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Exercises for Peripheral Neuropathy

Exercises for Peripheral Neuropathy

Alternative treatments for peripheral neuropathy
About 20 million people across the country live with a form of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage disorder that typically causes pain in your hands and feet. Other common symptoms of this disorder include:
muscle weakness
numbness
tingling
poor balance
inability to feel pain or temperature
Treatment options typically focus on pain relief and treating the underlying cause. However, studies show that exercise can effectively preserve nerve function and promote nerve regeneration.
Exercise techniques for peripheral neuropathy
There are three main types of exercises ideal for people with peripheral neuropathy: aerobic, balance, and stretching.
Before you start exercises, warm up your muscles with dynamic stretching like arm circles. This promotes flexibility and increases blood flow. It will boost your energy, too, and activate your nerve signals.
Aerobic exercises
Aerobic exercises move large muscles and cause you to breathe deeply. This increases blood flow and releases endorphins that act as the body’s natural painkillers.
Best practices for aerobic exercising include routine activity for about 30 minutes a day, at least three days a week. If you’re just starting out, try exercising for 10 minutes a day to start.
Some examples of aerobic exercises are:
brisk walking
swimming
bicycling
Balance training
Peripheral neuropathy can leave your muscles and joints feeling stiff and sometimes weak. Balance training can build your strength and reduce feelings of tightness. Improved balance also prevents falls.
Beginning balance training exercises include leg and calf raises.
Side leg raise
Using a chair or counter, steady your balance with one hand.
Stand straight with feet slightly apart.
Slowly lift one leg to the side and hold for 5–10 seconds.
Lower your leg at the same pace.
Repeat with the other leg.
As you improve balance, try this exercise without holding onto the counter.
Calf raise
Using a chair or counter, steady your balance.
Lift the heels of both feet off the ground so you’re standing on your toes.
Slowly lower yourself down.
Repeat for 10–15 reps.
Stretching exercises
Stretching increases your flexibility and warms up your body for other physical activity. Routine stretching can also reduce your risk of developing an injury while exercising. Common techniques are calf stretches and seated hamstring stretches.
Calf stretch
Place one leg behind you with your toe pointing forward.
Take a step forward with the opposite foot and slightly bend the knee.
Lean forward with the front leg while keeping the heel on your back leg planted on the floor.
Hold this stretch for 15 seconds.
Repeat three times per leg.
Seated hamstring stretch
Sit on the edge of a chair.
Extend one leg in front of you with your toe pointed upward.
Bend the opposite knee with your foot flat on the floor.
Position your chest over your straight leg, and straighten your back until you feel a muscle stretch.
Hold this position for 15 – 20 seconds.
Repeat three times per leg.

Outlook
Exercise can reduce pain symptoms from peripheral neuropathy. Be sure to stretch after any workout to increase your flexibility and reduce pain from muscle tightness.
Mild pain is normal after stretching and regular activity. However, if your pain worsens or if you develop joint swelling, visit your doctor.

Article Provided By: healthline
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

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Hyperalgesia

Hyperalgesia: It Hurts Everywhere!!

Christina Lasich, MD
Health Professional
March 2, 2013

Imagine if a paper cut felt like a red, hot poker stabbed you. Imagine if a small bruise felt like a sledge hammer hit you. If you are able to imagine these examples or maybe have even felt this way, then you know what it is like to have hyperalgesia. This term means that the tissue involved has an increased sensitivity to painful stimuli. The small hurts hurt even worse. The minor injuries feel ten times worse. And it seems to hurt everywhere.

Where does hyperalgesia come from? And why does it happen? Increased sensitivity to pain can occur in damaged or undamaged tissue. Remember, pain does not necessarily mean that something is damaged. But pain does mean that the brain is interpreting signals from the body that seem threatening. Sometimes those signals are amplified because of the superactivation of the pain pathways. And sometimes those signals are amplified because of the suppression natural pain-relieving pathways in the body. Whether you have over-activity of pain pathways or suppression of pain-relieving pathways or both, all these roads can lead to an increased sensitivity to pain.

A classic example of hyperalgesia is felt when someone is experiencing opioid withdrawals. The sudden discontinuation of pain medications leaves a person with a non-functioning natural-pain relieving system while at the same time, the pain pathways deep within the nervous system become extremely active. This perfect storm of hyperalgesia causes a person to feel achy and sensitive everywhere. (1)

 

Another example of an increased sensitivity to pain is getting more and more notoriety because of the overuse of short-acting opioid medications for the treatment of chronic pain. This condition is called opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Pain medication can cause more pain if the user is experiencing a frequent cycle of withdrawals. As already mentioned, opioid withdrawals are well known to cause hyperalgesia. Furthermore, the frequent cycle of withdrawals sensitizes the nervous system. (2)

Nervous system sensitization is probably the most common reason for someone to experience an increased sensitivity to pain. Common conditions like fibromyalgia, headaches and sciatica are all conditions that typically have a component of hyperalgesia associated with that experience. Furthermore, each of those conditions is also related to a nervous system that has been altered in some way to be overactive and wound-up. The nervous system is your alarm system. When your alarm system overreacts to painful stimuli, all the little hurts feel HUGE.

And that might be the reason why you hurt everywhere. Hyperalgesia is not only an increased sensitivity to pain; it is also an indicator that someone’s alarm system might be dysfunctional because of the sudden withdrawal of medications, the overuse of medications or the sensitization of the nervous system. The hyperalgesia process can be reversed. It’s a matter of resetting the alarm. Allowing the body’s natural pain-relieving system to turn back on, eliminating the frequent cycles of withdrawals and desensitizing the nervous system are all ways to treat the increased sensitivity to pain. Unfortunately, resetting your alarm system is easier said than done.

Pain. 2013 Jan 11. pii: S0304-3959(13)00011-0

Cephalalgia. 2013 Jan;33(1):52-64

 

Article Provided By: Healthcentral

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

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Neuopathy Flares

What Makes Neuropathy Flare up? Here Are 4 Common Causes and The Top 3 Solutions
Last Updated on April 16, 2019

Neuropathy can make life far more difficult than it has to be. Of course, there will always be some struggle when it comes managing the pain and the uncomfortable feelings that come with the condition.

For the most part, treatment is straightforward: manage the symptoms that are able to be managed and find ways to cope with the ones that aren’t.
Sadly, there are times when neuropathy can flare up, making management significantly more troublesome.
Being able to understand why neuropathy is flaring up is one of the first steps to preparing, coping, and managing with the condition.
Sometimes, they are even caused by things that are relatively easy to change and fix, meaning that there are some ways that a person can make it easier to deal with neuropathy.
What Causes Neuropathy To Get Worse?
Because neuropathy is a disease that focuses on the nerves of the body, nearly anything can make it flare up. Flare ups are generally classified as an intensifying of the chronic pain that a person is used to, although it often goes back down to its typical level given time.
As neuropathy is a disease concerned with the nerves, anything that affects the nerves can cause a flare up. This can range from the food that a person eats in a day, to the temperature outside, to the way that person lives his or her life. There are many things that can cause a flare up but many of these things are somewhat preventable.
The things that a person physically cannot change, such as the temperature outside, are things that the person can remedy in other ways. This means that once a person knows what common triggers are, it will be easier to avoid them in the future, leading to an easier and more comfortable life.

The Wrong Foods
The food that a person intakes plays a significant role in neuropathy symptoms. As many people have come to learn, the kinds of foods that can affect it are generally grains, sugars, gluten, and fat. In particular, refined grains have a high glycemic content in them.
This will greatly affect a person’s blood sugar. Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common forms of neuropathy, meaning that it is crucial that a person keeps his or her blood sugar at an appropriate level whether or not he or she is diabetic.
If a person eats a lot of refined grains, it is best to replace them with whole grains to prevent this issue with blood sugar.

Likewise, sugar directly correlates to a person’s blood sugar levels. Added sugars are even worse as they are only there for flavor and nothing more.
Especially if a person is diabetic, it is best to avoid foods with added sugar. Too much sugar can cause a flare up as it will cause the blood sugar to fluctuate.
This is one of the most common triggers, especially in people who have diabetic neuropathy. Nutritional deficiencies caused by relying too much on the flavor that added sugars provide can not only worsen neuropathy but they can also cause symptoms in someone who does not have it.
If a person has a gluten allergy, it is common sense that he or she stays away from food with gluten. Managing neuropathy symptoms is all the more reason to stay away from gluten. If a person’s body cannot process gluten, then it can severely worsen the symptoms of neuropathy, causing a flare up. This means that these people should search for gluten-free products to avoid these symptoms.
Lastly, saturated fats can cause inflammation, which is definitely a trigger for a neuropathy flare up. If a person does not already have type 2 diabetes, too much saturated fat can put this person on the road to developing diabetes.
To prevent this, the best thing that a person can do is find foods that don’t have a lot of saturated fats in them. Ultimately, the best thing that a person can do to alter any food-related triggers for neuropathy is to avoid sugars, refined grains, gluten, and saturated fat. This will take care of some of the triggers for flare ups.
Poor Physical Health
Since neuropathy is focused on the nerves in the body, the physical health of a person’s body will of course play a big role in how often neuropathy flare ups happen. Some major triggers for a flare up could be smoking, injuries, and illnesses. For instance, it is a well-known fact that smoking is very bad for the human body.

Smoking is one of the many triggers, because smoking constricts the blood vessels in the body, which constricts the blood that goes to the extremities.
This can quickly and easily worsen the symptoms of neuropathy, ultimately resulting in a flare up that nobody wants to deal with.
In addition to this, it should be relatively obvious that injuries to the body can cause a flare up as they can open many nerve endings to more pain that a person typically experiences.
On the chance that a person’s extremities have become so numb that the person is not aware of an injury, it is imperative that this person regularly checks to ensure that there are no injuries on the feet or hands. An injury can put a lot of physical stress on the body, which can lead to a neuropathic nightmare.
As the health of a person’s body plays a large role in whether or not the person is nearing a flare up, another thing that is important to pay attention to is health. Being sick puts quite a bit of stress on the body and thus the nerves. The stress on the nerves can translate into a neuropathic flare up, which can only make dealing with the sickness even worse.
In some cases, underlying issues can even be the cause of the neuropathy in the first place. If a person has any reason to suspect being sick, it would be a good idea to visit the doctor. Besides visiting the doctor, a person should take the appropriate measures to stay as healthy as possible both physically and mentally, to avoid worsening conditions.
Poor Mental and Emotional Health
Just as physical stress plays an enormous role in whether or not a person’s body is at risk for a flare up, mental stress and temperature also play a role. Emotional stress, while people might not think about it much, can be extremely hard on the nerves. This can make emotional stress a trigger for a neuropathic flare up.

One of the ways that a person could alleviate and remove this trigger is to make sure that there isn’t really anything stressful going on.
If there is something stressful, measures should be taken to remove that stressor, whether that means taking care of a particular task or ignoring some people for a period of time.

The temperature of a room or location also plays into the idea of triggers both emotional and physical.
After all, temperature is signaled to the brain through the nerves. Depending on the type of neuropathy a person has, temperature can quickly become a trigger for a flare up.
Typically, cooler temperatures are better, although the change should be gradual so as not to jolt the nerves too much. Cooler temperatures are best as they cause a slower heart rate and slow blood flow a little bit, slightly numbing any pain that a person might be feeling.

Contradicting Medications

Anything that is ingested into the body is going to affect the health of nerves and this especially goes for medication.
Medication can bring about worse side effects that can trigger a neuropathic flare up that nobody wants to deal with.
This can be difficult to deal with as finding the medication that is causing the flare up can be tough. Sometimes, that medication is something that a person needs.
When this happens, it might be worth talking to a doctor about alternatives to reduce the chances that a person’s own medication is causing symptoms to get worse.
How Can They Be Prevented?
Out of the many things that cause flare ups, there are several that can easily be changed. With time, diet and nutrition can change to a more suitable situation for a person’s needs. Stress will come and go with time and managing that stress will be important in regulating flare ups.
Know Your Triggers
Making sure that a person knows what his or her triggers are is essential in preventing flare ups from happening. This means that one of the best things a person can do is keep track of what came before a flare up so that he or she can get a good idea of what triggers neuropathic flare ups. Once the person understands what causes the flare ups, the hard work is halfway done.
Optimize Your Lifestyle
All that needs to be done now is changes in lifestyle to create a life where a person doesn’t have to worry nearly as much about triggering a neuropathic flare up. By having a journal that logs what triggers are and what can be done to avoid them, a person can begin taking the steps needed to live a life without neuropathic flare ups.
Take Supplements
Nutritional supplementation is a safe, low cost way to provide your nerves with the right herbs, vitamins, and nutrition they need for proper functioning. Many people are deficient in key vitamins like thiamine and methyl b12 due to lower nutrient density in today’s foods. People can either take multiple nerve health supplements individually or use a pre-formulated solution like Nerve Renew, which consists of proven ingredients in the optimal dosages according to clinical studies.

Article Provided By: Nerve Pain Guide

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

Chemotherapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain Therapy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Peripheral Neuropathy and Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar and diabetes. It leads to numbness, loss of sensation, and sometimes pain in your feet, legs, or hands. It is the most common complication of diabetes.

About 60% to 70% of all people with diabetes will eventually develop peripheral neuropathy, although not all suffer pain. Yet this nerve damage is not inevitable. Studies have shown that people with diabetes can reduce their risk of developing nerve damage by keeping their blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible.

What causes peripheral neuropathy? Chronically high blood sugar levels damage nerves not only in your extremities but also in other parts of your body. These damaged nerves cannot effectively carry messages between the brain and other parts of the body.

This means you may not feel heat, cold, or pain in your feet, legs, or hands. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, you may not know it, which is why it’s so important to inspect your feet daily. If a shoe doesn’t fit properly, you could even develop a foot ulcer and not know it.

The consequences can be life-threatening. An infection that won’t heal because of poor blood flow causes risk for developing ulcers and can lead to amputation, even death.

This nerve damage shows itself differently in each person. Some people feel tingling, then later feel pain. Other people lose the feeling in fingers and toes; they have numbness. These changes happen slowly over a period of years, so you might not even notice it.

Because the changes are subtle and happen as people get older, people tend to ignore the signs of nerve damage, thinking it’s just part of getting older.

But there are treatments that can help slow the progression of this condition and limit the damage. Talk to your doctors about what your options are, and don’t ignore the signs because with time, it can get worse.

Symptoms of Nerve Damage From Diabetes

Numbness is the most common, troubling symptom of nerve damage due to diabetes. The loss of sensation is a special concern. People who lose sensation are the ones most likely to get ulcers on their feet and to end up needing amputations.

People describe the early symptoms of peripheral neuropathy in many ways:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Pins and needles
  • Prickling
  • Burning
  • Cold
  • Pinching
  • Buzzing
  • Sharp
  • Deep stabs

Others describe sharp pain, cramps, tingling, prickling, a burning sensation. Still others have exaggerated sensitivity to touch.

The symptoms are often worse at night. Be on the look out for these changes in how you feel:

  • Touch sensitivity. You may experience heightened sensitivity to touch, or a tingling or numbness in your toes, feet, legs, or hands.
  • Muscle weakness. Chronically elevated blood sugars can also damage nerves that tell muscles how to move. This can lead to muscle weakness. You may have difficulty walking or getting up from a chair. You may have difficulty grabbing things or carrying things with your hands.
  • Balance problems. You may feel more unsteady than usual and uncoordinated when you walk. This occurs when the body adapts to changes brought on by muscle damage.

Because people with type 2 diabetes may have multiple health problems, doctors don’t always diagnose peripheral neuropathy when symptoms first appear. You need to be aware that your pain may be confused with other problems.

Make sure your pain is taken seriously.

Article Provided By: WebMD

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Neuropathy Treatment, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Pheripheral Neuropathy

When It Hurts to Be Touched

Our sense of touch is a fundamental part of the human experience. Being touched by others a powerful tool of communication, whether it is through a handshake, a hug, or a pat on the back, and it can also boost a sense of general well-being.Unfortunately, living with chronic pain can interfere with your ability to touch, feel, hold, or be held by others. One of the most challenging examples of this occurs when we develop extreme sensitivities to touch from things that aren’t usually painful. The medical term for this is allodynia, and it means that something is painful from a non-painful stimulus. Imagine lightly brushing the back of your hand with a cotton ball. That should not hurt in the least, but now suppose doing so is all of a sudden associated with the feeling of intense pain in the hand.This type of extreme sensitivity to touch can have a dramatic effect on a person’s life. They may completely avoid using an affected body part, like a hand in our example, or they may avoid even leaving the house out of fear that being around others may risk contact with the sensitive body part.One of the most common types of pain that can lead to something like allodynia is nerve pain, also known as neuropathic pain. One nerve pain syndrome, in particular, that is often associated with cantankerous forms of allodynia is complex regional pain syndrome, or CRPS. CRPS can be a debilitating pain problem that usually involves an extremity, like an arm or leg, after some type of tissue injury has taken place.Allodynia can be associated with other types of chronic pain problems, as well, including fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, TMJ, painful surgical scars, and skin damage from ultraviolet radiation. In fact, migraine sufferers have been reported to have pain with hair combing, shaving, and putting in contact lenses.Researchers believe that allodynia is a result of the amplification of pain signals going on in the brain – a problem called “central sensitization” – though it is still unclear what causes it.

Fortunately, allodynia can be successfully treated under the right circumstances, so it is important to find health care providers who understand this problem and can help. Desensitization techniques are one way of reducing the hypersensitivity of the skin or tissues, and you can even learn how to do some of this at home on your own. For example, placing a sensitive hand or foot into a bowl of uncooked rice or lentils is one tool we use with some of our patients. Other topical treatments include things like contrast baths, paraffin wax, and clay. Because desensitization can be a painful process to start, it helps to have as much support and guidance from your treatment team as you can get.So, if you are struggling with hypersensitivities and it is interfering with your quality of life, ask your health care team for help.
Article Provided By: WebMD
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment
process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com