listed above, but to also take supplements with your diet to get the proper vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that support optimal nerve health.
You may, for even better effects, also want to consider supplementing your diet with a product like Nerve Renew which is designed for supporting healthy nerves and reducing pain.

 

Article Provided By: nervepaintreatment
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

0

Allodynia

What to know about allodynia

Someone who has allodynia feels pain from non-painful stimuli. For example, a person may feel pain from a light touch or when brushing their hair.
Allodynia can be a symptom of several different nerve conditions, or it can occur on its own.
Allodynia is not the same thing as an increased response to painful stimuli.

Some people feel extreme pain from something minor, such as a paper cut. Feeling increased pain or being hypersensitive to mild pain is called hyperalgesia.
Individuals with allodynia, however, feel pain when something is ordinarily painless.
Symptoms

Allodynia is characterized by intense feelings of pain with no clear cause.
Pain is one of the body’s protective mechanisms. It tells a person to stop doing something that is harmful.
For instance, a pain response causes a person to pull their hand away from a hot stove, preventing a severe burn. But people with allodynia perceive pain even though there is nothing harmful causing the pain.
The main symptom of allodynia is pain from non-painful stimuli.
Some people with allodynia may experience severe pain even from a few hairs brushing against their skin.
Symptoms can vary from mild to severe. Some people may feel a burning sensation while others feel an ache or squeezing pain.
Allodynia can limit the activities a person is able to do and decrease their quality of life. Common complications of allodynia include:
depression
anxiety
sleep disturbances
fatigue

Types of allodynia
There are three main types of allodynia, which are classified according to what causes the pain.
Regardless of the type of allodynia, pain is still the main symptom. Some people may only have one type of allodynia. Others may have all three types of the condition.
Types of allodynia include:
Thermal allodynia: Thermal allodynia causes temperature-related pain. Pain occurs due to a mild change of temperature on the skin. For example, a few drops of cold water on the skin may be painful.
Mechanical allodynia: Movement across the skin causes mechanical allodynia. For instance, bedsheets pulled across a person’s skin may be painful.
Tactile allodynia: Tactile allodynia, also called static allodynia, occurs due to light touch or pressure on the skin. For example, a tap on the shoulder may cause pain for someone with tactile allodynia.

Causes and risk factors

Something as simple as hair being brushed may cause intense pain to someone with allodynia.
The exact cause of allodynia is not known.
Allodynia may occur due to increased responsiveness or malfunction of nociceptors, which are a particular type of nerve.
Having one of the following medical conditions may also increase a person’s risk of developing allodynia.
Migraines: Migraines can cause debilitating head pain, but a headache is often not the only symptom. Migraines can also cause additional symptoms, such as nausea and sensitivity to sound and light. According to the American Migraine Foundation, up to 80 percent of people experience symptoms of allodynia during a migraine.
Postherpetic neuralgia: Postherpetic neuralgia is a complication of shingles, which is caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox. Shingles can cause damage to the nerve fibers, which leads to persistent nerve pain and is associated with allodynia.
Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a medical condition that causes widespread pain in the body. The cause of fibromyalgia is not known, but there does appear to be a genetic link in some instances. There also seems to be a connection between allodynia and fibromyalgia.
Diabetes: Over time, diabetes can cause damage to nerves, increasing the likelihood that a person will develop allodynia. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is essential to the nervous system, and some experts have suggested that diabetes can lower NGF levels. A recent study in rodents showed that low levels of NGF led to both hyperalgesia and allodynia.
Complex regional pain syndrome: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a long-term pain condition that tends to affect one limb, typically after the person injures the area. People believe CRPS occurs due to problems with the nervous systems.

Diagnosis and when to see a doctor
There is not one specific medical test to diagnose allodynia. Instead, a doctor will perform a physical exam, take a medical history, and review a person’s symptoms.
Many common conditions can cause chronic pain, so doctors may need to rule out certain medical conditions before they can make a diagnosis of allodynia.
Various nerve sensitivity tests may also be performed to help make a diagnosis.
Anyone who experiences pain from non-painful stimuli, such as light touch, should see their doctor.
Dealing with chronic pain that develops after even the mildest touch can be frustrating and upsetting. Receiving an accurate diagnosis can help someone start the treatment and management process.

Treatment

Topical creams may help to treat the symptoms of allodynia. Recommended treatment will be based on the cause of the condition.
Currently, there is no cure for allodynia. Treatment is aimed at decreasing pain, using medications and lifestyle changes.
Pregabalin is a medication used to treat nerve pain associated with conditions, such as spinal cord injuries, diabetes, fibromyalgia, and shingles. It may also decrease pain in some people with allodynia.
Topical pain medications, such as creams and ointments containing lidocaine, may be helpful in some cases. Over-the-counter, non-steroidal medicines may also be effective.
Complementary approaches to pain management, such as acupuncture and massage, may not be tolerated as they involve touch and can lead to discomfort for a person with allodynia.
Treating an underlying condition that is causing allodynia may also help. For example, preventing migraines or treating migraines straightaway can help reduce the risk of allodynia symptoms. Getting diabetes under good control can also be helpful.
Some people might find that lifestyle changes, such as light exercise, a healthful diet, and getting enough sleep might help.
Research shows that smokers experience more chronic pain than nonsmokers. Quitting smoking can be beneficial on many levels, from improving circulation to decreasing inflammation.
Although living a healthful lifestyle will not cure allodynia, it can enhance overall health and help people with the condition cope more efficiently.
Identifying and decreasing pain triggers as much as possible may also reduce symptoms. It may not be possible to limit all the things that cause discomfort, but some changes may help.
For example, it might not be reasonable for someone to shave their head if brushing their hair hurts. But switching to a different type of brush or brushing it less frequently may be possible.
Similarly, if certain fabrics hurt the skin, a person can try clothing made of a different, less irritating material.
Stress may make the pain worse in some people. So, learning stress management techniques may also help.
Although stress reduction may not improve allodynia in every case, developing better stress management techniques can help a person cope with their condition.

Outlook
Allodynia is not life-threatening, but it can make daily life difficult and cause frustrating limitations. It can also lead to anxiety and other mental health conditions.
The outlook for people with allodynia varies depending on the severity of the condition. Taking a comprehensive approach to treatment can improve the outlook.
Using a combination of pain management techniques along with lifestyle changes may decrease symptoms of allodynia.
A holistic approach can also help someone feel more in control of their condition and improve their overall quality of life.

Article Provided By: medicalnewstoday
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

1 2 3