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Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Eliminate Stress for Pain Relief

Something that most of us out there aren’t familiar with is that stress can often cause pain. Considering how much responsibilities one has to deal with, an individual gets stressed out easily. And this stress can cause you not only to suffer emotionally but also physically as well.

Both stress and pain walk hand in hand, and that is why both have an impact on one another. Increased stress can cause one to suffer from chronic pain as well, and the only way to get rid of such kind of unfortunate pain is by getting rid of your stress.

To get rid of your pain, get rid of your stress:

Studies also claim that if you’re suffering from depression and anxiety, then you are likely to suffer from pain as well. So, if you’re experiencing severe pain then you might be extremely stressed out and as both impact each other, if your pain decreases your stress level will decrease as well.

Though the reason why these both a link to each is still uncertain, however, it is seen that people often suffer from neck, shoulder and back pain because they are stressed out. This could be because of brain chemicals, or it could be because of the link between stress and tension in the muscles. When one experiences this pain, the brain tries to minimize the signals so that there is a balance maintained and the person is able to function. However, chronic pain can offset the balance.

Your brain is always trying to inhibit the pain signals, however, if you’re completely stressed out then the brain’s ability to filter the pain signals fails and the pain increases. You must understand that if you’ve managed your stress then only will any sort of therapy work on you.

Here are some easy-to-follow tips for you to try out:

  • Move around and be active, this will reduce your stress level. Make sure to include some sort of exercise in your daily life; you can go for a jog, walk or bike around. Consult your doctor and find out how exercising will help with your pain.
  • Make sure to get a proper sleep so that you can deal with any sort of stress.
  • Take out time for yourself, improvise your daily routine and add activities that help you in relaxing.
  • Do yoga; meditate, take deep breaths to relax your mind and body. These exercises will reduce your stress level, and you can do them whenever you like.
  • You can even take out the time and visit a mental health professional, to help you with your stress and pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Relief, Chronic Pain, Chronic Pain Therapy, Pain Therpy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Managing Peripheral Neuropathy

There is no sure way to prevent chemo-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), but there are things you can do to manage your symptoms. During treatment, your cancer care team will ask you about your symptoms and watch you to see if the CIPN is getting worse. Your team may need to delay your treatment, use smaller doses of the chemo drugs, or stop treatment with the drug that is causing the CIPN until your symptoms get better. These actions must be started right away to prevent long-term damage that won’t get better.

Can CIPN be treated?

Treatment can often help ease some of the symptoms of CIPN. Sometimes these symptoms go away a short time after treatment is done. But sometimes they last much longer and need long-term treatment. Severe CIPN may never go away.

Treatment is mostly given to relieve the pain that can come with CIPN. Some of the drugs used include:

  • Steroids for a short time until a long-term treatment plan is in place
  • Patches or creams of numbing medicine that can be put right on the painful area (for example, lidocaine patches or capsaicin cream)
  • Antidepressant medicines, often in smaller doses than are used to treat depression
  • Anti-seizure medicines, which are used to help many types of nerve pain
  • Opioids or narcotics, for when pain is severe

Researchers are looking at which drugs work best to relieve this kind of pain. It may take more than one try to find out what works best for you.

Other treatments that can be tried to ease nerve pain and its effects on your life include:

  • Electrical nerve stimulation
  • Occupational therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Relaxation therapy
  • Guided imagery
  • Distraction
  • Acupuncture
  • Biofeedback

What can I do to deal with CIPN?

There are some things you can do to better manage the symptoms of CIPN, such as:

  • Talk to your doctor or nurse about the problems you are having in daily life. They might be able to suggest ways to make you feel better or function better.
  • If you are taking pain medicines, use them as your doctor prescribes them. Most pain medicines work best if they are taken before the pain gets bad. See Cancer Pain to learn more about pain, how to talk about it, and how to manage it.
  • Avoid things that seem to make your CIPN worse, such as hot or cold temperatures, or snug clothes or shoes.
  • Give yourself extra time to do things. Ask friends for help with tasks you find hard to do.
  • Don’t drink alcohol. It can cause nerve damage on its own, and might make CIPN worse.
  • If you have diabetes, control your blood sugar. High blood sugar levels can damage nerves.
  • If constipation is a problem, follow your doctor’s recommendations about laxatives and exercise. Drink plenty of water and eat fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to get enough fiber.
  • If the neuropathy is in your feet, sit down as much as possible, even while brushing your teeth or cooking.
  • If your neuropathy is permanent, your doctor may refer you to an occupational therapist (OT). They are experts who help people lead more normal lives despite physical limits.

What should I do to avoid injury?

When your sense of feeling is affected by CIPN, you might be more likely to injure yourself by accident. Here are some things you can do to stay safe:

  • If you have neuropathy in your hands, be very careful when using knives, scissors, box cutters, and other sharp objects. Use them only when you can give your full attention to your task.
  • Protect your hands by wearing gloves when you clean, work outdoors, or do repairs.
  • Take care of your feet. Look at them once a day to see if you have any injuries or open sores.
  • Always wear shoes that cover your whole foot when walking, even at home. Talk to your doctor about shoes or special inserts that can help protect your feet.
  • Be sure that you have ways to support yourself if you have problems with stumbling while walking. Hand rails in hallways and bathrooms may help you keep your balance. A walker or cane can give you extra support.
  • Use night lights or flashlights when getting up in the dark.
  • Protect yourself from heat injuries. Set hot water heaters between 105° to 120°F to reduce scalding risk while washing your hands. Use oven gloves and hot pads when handling hot dishes, racks, or pans. Check bath water with a thermometer.
  • Keep your hands and feet warm and well covered in cold weather. For example, consider keeping a pair of gloves in your car. Avoid extreme temperatures.

What questions should I ask about CIPN?

Here are some questions you might want to ask your health care team:

  • Is the chemo I’m getting likely to cause CIPN?
  • Am I at high risk for CIPN?
  • What symptoms do I need to watch for and report to you?
  • Have you treated CIPN in other patients? How? Did it work?
  • If my CIPN gets bad and is very painful, will it change my treatment plan?
  • Is it likely that my CIPN will get better or go away after treatment is over?

Talk to your health care team

It’s important to work closely with your doctor or nurse to manage peripheral neuropathy caused by chemotherapy. Talk to your doctor about any changes in how you feel, and any trouble you have walking or holding things. Tell the doctor how your symptoms affect the things you do every day.

If you get medicines to help CIPN, be sure to keep your doctor posted on whether the drugs are helping and if new problems start up. You might also want to talk with your doctor about whether you can get into a clinical trial to help deal with your CIPN.

If you are concerned about how future treatment might affect your quality of life, talk with your doctor about what’s most important to you. Remember that only you can decide whether you want to get, or keep getting, a certain treatment.

Article Provided By: American Cancer Society

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chemotherapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain Therapy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Symptoms of DPN

What is diabetic peripheral neuropathy?

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating.

Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms.

Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing.

What causes nerve damage?

Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves.

A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation.

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later.

Feeling numbness

A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking.

Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not.

Shooting pain

Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware.

You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Loss of balance

Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can result from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Wearing orthopedic shoes often helps with this.

Loss of coordination is a common sign of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Often, muscle weakness affects the ankle, which can affect your gait. Numbness in the feet can also contribute to loss of balance.

Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

People with Chronic Pain Need to Know

People with chronic pain find that pain is a unique experience. One person may have a different experience dealing with pain than another person, in a similar situation. Pain is more than an unpleasant feeling. It also involves your emotions to events that trigger the pain, such as a car accident or a surgery.

It is hard for a patient, alone, to deal with chronic pain and its related problems such as insomnia and depression. A pain management doctor can help you through this difficult experience. As a patient, you need to take control over your pain, by getting the help that is needed and working with your treatment team to get better.

Understanding chronic pain

Chronic pain outlasts what is considered a normal healing time of three to six months, and can become a disease in itself. It starts in the setting of injury or even without a known trigger. You can understand chronic pain better, by comparing it to acute pain.

Chronic pain vs. acute pain

Acute pain is the short-term pain you feel when you burn your hand, sprain your wrist, or pull a muscle. Your body is warning you to stop a harmful behavior, modify activity to reduce strain on the injured area and seek treatment. 

With chronic pain, the nervous system begins to adjust to ongoing pain signals, and the nerves become overactive. This becomes a persistent issue, that can lead to other problems like sleeplessness, depression, or anxiety. 

While acute pain acts like a fire alarm that tells you to find and remove the danger, chronic pain acts like a fire alarm that can’t shut off and keeps ringing long after the fire goes out.

Chronic pain and your central nervous system

Early Greeks and Romans believed that the brain plays a role in feeling pain. Although modern science supports this view, we now understand that our pain-sensing system is far more complex than the simple view of the old. The central nervous system (the brain and the spinal cord) is your body’s control center when it comes to pain. 

Pain can be either magnified or reduced in the brain and spinal cord, based on a series of relay stations that occur throughout the nervous system’s pain signaling pathway. This process starts when the pain signals in the body get turned on more easily. As a result, a person can become more sensitive and feel moderate to severe pain even with normal stimuli or mild pressure, like a light brush against the skin.

Recognizing chronic pain

Although pain starts at a small level in the brain and spinal cord, it can have a big effect on your life.

Signs of chronic pain:

  • Pain lasts over six months
  • The amount of pain you feel seems greater than what you would expect
  • Sometimes, there is pain without a known cause
  • Sleeplessness, anxiety, depression develop

Causes of chronic pain

Chronic pain can start after direct tissue damage, as a result of an illness, or after nerve damage. 

Conditions that result in chronic pain:

  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Neck/back radiculopathy  (herniated disc presses on a spinal nerve)
  • Diabetic neuropathy (hand and foot numbness)
  • Myofascial pain syndrome (muscle pain)
  • Post-surgical pain syndrome (long-term pain after surgery)
  • Phantom limb pain (pain and sensation that a leg or arm is still there after amputation)

Finding the source of pain

Your doctor diagnoses your pain, after a thorough medical history and exam. A description of your pain’s location, duration, and pattern, leads a doctor to the correct diagnosis. Tests such as X-rays, MRIs, CAT scans, may reveal why you are having pain. 

Braking the pain cycle

Several everyday habits can help you gain control over your chronic pain:

  1. Stay ahead of the pain – take your medications on a schedule
  2. Find what increases your pain and try to work around it – for some that means rest, and for others it means greater activity
  3. Remain active – people with chronic pain exercise less and have increased risk for cardiovascular problems
  4. Avoid stress – the sympathetic (flight or fight) response triggered by stress, can increase pain
  5. Get enough sleep – the brain “turns-off” during sleep and gives you a break from pain
  6. Stop smoking – smoking slows down blood flow to the tissues, slowing down the removal of toxins from the painful area
  7. Maintain a healthy diet – an anti-inflammatory, low sugar, diet may decrease inflammation pain

Outcomes

Under the care of your pain management doctor, chronic pain often improves, or may even disappear. Although chronic pain may return after an injury, such as a fall, it may also return in cycles that are not related to anything you do. Therefore, it is important to seek help early, from your pain doctor, in order to better control your pain and to regain the active lifestyle you deserve.

 Article Provided By: Advanced Medical Group

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Carpal Tunnel, Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Pain Management, Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Relief from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Does wrist or hand pain wake you up at night? Do you shake your wrist to stop the pain? Are you someone who types or holds the phone a lot? You may suffer from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome affects about 3 to 6 percent of American adults. It is often seen in people whose work or hobbies require repetitive motions of the wrist and hand. These include musicians, hair stylists, assembly line workers (especially those who operate vibrating tools), IT professionals and those who use keyboards.

The result can be burning, numbness or pain in the wrist and hand. This can ultimately lead to decreased gripping strength and coordination.

How does Carpal Tunnel Syndrome develop?

The median nerve runs the length of the arm and provides feeling to the palm side of the thumb and fingers (except for the pinky) This nerve and a series of tendons run through a narrow channel between the wrist bones called the carpal tunnel. If the tendons become irritated and swollen, the tunnel becomes smaller and the media nerve can get squeezed or pinched.

Those with smaller bone structures may be more susceptible to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. This is why the condition is seen more frequently in women than in men. Obesity is also a significant risk factor for developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Who is at risk of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

In addition to those whose work or hobbies require repetitive motions of the wrist and hand, some patients develop Carpal Tunnel Syndrome because of:

  • Heredity: Some people have smaller carpal tunnels or may have other anatomic structures that reduce the space for the median nerve. This is why women are more prone than men to develop the condition.
  • Pregnancy: Sometimes the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy can cause water retention. This may lead to swelling in the hand and wrist that can result in a flare-up of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
  • Chronic Disease or Illness: A number of chronic conditions, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid disease, can increase the risk of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. This is due to impacts to the nerve and the formation of bone spurs in and around the carpal tunnel bones.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms

  • Numbness, weakness or pain in the hand, including decreased grip strength.
  • A loss of strength and coordination, especially the ability to use your thumb to pinch.
  • Burning, tingling or itching of the index and middle fingers.
  • A sense of the hand “falling asleep” at night and awakening to a pins-and-needles sensation.
  • A worsening of symptoms as the day progresses, perhaps while engaged in activities like driving, holding a phone or reading a paper.

How Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is Diagnosed

First, your doctor will take your full medical history. Then he or she will examine your hands, arms, shoulders and neck, looking for signs of tenderness, swelling, warmth. He or she will then examine the median nerve and the carpal tunnel area and perform a series of specific clinical test maneuvers. These tests will determine pain patterns and check for strength, sensation and proper nerve function. Your doctor may:

  • Bend and hold your wrists in a flexed position to see if it results in numbness or tingling in your hands.
  • Tap over the median nerve in the carpal tunnel to recreate paresthesia.
  • Touch your fingertips and hands with a special instrument to see how much feeling you have in those extremities. Your eyes will be closed during this exercise.
  • Check for weakness in the muscles around the base of your thumb.

Imaging Tests to Diagnose Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Imaging tests may be ordered to look for things like a fracture, arthritis, a cyst or tumor.

  • Ultrasounds provide a look at the bones and tissues in your arm and wrist to detect signs of median nerve compression.
  • X-rays help your physician eliminate other potential causes of your pain, such as arthritis, ligament injury or a fracture.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the soft tissues in your arm and hand can assess whether abnormal tissue or damage to the median nerve itself (perhaps from injury or tumor) might be the cause of your pain.
  • Electrophysiological tests measure how well your median nerve is working and can determine if there is too much pressure on the nerve. These include nerve conduction studies that measure the signals that travel along the nerves of your hand and arm. The results provide a “road map” to determine the severity of your nerve impingement.
  • Electromyograms (EMG) measure the electrical activity in muscles to determine if you have suffered nerve or muscle damage.

Your doctor may also order lab tests to rule out underlying conditions, such as diabetes, hypothyroidism and rheumatoid arthritis.

Non-Surgical Treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Like most conditions, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is best treated early for greater success. Your physician will most likely begin treatment with conservative measures such as:

  • Splinting to stabilize movement in the wrist.
  • Lifestyle changes, including efforts to reduce or eliminate repetitive movements, or at least incorporating designated rest periods into the day. Improved posture and form can help, too.
  • Ice to reduce swelling.
  • Exercises to strengthen and stretch the tendons that may be causing the nerve irritation.
  • Reducing pain and discomfort with over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications.

If these efforts do not result in relief, your doctor may suggest prescription corticosteroid or lidocaine injections into the wrist to relieve pressure on the median nerve.

If these minimally invasive measures are unsuccessful, some patients may be candidates for regenerative injections to restore the normal chemical environment within the carpal tunnel and aid in nerve recovery.

Early treatment is key. Patients who ignore the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome risk severe muscle atrophy that may make a complete recovery impossible.

Article Provided By: Advanced Medical Group

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Peripheral Neuropathy, Peripheral, Pain Relief, CIPN, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5 Things To Know About Neuropathy

Neuropathy is a condition that occurs as a result of nerve damage. Peripheral neuropathy, or damage to the peripheral nerves, is one type of neuropathy and an often unexpected complication of cancer treatment. Here are five things you should know:

1. What does “peripheral neuropathy” really mean?
Peripheral nervous system is the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Your hands and feet (and the rest of your body) have nerves that tell you where your extremities are in relation to your body, help regulate temperature, and signal pain. When you touch something hot, your peripheral nerves signal your central nervous system and your hand quickly pulls away.

Your peripheral nerves act like messengers between your central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and the rest of your body. Peripheral neuropathy refers to the damage done to the peripheral nervous system, which disrupts the messengers’ ability to carry information from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. There are three different types of peripheral nerves that may be damaged by neuropathy: Sensory nerves, Motor nerves, and Autonomic nerves.

2. Who is affected?
Neuropathy is classified by types, which are named based on the specific nerves that are affected. Neuropathy, in general, affects about one to two percent of Americans. The most common type of neuropathy among cancer survivors is peripheral neuropathy.

It is estimated that 10–20 percent of cancer patients experience some form of peripheral neuropathy. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) is a possible side-effect of chemotherapy and affects about 30–40 percent of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Ask your health care team about the short and long-term effects of chemotherapy you have received. Specifically, cancer types associated with higher risk include: lung, breast, ovarian, myeloma, lymphoma and Hodgkin’s disease and testicular. Certain factors about the diagnosis and treatments may also heighten risk, such as tumor location, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and other cancer related disorders.

Other life factors and certain medication may also increase the risk of neuropathy, such as excessive use of alcohol and old age. Learn more about these factors here.

3. What are the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy?
Peripheral neuropathy can cause a tingling sensation or numbness in different parts of the body, but most commonly in the hands and feet. An individual’s personal experience of neuropathy depends on the types of peripheral nerves affected, the symptoms experienced from damage to those nerves, and the severity of those symptoms. Each person’s experience may vary.

4. So what if I’m diagnosed with neuropathy, what’s next?
Treatment and recovery times vary from case to case, but peripheral nerves can heal and recovery is possible. Depending on the cause of peripheral neuropathy and the type of nerve damage involved, a variety of different treatment options may be recommended by your health care team. These typically include:

  • Medication. Doctor prescribed medication doesn’t cure neuropathy but can help subside the pain and other side-effects.
  • Nutrition. Specific nutrients have proven to help manage neuropathy. Vitamin deficiencies can cause damage to nerve tissue, so it is important to maintain a healthy diet. A registered dietician can help you build a meal plan.
  • Physical or occupational therapy. Keeping muscles active and strong is beneficial to improving coordination and balance and reducing muscle cramps and pain. It can also help prevent injuries related to falls and loss of fine motor skills.
  • Integrative medicine. This treatment includes treatments such as massage and acupuncture to manage symptoms.

5. How can I be my own advocate?
Speak up about your symptoms to your health care team to get proper care. Educating yourself ensures you are best informed to make decisions about your treatment and will help you better communicate with your doctor, your family, and your friends about your needs.

You can take action to foster your own recovery and safety by:

  • Practicing appropriate pain relief. It is important to stay in control of your pain to maintain your quality of life. Ask your doctor for their recommendations on how to manage your pain.
  • Implementing as much movement and activity as appropriate into your routine.
  • Making sure your home is a safe environment to prevent possible tripping/falling. Examples include assuring proper lighting in hallways, using rugs for traction, and installing handrails. Find more safety tips for home here.

Surround yourself with ample support, information, and encouragement. Coping with peripheral neuropathy can be a long, difficult process, and it is important to know you are not alone. Share your feelings with friends, family, or a support group.

Article Provided By: LIVESTRONG

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Top Pain Management Techniques

Bodily pain that lasts more than 12 weeks is defined as chronic pain. This differs from recurring pain, wherein an individual suffers shorter bouts of pain on a consistent basis. Both chronic pain and recurring pain can be life-altering and have an adverse effect on mood, happiness, and general quality of life. While diagnosing and treating the underlying condition is a good step toward reducing pain, other pain management techniques may offer relief. From exercise to biofeedback, people should know there are options for managing their pain.

1. Cold and heat

Heat therapy and cold therapy are two of the best simple and inexpensive pain management options. Heat therapy involves applying heat to the affected area; this improves circulation and blood flow. Depending on the condition, dry heat, such as heating pads, or moist heat, such as a steamed towel, may prove more beneficial. Conversely, cold therapy reduces inflammation and swelling by reducing blood flow to the target area.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

2. Yoga

Yoga is an ancient physical, mental, and spiritual practice that combines mindfulness with breathing exercises and gentle motions. Gently raising the heart rate can release endorphins that help moderate pain, as does the increase in oxygen, which also enhances mood. Physically, stretching helps reduce pain held in the muscles and joints.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

3. Exercise

Gentle exercise such as taking a brisk walk, going for a swim, or riding a bicycle can ease pain. Exercising releases endorphins that elevate mood and block pain on a molecular level. These practices also strengthen the muscles, which reduces pain and prevents re-injury in the long run.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

4. Meditation

Meditation is a mindfulness activity that requires the individual to calm and center him or herself through deep breathing and focus. The practice can elevate mood, increase energy, and help ground oneself. Studies also show that meditation and deep breathing have a positive effect on pain. Meditation releases unconscious tension and tightness that are common sources of pain.

Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Relief, Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

5. Physical therapy

Regular sessions with a licensed physical therapist can greatly reduce pain. Physical therapists will aim to treat the pain as well as the underlying source. Physical therapy sessions consist of light aerobic exercise, stretching, and strength training. Therapists may also utilize tools such as heating pads, ice packs, and massage.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

6. Massage

While many people think of a massage as part of a trip to the spa, therapeutic massage can be a useful tool for pain management in addition to relaxation. Massage releases mental stress and eases muscle tension. Although massage typically targets neck and back pain, evidence suggests it is beneficial to all types of pain, and therapists are often well-versed in treating the whole body.

Peripheral Neuropathy, Back Pain Relief, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

7. Avoid alcohol and smoking

Pain often makes falling asleep and staying asleep difficult. A lack of sleep can contribute to pain, creating a vicious cycle. While alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep faster, it does nothing to improve the quality of your sleep, and you’ll often feel exhausted the next day; this is because alcohol blocks the deep, restorative REM sleep we need. Smoking worsens circulation, which can contribute to chronic pain.

Nerve Pain Therapy, Neuropathy Treatment, Neck Pain Relief, Diabetic Neuropathy Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

8. Occupational therapy

Different from physical therapy, occupational therapy involves learning and applying daily behaviors that will not aggravate the chronic pain. For example, if a person suffers from neck pain that makes it difficult to sit in front of a computer all day, an occupational therapist can suggest modifications and exercises to improve the situation. Occupational therapy is often used in conjunction with physical therapy to get the best results.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

9. Acupuncture

Acupuncture is the ancient practice of stimulating pressure points on the body to achieve specific results. While scientific inquiry into the health benefits of acupuncture is ongoing, much of the evidence suggests acupuncture is an efficient way to treat pain. Acupuncture works by activating the body’s self-healing mechanisms and can be useful in treating lower back pain, neck pain, knee pain, and osteoarthritis. It may also help with chronic migraines.

Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Relief, Chemotherapy, Peripheral, CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10. Biofeedback

Biofeedback is a therapy that helps control the body’s involuntary responses to pain. Electrodes take various readings such as heart and breathing rate, blood pressure, and skin temperature. The biofeedback therapist then takes the patient through relaxation exercises that help regulate these functions and ultimately positively affect pain.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Article Provided By: FactyHealth

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Pressure on the median nerve – the central nerve that connects to the hand – causes carpal tunnel syndrome. In carpal tunnel patients, it causes pain and lack of function in the hand when squeezed. People whose work requires repetitive hand movements often experience this disorder. For example, people who work on computers and hair stylists commonly experience carpal tunnel syndrome. Pregnant women are also highly susceptible. A wrist splint or exercises can ease symptoms in the early days, however, in advanced cases surgery is necessary.

1. Pins and Needles

Everyone recognizes the tingling sensation known as pins and needles. This easily happens to someone who stays in an awkward position without moving hands and legs over a period. In these cases, the feeling is no more than a slight irritant, but with carpal tunnel syndrome, the sensation is far more intense and unpleasant. Usually, it only affects the thumb and fingers, but it can also spread to other areas.

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2. Pain

Even in the early stages, carpal tunnel syndrome can be extremely painful. The pain is usually in the hands and fingers, however, in severe cases it may travel through the arm to the shoulder. Pain patterns vary from patient to patient. Doctors are continuously researching to understand more about carpal tunnel syndrome.

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3. Numbness in the fingertips

Carpal tunnel syndrome may cause loss of feeling in the fingers. The fingers may feel very little to no sensation at all. As a result, patients may be unable to complete normal day to day tasks. Surgical treatment is usually necessary to restore sensation and function. However, exercise and home treatment may be enough in some cases.

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4. Sensation of swelling

Quite regularly people with carpal tunnel syndrome feel as though their hands or fingers have become swollen. When the doctor checks them, they find no evidence of swelling, but patients continue to feel that sensation. Minor swelling may occur above the wrist at times in carpal tunnel syndrome. However, most patients report the feeling in the fingers, localized to where the numbness occurs.

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5. Hands feel weak

One of the most common carpal tunnel syndrome feelings is a sense of hands that have lost their power. In particular, people claim that they find it harder to grip small objects and this causes many breakages in the kitchen. Medical tests do not reveal any marked loss of hand power in these cases, so doctors remain uncertain why so many patients feel this way. However, some slight deterioration in grip control may happen after surgical treatment.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

6. Responds to changes in wrist movements

People with carpal tunnel syndrome often find that they can get relief by moving their hand into a different position. Symptoms are usually worse at night – presumably because of fewer hand movements. In the most severe cases, the symptoms might be so intense that they disturb sleep and cause night waking.

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7. A condition that worsens over time

Carpel tunnel syndrome worsens with time, especially if symptoms go ignored and untreated. Surgery is usually necessary for the later stages of the condition. Early detection is best, as treatment is quite simple in the early stages. Wrist splints and exercise are usually enough to relieve symptoms in the early stages.

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8. Skin color changes

A certain number of people might notice changes in the color of the skin of their hand as a consequence of this condition. Sometimes the skin could become dry. Tingling and numbness feelings in their hand is also a good indication that they might have carpal tunnel syndrome. This is especially likely to be the case if they also feel that their fingertips have become frigid.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

9. Stiffness of the fingers

Some carpal tunnel syndrome patients complain that they feel as though their fingers are very stiff. However, when the doctor examines them, they fail to find any evidence to support this feeling. If the patient’s fingers actually have become stiff, it’s likely they are experiencing rheumatic or arthritic condition.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10. Like the twang of a rubber band

One of the strangest feelings associated with carpal tunnel syndrome is in response to a certain hand movement. People say they sense something comparable to the twang of a released rubber band in their hand and fingers. Nobody is sure what exactly causes them to have this feeling. In particular, patients report this happening after they have had surgery performed.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Article Provided By: FactyHealth

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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Peripheral Neuropathy and Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar and diabetes. It leads to numbness, loss of sensation, and sometimes pain in your feet, legs, or hands. It is the most common complication of diabetes.

About 60% to 70% of all people with diabetes will eventually develop peripheral neuropathy, although not all suffer pain. Yet this nerve damage is not inevitable. Studies have shown that people with diabetes can reduce their risk of developing nerve damage by keeping their blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible.

What causes peripheral neuropathy? Chronically high blood sugar levels damage nerves not only in your extremities but also in other parts of your body. These damaged nerves cannot effectively carry messages between the brain and other parts of the body.

This means you may not feel heat, cold, or pain in your feet, legs, or hands. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, you may not know it, which is why it’s so important to inspect your feet daily. If a shoe doesn’t fit properly, you could even develop a foot ulcer and not know it.

The consequences can be life-threatening. An infection that won’t heal because of poor blood flow causes risk for developing ulcers and can lead to amputation, even death.

This nerve damage shows itself differently in each person. Some people feel tingling, then later feel pain. Other people lose the feeling in fingers and toes; they have numbness. These changes happen slowly over a period of years, so you might not even notice it.

Because the changes are subtle and happen as people get older, people tend to ignore the signs of nerve damage, thinking it’s just part of getting older.

But there are treatments that can help slow the progression of this condition and limit the damage. Talk to your doctors about what your options are, and don’t ignore the signs because with time, it can get worse.

Symptoms of Nerve Damage From Diabetes

Numbness is the most common, troubling symptom of nerve damage due to diabetes. The loss of sensation is a special concern. People who lose sensation are the ones most likely to get ulcers on their feet and to end up needing amputations.

People describe the early symptoms of peripheral neuropathy in many ways:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Pins and needles
  • Prickling
  • Burning
  • Cold
  • Pinching
  • Buzzing
  • Sharp
  • Deep stabs

Others describe sharp pain, cramps, tingling, prickling, a burning sensation. Still others have exaggerated sensitivity to touch.

The symptoms are often worse at night. Be on the look out for these changes in how you feel:

  • Touch sensitivity. You may experience heightened sensitivity to touch, or a tingling or numbness in your toes, feet, legs, or hands.
  • Muscle weakness. Chronically elevated blood sugars can also damage nerves that tell muscles how to move. This can lead to muscle weakness. You may have difficulty walking or getting up from a chair. You may have difficulty grabbing things or carrying things with your hands.
  • Balance problems. You may feel more unsteady than usual and uncoordinated when you walk. This occurs when the body adapts to changes brought on by muscle damage.

Because people with type 2 diabetes may have multiple health problems, doctors don’t always diagnose peripheral neuropathy when symptoms first appear. You need to be aware that your pain may be confused with other problems.

Make sure your pain is taken seriously.

Article Provided By: WebMD

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How to Sleep Well Despite Chronic Pain

Chronic pain and insomnia are an unhealthy combination. According to the National Sleep Foundation, chronic pain disturbs the slumber of one in five Americans at least a few nights a week. Whether it’s from a bad back, arthritis, or headaches, chronic pain puts you in double jeopardy: the pain robs you of restful sleep and makes you more fatigued, and thus more sensitive to pain.

But you can start to break this vicious cycle.

“For chronic pain conditions, what you need is good sleeping habits from the beginning — things that will last,” says Dr. Padma Gulur, a pain medicine specialist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. That means relying on the brain’s natural sleep drive as much as possible.

Try “relaxing distraction”

Dr. Gulur recommends “relaxing distraction” to her patients. Some relaxation techniques use basic rhythmic breathing meditation; others focus on guided imagery, in which you imagine being in a calm, peaceful location. Find something that appeals to you and helps you fall asleep. You might look for these exercises on CD, or consider group or individual trainings or sleep education sessions.

Getting back to sleep

For some people, chronic pain not only makes it harder to fall asleep, but can also interrupt sleep. Simply shifting position in bed can trigger pain from a back condition or arthritic knee.

One approach is to take your pain medication right before bed. Check with your doctor to be sure that fits into your treatment plan. If pain does wake you in the middle of the night, first try meditation, visualization, or whatever relaxing distraction you favor. But if it doesn’t work, getting up to read a book in a quiet room with low light can help you to get back to sleep. Avoid loud sounds and bright light (that means TVs, smartphones, tablets, and computers).

Staying on a regular sleep schedule is also important. Go to bed at the same time every night and, no matter how the night goes, rise the next day at the same time and remain awake until your planned sleep time. This helps to set your internal sleep clock and enhances the natural sleep drive.

Article Provided By: Harvard Health Publishing

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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