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Everything You Should Know About Allodynia

Everything You Should Know About Allodynia

What is allodynia?
Allodynia is an unusual symptom that can result from several nerve-related conditions. When you’re experiencing it, you feel pain from stimuli that don’t normally cause pain. For example, lightly touching your skin or brushing your hair might feel painful.
To ease allodynia, your doctor will try to treat the underlying cause.
What are the symptoms of allodynia?
The main symptom of allodynia is pain from stimuli that don’t usually cause pain. In some cases, you might find hot or cold temperatures painful. You might find gentle pressure on your skin painful. You might feel pain in response to a brushing sensation or other movement along your skin or hair.
Depending on the underlying cause of your allodynia, you might experience other symptoms too.
For example, if it’s caused by fibromyalgia, you might also experience:
anxiety
depression
trouble concentrating
trouble sleeping
fatigue
If it’s linked to migraines, you might also experience:
painful headaches
increased sensitivity to light or sounds
changes in your vision
nausea
What causes allodynia?
Some underlying conditions can cause allodynia. It’s most commonly linked to fibromyalgia and migraine headaches. Postherpetic neuralgia or peripheral neuropathy can also cause it.
Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia is a disorder in which you feel muscle and joint pain throughout your body. But it’s not related to an injury or a condition such as arthritis. Instead, it seems to be linked to the way your brain processes pain signals from your body. It’s still something of a medical mystery. Scientists don’t quite understand its roots, but it tends to run in families. Certain viruses, stress, or trauma might also trigger fibromyalgia.
Migraine headaches
Migraine is a type of headache that causes intense pain. Changes in nerve signals and chemical activity in your brain trigger this type of headache. In some cases, these changes can cause allodynia.
Peripheral neuropathy
Peripheral neuropathy happens when the nerves that connect your body to your spinal cord and brain become damaged or destroyed. It can result from several serious medical conditions. For example, it’s a potential complication of diabetes.
Postherpetic neuralgia
Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of shingles. This is a disease caused by the varicella zoster virus, which also causes chicken pox. It can damage your nerves and lead to postherpetic neuralgia. Heightened sensitivity to touch is a potential symptom of postherpetic neuralgia.

 

What are the risk factors for allodynia?
If you have a parent who has fibromyalgia, you’re at higher risk of developing it and allodynia. Experiencing migraines, developing peripheral neuropathy, or getting shingles or chickenpox also raises your risk of developing allodynia.

How is allodynia diagnosed?
If you notice your skin has become more sensitive to touch than normal, you can start to diagnose yourself. You can do this by testing your nerve sensitivity. For example, try brushing a dry cotton pad on your skin. Next, apply a hot or cold compress on your skin. If you experience a painful tingling feeling in response to any of these stimuli, you might have allodynia. Make an appointment with your doctor to get a formal diagnosis.
Your doctor may conduct a variety of tests to assess your nerve sensitivity. They will also ask about your medical history and other symptoms that you might have. This can help them start to identify the cause of your allodynia. Be sure to answer their questions as honestly and completely as possible. Tell them about any pain in your extremities, headaches, poor wound healing, or other changes that you’ve noticed.
If they suspect you might have diabetes, your doctor will likely order blood tests to measure the level of glucose in your bloodstream. They might also order blood tests to check for other possible causes of your symptoms, such as thyroid disease or infection.

How is allodynia treated?
Depending on the underlying cause of your allodynia, your doctor might recommend medications, lifestyle changes, or other treatments.
For example, your doctor might prescribe medications such as lidocaine (Xylocaine) or pregabalin (Lyrica) to help ease your pain. They might also recommend taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as naproxen (Alleve). In some cases, your doctor might recommend treatment with electrical stimulation, hypnotherapy, or other complementary approaches.
It’s also important for your doctor to address the underlying condition that’s causing your allodynia. For instance, successful diabetes treatment can help improve diabetic neuropathy. This can help lower your risk of allodynia.
Lifestyle changes
Identifying triggers that make your allodynia worse can help you manage your condition.
If you experience migraine headaches, certain foods, beverages, or environments might trigger your symptoms. Consider using a journal to track your lifestyle habits and symptoms. Once you’ve identified your triggers, take steps to limit your exposure to them.
Managing stress is also important if you’re living with migraine headaches or fibromyalgia. Stress can bring on symptoms in both of these conditions. Practicing meditation or other relaxation techniques might help you reduce your stress levels.
Wearing clothes made of light fabrics and going sleeveless may also help, if your allodynia is triggered by the touch of clothing.
Social and emotional support
If treatment doesn’t relieve your pain, ask your doctor about mental health counseling. These services might help you learn to adjust to your changing physical health. For example, cognitive behavior therapy can help you change how you think about and react to difficult situations.
It might also help to seek the advice of other people with allodynia. For example, look for support groups in your community or online. In addition to sharing strategies to manage your symptoms, it might help to connect with others who understand your pain.

Article Provided By: healthline
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

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Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Scrambler Therapy For Chemotherapy Neuropathy

Clinical Trial
Support Care Cancer
. 2020 Mar;28(3):1183-1197. doi: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3. Epub 2019 Jun 17.
Scrambler therapy for chemotherapy neuropathy: a randomized phase II pilot trial
Charles Loprinzi 1 , Jennifer G Le-Rademacher 2 , Neil Majithia 2 , Ryan P McMurray 2 , Carrie R O’Neill 2 , Markus A Bendel 2 , Andreas Beutler 2 , Daniel H Lachance 2 , Andrea Cheville 2 , David M Strick 2 , David F Black 2 , Jon C Tilburt 2 , Thomas J Smith 2
Affiliations Expand
PMID: 31209630 DOI: 10.1007/s00520-019-04881-3
Abstract
Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a prominent clinical problem, with limited effective therapies. Preliminary non-randomized clinical trial data support that Scrambler Therapy is helpful in this situation.
Methods: Patients were eligible if they had CIPN symptoms for at least 3 months and CIPN-related tingling or pain at least 4/10 in severity during the week prior to registration. They were randomized to receive Scrambler Therapy versus transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for 2 weeks. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) were utilized to measure efficacy and toxicity daily for 2 weeks during therapy and then weekly for 8 additional weeks.
Results: This study accrued 50 patients, 25 to each of the 2 study arms; 46 patients were evaluable. There were twice as many Scrambler-treated patients who had at least a 50% documented improvement during the 2 treatment weeks, from their baseline pain, tingling, and numbness scores, when compared with the TENS-treated patients (from 36 to 56% compared with 16-28% for each symptom). Global Impression of Change scores for “neuropathy symptoms,” pain, and quality of life were similarly improved during the treatment weeks. Patients in the Scrambler group were more likely than those in the TENS group to recommend their treatment to other patients, during both the 2-week treatment period and the 8-week follow-up period (p < 0.0001). Minimal toxicity was observed.
Conclusions: The results from this pilot trial were positive, supporting the conduct of further investigations regarding the use of Scrambler Therapy for treating CIPN.
Keywords: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy; Scrambler; TENS.

Article Provided By: pubmed
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

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Holiday Self Care

Holiday Self Care

Don’t Take a Vacation from Holiday Self Care!
The holiday season can be a stressful time for anyone, whether it’s the positive stress of gathering with loved ones or a more negative experience due to personal hardships. Of course, most of us have a mixed experience of both positive and negative stressors during the holidays.
When you are suffering from the discomfort or pain, holiday stress can take an even bigger toll—not just emotional but physical. You’re likely to be feeling more fatigue or a chronic pain flare-up during this time.
It may seem that self care is just another stressor during the holidays. Sticking to your at-home treatment protocol of a healthy diet, nutritional supplements, light exercise, and mindfulness practice may seem like an imposition or even just another thing on your rapidly growing to-do list!
But the truth is, the most positive step you can take to reduce neuropathy symptoms during the holidays is to prioritize your neuropathy self care above all else.
If you’ve already fallen off the wagon in terms of your neuropathy self care plan, then it’s important to realize that you don’t have to wait for a New Year’s resolution to get back on. You can start right now.
And if that feels too overwhelming, then remember that you can add in healthy habits just one at a time. Every small improvement will have a cumulative effect on your well-being and help reduce neuropathy symptoms.
Here are a few key elements of your at-home care to reduce pain, discomfort and often neuropathy symptoms and holiday stress:
A diet focused on plants & vegetables, with fewer simple carbs, sugars and unhealthy fats
Good hydration with plenty of water
Exercise as prescribed by your medical team, possibly including stretching, yoga, or other low-impact activities
Relaxation exercises or meditation
Above all, try to maintain focus on the joys and pleasures of the holiday season and let go of any preconceptions about how things should go.

 

Article Provided By: neuropathydr
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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Chronic Pain During the Holidays

Chronic Pain During the Holidays
No matter what holiday you celebrate, this time of year can be a lot. There are elaborate dinners to prepare, parties to host and attend, presents to find, decorations to hang, families to visit, traditions to respect, and very little time for self-care. But your body doesn’t know that, and chronic pain is, if anything, exacerbated by stress and busy schedules.
Here are some tips to help you survive the holidays, pain or no pain:
1. BE REALISTIC
Tempering the holiday madness may not sound like much fun, but if you start off with unrealistic expectations, then no matter how hard you try, you’ll never quite manage. If your physical ability is less than it was last year, adjust your schedule and chores accordingly. Don’t take on more than you know you can manage – that’s just setting yourself up for failure. Consider what’s practical, and use that as your starting point for all your holiday plans.
2. SHARE THE LOAD
A lot of people try to do it all themselves, but the holidays are meant to be a family affair! So don’t be afraid to share the workload. For parties, consider going potluck. For the main event, share cooking responsibilities by assigning someone to each dish. This ensures that even if you have a bad day, there will still be a good meal for everyone. Ask others to help you decorate, ask the kids to pitch in, or pay the neighbor’s kid to shovel your porch. You do not have to do everything yourself.
3. SHOP ONLINE
Online shopping is a godsend, especially for those who struggle to fight their way around malls at this busy time of year. And it’s not just for gifts. You can order groceries, alcohol, decorations, and even cards online. This helps streamline your chores and minimizes energy spent.
4. PLAN FOR DOWNTIME
When everything feels like a rush, it can be hard to shoehorn in time for yourself. So don’t rely on doing this in the moment – plan for it. Deliberately set aside some time each day to rest and recuperate. Avoid scheduling multiple energy-intensive activities on back-to-back days, and arrange to have a day off after big events. You have to be proactive here, as otherwise your time will fill up without you even realizing!
5. KEEP TO NORMAL ROUTINES
Keeping a routine is tough during the holidays, as many of the touchstones are gone. You may be off work, the kids are home, there could be family staying with you – everything is all over the place! But sticking to your usual, tried-and-tested routines will never matter more. Keep your medication schedule, your sleep schedule, and your exercise routine. This helps you feel as well as you can, each and every day, no matter what else is going on.
6. BE ORGANIZED
No matter how much you scale back, there is still a laundry list of things to do over the holidays. You can get a lot done, even with chronic pain, if you remain organized. Make a list of all of your tasks, and prioritize them. Know in advance what you can let slide and what has to be done. Set a schedule and stick to it. It’s incredibly tempting to get caught up in holiday cheer and ignore warning signals, so set a hard “out” time for events in advance. This ensures you take care of your body, no matter what your heart may be telling you!
“YOU ARE IN CONTROL OF WHAT YOU CHOOSE TO CARE ABOUT AND WHERE YOU SPEND YOUR ENERGY; DON’T LET OTHER PEOPLE’S ABILITIES, SUCCESSES, OR EFFORTS IMPACT HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT WHAT YOU CAN DO.”7. DRIVE TWO CARS TO EVENTS
Guilt for dampening loved ones’ merriment can be a big issue, so plan ahead to avoid it. Driving two cars to an event means that you can leave when you need to, without hindering anyone else’s fun. It gives you and your loved ones maximum flexibility. Difficulty driving? Plan in advance to take a taxi or Uber home early.
8. COMMUNICATE
You are not the only person who will be stressed over the holidays. It’s pretty much guaranteed that everyone else is feeling rushed and a little overwhelmed. This may mean that usually sensitive or helpful friends and family suddenly seem less caring, or too busy for what you need. It’s important to understand that this isn’t about you. Remember to cut them some slack for any thoughtlessness, and be clear when stating what you need and what you can and can’t do.
9. ENJOY YOURSELF
With all this talk about “coping” and “managing” and “chores,” it can be easy to forget the holidays are supposed to be a time of fun. So don’t forget to have some! Make time for yourself and what you enjoy, even if it means saying no to someone else. You don’t have unlimited energy or strength, and you can’t do everything. Be kind to yourself, and choose one or two special activities that are just for you.
10. REMEMBER: IT’S NOT A COMPETITION
This time of year can sometimes feel like a never-ending exercise in living up to (or failing) other people’s expectations. But it doesn’t have to be. It doesn’t matter how amazing your neighbor’s decorations are, or the face your mother-in-law makes when she sees your store-bought holiday spread. You are in control of what you choose to care about and where you spend your energy; don’t let other people’s abilities, successes, or efforts impact how you feel about what you can do. Being in chronic pain is hard enough without all of the judgement, so let it go. It doesn’t matter what anyone else has done.
Shared from the US Pain Foundation.

Article Provided By: chicagoneuropain
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

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Top Twenty Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy

Top Twenty Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy
By LtCol Eugene B Richardson, USA (Retired) BA, MDiv, EdM, MS14 Comments

Each person’s experience varies depending on their type of Neuropathy, but in general following are the most common Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy:
1) Severe strange pains in your feet, legs, hands and other parts of the body; including “crawling insects” under your skin;
2) Balance is difficult when walking, getting dressed, getting out of bed or whenever you close your eyes;
3) Numbness / heavy / cardboard / heavy cement feeling/ Novocain feeling in your feet and legs;
4) Tingling or “vibration” like feelings in your feet and hands;
5) Electric shocks starting at the bottom of your feet/foot that shoot up your leg(s) and on almost any part of the body;
6) Bone pain especially in the feet on walking or standing;
7) Painful muscle spasms/cramps;
8) Skin may become painful to touch or loss of the feeling of touch; with Agent Orange skin rash;
9) Burning sensations in your feet and hands;
10) Loss, or lessening, of sensation for hot and cold;
11) Feeling like you are wearing socks when you are not;
12) The feeling you are walking on crumpled socks or stones;
13) Feet feel swollen or large;
14) Difficulty moving your hands or feet;
15) A feeling of clumsiness, tripping (foot drop) or dropping things;
16) Attacks of daily severe exhaustion with strange fatigue;
In more severe case of Peripheral Neuropathy you may also experience the following:
17) Problems with not sweating in lower body with excessive sweating in upper body;
18) Digestive (fullness; alternating diarrhea / constipation) and/or urinary problems (overflow incontinence);
19) Sexual problems (loss of sensation/feeling/moisture);
20) A tightening of your chest with an increased difficulty in breathing and/or swallowing; uncorrectable vision problems.

 

Article Provided By: neuropathyjournal
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

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Allodynia

What to know about allodynia

Someone who has allodynia feels pain from non-painful stimuli. For example, a person may feel pain from a light touch or when brushing their hair.
Allodynia can be a symptom of several different nerve conditions, or it can occur on its own.
Allodynia is not the same thing as an increased response to painful stimuli.

Some people feel extreme pain from something minor, such as a paper cut. Feeling increased pain or being hypersensitive to mild pain is called hyperalgesia.
Individuals with allodynia, however, feel pain when something is ordinarily painless.
Symptoms

Allodynia is characterized by intense feelings of pain with no clear cause.
Pain is one of the body’s protective mechanisms. It tells a person to stop doing something that is harmful.
For instance, a pain response causes a person to pull their hand away from a hot stove, preventing a severe burn. But people with allodynia perceive pain even though there is nothing harmful causing the pain.
The main symptom of allodynia is pain from non-painful stimuli.
Some people with allodynia may experience severe pain even from a few hairs brushing against their skin.
Symptoms can vary from mild to severe. Some people may feel a burning sensation while others feel an ache or squeezing pain.
Allodynia can limit the activities a person is able to do and decrease their quality of life. Common complications of allodynia include:
depression
anxiety
sleep disturbances
fatigue

Types of allodynia
There are three main types of allodynia, which are classified according to what causes the pain.
Regardless of the type of allodynia, pain is still the main symptom. Some people may only have one type of allodynia. Others may have all three types of the condition.
Types of allodynia include:
Thermal allodynia: Thermal allodynia causes temperature-related pain. Pain occurs due to a mild change of temperature on the skin. For example, a few drops of cold water on the skin may be painful.
Mechanical allodynia: Movement across the skin causes mechanical allodynia. For instance, bedsheets pulled across a person’s skin may be painful.
Tactile allodynia: Tactile allodynia, also called static allodynia, occurs due to light touch or pressure on the skin. For example, a tap on the shoulder may cause pain for someone with tactile allodynia.

Causes and risk factors

Something as simple as hair being brushed may cause intense pain to someone with allodynia.
The exact cause of allodynia is not known.
Allodynia may occur due to increased responsiveness or malfunction of nociceptors, which are a particular type of nerve.
Having one of the following medical conditions may also increase a person’s risk of developing allodynia.
Migraines: Migraines can cause debilitating head pain, but a headache is often not the only symptom. Migraines can also cause additional symptoms, such as nausea and sensitivity to sound and light. According to the American Migraine Foundation, up to 80 percent of people experience symptoms of allodynia during a migraine.
Postherpetic neuralgia: Postherpetic neuralgia is a complication of shingles, which is caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox. Shingles can cause damage to the nerve fibers, which leads to persistent nerve pain and is associated with allodynia.
Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a medical condition that causes widespread pain in the body. The cause of fibromyalgia is not known, but there does appear to be a genetic link in some instances. There also seems to be a connection between allodynia and fibromyalgia.
Diabetes: Over time, diabetes can cause damage to nerves, increasing the likelihood that a person will develop allodynia. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is essential to the nervous system, and some experts have suggested that diabetes can lower NGF levels. A recent study in rodents showed that low levels of NGF led to both hyperalgesia and allodynia.
Complex regional pain syndrome: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a long-term pain condition that tends to affect one limb, typically after the person injures the area. People believe CRPS occurs due to problems with the nervous systems.

Diagnosis and when to see a doctor
There is not one specific medical test to diagnose allodynia. Instead, a doctor will perform a physical exam, take a medical history, and review a person’s symptoms.
Many common conditions can cause chronic pain, so doctors may need to rule out certain medical conditions before they can make a diagnosis of allodynia.
Various nerve sensitivity tests may also be performed to help make a diagnosis.
Anyone who experiences pain from non-painful stimuli, such as light touch, should see their doctor.
Dealing with chronic pain that develops after even the mildest touch can be frustrating and upsetting. Receiving an accurate diagnosis can help someone start the treatment and management process.

Treatment

Topical creams may help to treat the symptoms of allodynia. Recommended treatment will be based on the cause of the condition.
Currently, there is no cure for allodynia. Treatment is aimed at decreasing pain, using medications and lifestyle changes.
Pregabalin is a medication used to treat nerve pain associated with conditions, such as spinal cord injuries, diabetes, fibromyalgia, and shingles. It may also decrease pain in some people with allodynia.
Topical pain medications, such as creams and ointments containing lidocaine, may be helpful in some cases. Over-the-counter, non-steroidal medicines may also be effective.
Complementary approaches to pain management, such as acupuncture and massage, may not be tolerated as they involve touch and can lead to discomfort for a person with allodynia.
Treating an underlying condition that is causing allodynia may also help. For example, preventing migraines or treating migraines straightaway can help reduce the risk of allodynia symptoms. Getting diabetes under good control can also be helpful.
Some people might find that lifestyle changes, such as light exercise, a healthful diet, and getting enough sleep might help.
Research shows that smokers experience more chronic pain than nonsmokers. Quitting smoking can be beneficial on many levels, from improving circulation to decreasing inflammation.
Although living a healthful lifestyle will not cure allodynia, it can enhance overall health and help people with the condition cope more efficiently.
Identifying and decreasing pain triggers as much as possible may also reduce symptoms. It may not be possible to limit all the things that cause discomfort, but some changes may help.
For example, it might not be reasonable for someone to shave their head if brushing their hair hurts. But switching to a different type of brush or brushing it less frequently may be possible.
Similarly, if certain fabrics hurt the skin, a person can try clothing made of a different, less irritating material.
Stress may make the pain worse in some people. So, learning stress management techniques may also help.
Although stress reduction may not improve allodynia in every case, developing better stress management techniques can help a person cope with their condition.

Outlook
Allodynia is not life-threatening, but it can make daily life difficult and cause frustrating limitations. It can also lead to anxiety and other mental health conditions.
The outlook for people with allodynia varies depending on the severity of the condition. Taking a comprehensive approach to treatment can improve the outlook.
Using a combination of pain management techniques along with lifestyle changes may decrease symptoms of allodynia.
A holistic approach can also help someone feel more in control of their condition and improve their overall quality of life.

Article Provided By: medicalnewstoday
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

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Paresthesia

What Is Paresthesia?

If you’ve ever felt as though your skin was crawling, or had numbness or itching for no apparent reason, you may have experienced paresthesia.
Almost everyone has experienced paresthesia on occasion. One of the most common times people get that familiar feeling of pins and needles is when their arms or legs “fall asleep.” This sensation usually occurs because you’ve inadvertently put pressure on a nerve. It resolves once you change your position to remove the pressure from the affected nerve. This type of paresthesia is temporary and usually resolves without treatment. If the paresthesia persists, you may have an underlying medical disorder that requires treatment.
What are the symptoms of paresthesia?
Paresthesia can affect any part of the body, but it commonly affects the:
hands
arms
legs
feet
It can be temporary or chronic. The symptoms can include feelings of:
numbness
weakness
tingling
burning
cold
Chronic paresthesia may cause a stabbing pain. That may lead to clumsiness of the affected limb. When paresthesia occurs in your legs and feet, it can make it difficult to walk.
See your doctor if you have symptoms of paresthesia that persist or affect with your quality of life. It could be a sign that you have an underlying medical condition that needs treatment.

What causes paresthesia?
It’s not always possible to determine the cause of paresthesia. Temporary paresthesia is often due to pressure on a nerve or brief periods of poor circulation. This can happen when you fall asleep on your hand or sit with your legs crossed for too long. Chronic paresthesia may be a sign of nerve damage. Two types of nerve damage are radiculopathy and neuropathy.
Radiculopathy
Radiculopathy is a condition in which nerve roots become compressed, irritated, or inflamed. This can occur when you have:
a herniated disk that presses on a nerve
a narrowing of the canal that transmits the nerve from your spinal cord to your extremity
any mass that compresses the nerve as it exits the spinal column
Radiculopathy that affects your lower back is called lumbar radiculopathy. Lumbar radiculopathy can cause paresthesia in your leg or foot. In more severe cases, compression of the sciatic nerve can occur and may lead to weakness in your legs. The sciatic nerve is a large nerve that starts in your lower spinal cord.
Cervical radiculopathy involves the nerves that provide sensation and strength to your arms. If you have cervical radiculopathy, you may experience:
chronic neck pain
paresthesia of the upper extremities
arm weakness
hand weakness
Neuropathy
Neuropathy occurs due to chronic nerve damage. The most common cause of neuropathy is hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar.
Other possible causes of neuropathy include:
trauma
repetitive movement injuries
autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis
neurological diseases, such as MS
kidney diseases
liver diseases
stroke
tumors in the brain or near nerves
bone marrow or connective tissue disorders
hypothyroidism
deficiencies in vitamin B-1, B-6, B-12, E, or niacin
getting too much vitamin D
infections, such as Lyme disease, shingles, or HIV
certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs
exposure to toxic substances, such as chemicals or heavy metals
Nerve damage can eventually lead to permanent numbness or paralysis.

Who is at risk for paresthesia?
Anyone can experience temporary paresthesia. Your risk of radiculopathy increases with age. You also may be more prone to it if you:
perform repetitive movements that repeatedly compress your nerves, such as typing, playing an instrument, or playing a sport such as tennis
drink heavily and eat a poor diet that leads to vitamin deficiencies, specifically vitamin B-12 and folate
have type 1 or 2 diabetes
have an autoimmune condition
have a neurological condition, such as MS

How is paresthesia diagnosed?
See your doctor if you have persistent paresthesia with no obvious cause.
Be prepared to give your medical history. Mention any activities you participate in that involve repetitive movement. You should also list any over-the-counter or prescription medications that you take.
Your doctor will consider your known health conditions to help them make a diagnosis. If you have diabetes, for example, your doctor will want to determine if you have nerve damage, or neuropathy.
Your doctor will probably perform a full physical exam. This will likely include a neurological exam as well. Blood work and other laboratory tests, such as a spinal tap, may help them rule out certain diseases.
If your doctor suspects there’s a problem with your neck or spine, they may recommend imaging tests, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans.
Depending on the results, they may refer you to a specialist, such as a neurologist, orthopedist, or endocrinologist.

What is the treatment for paresthesia?
Treatment depends on the cause of your paresthesia. It may be possible to treat your condition by eliminating the cause in some cases. For example, if you have a repetitive movement injury, a few lifestyle adjustments or physical therapy may solve the problem.
If your paresthesia is due to an underlying disease, getting treatment for that disease can potentially ease the symptoms of paresthesia.
Your individual circumstances will determine whether your symptoms will improve. Some types of nerve damage are irreversible.

What is the outlook for people with paresthesia?
Temporary paresthesia usually resolves within a few minutes.
You may have a case of chronic paresthesia if those strange sensations don’t go away or they come back far too often. It can complicate your daily life if the symptoms are severe. That’s why it’s so important to try to find the cause. Don’t hesitate to seek a second opinion or see a specialist if necessary.
The severity of chronic paresthesia and how long it will last largely depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying condition solves the problem.
Be sure to tell your doctor if your treatment isn’t working so they can adjust your treatment plan.
How can you prevent paresthesia?
Paresthesia isn’t always preventable. For instance, you probably can’t help it if you tend to fall asleep on your arms. You can take steps to reduce the occurrence or severity of paresthesia, though. For example, using wrist splints at night may alleviate the compression of the nerves of your hand and help resolve the symptoms of paresthesia you experience at night.
Follow these tips for preventing chronic paresthesia:
Avoid repetitive movement if possible.
Rest often if you need to perform repetitive movements.
Get up and move around as often as possible if you have to sit for long periods.
If you have diabetes or any other chronic disease, careful monitoring and disease management will help lower your chances of having paresthesia.

Article Provided By: healthline
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Why Is Neuropathy Worse at Night?

January 3, 2020 / Brain & Spine
Why Is Neuropathy Worse at Night?
Reasons why nerve pain is more painful at night
Peripheral neuropathy is when a nerve or group of nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord is injured or dysfunctions. It could be because of an injury to a single nerve, like carpal tunnel syndrome, or because a group of nerves have become defective, like with peripheral neuropathy of the feet.
“Across the board we know that neuropathy can cause pain depending on what type of nerves are involved,” says neurologist Benjamin Claytor, MD. “When people describe worsening symptoms at night they’re describing discomfort – pins and needles, tingling and burning pain.”
Here Dr. Claytor discusses what might be causing this nightly pain and how to find relief.
Distraction
Our attention level can influence how we perceive pain. So during the day when we’re at work or taking care of the kids – we’re distracted and busy. Although there hasn’t been much research around it, the idea is that we aren’t focusing on the pain during the day because we’re busy, we pay less attention to it and perceive less pain.
“Many patients will tell me that after they get home from work, have dinner and sit down to watch TV for the night that their pain flares up,” says Dr. Claytor. “This could be because the daytime distractions are now gone and you’re starting to unwind for the night.”
Temperature and sleep
Another thought behind nightly neuropathy has to do with temperature. At night our body temperature fluctuates and goes down a bit. Most people tend to sleep in a cooler room as well. The thought is that damaged nerves might interpret the temperature change as pain or tingling, which can heighten the sense of neuropathy.
Also consider poor sleep quality. If you’re not sleeping very well to begin with, either due to poor sleep habits or sleep related disorders, this could lead to increased pain perception.
Emotions and stress
Our emotional state can also influence how we perceive pain. Stress and anxiety can feed in to and amplify pain signaling. Living in a chronic state of stress wreaks havoc on your physical and mental health.
Medication
Sometimes medication dosing and timing might need to be adjusted, which could be particularly true for some short acting medications used for neuropathy pain.
How to stop neuropathy pain at night
“There are options we can explore if your neuropathy pain seems to be worsening at night,” explains Dr. Claytor. “There might be oral or topical medications we can prescribe, or maybe it’s getting your stress under control and being more mindful.”
Cognitive behavioral therapy, physical therapy and meditation may be complementary tools to reduce pain as well.
Dr. Claytor stresses the importance of talking to your doctor sooner rather than later. Often time’s people will wait so long to see their physician that there’s permanent nerve damage that might have been avoided.
“I think one of the most important things I can discuss with a patient who comes in with neuropathy pain at night is getting to the root cause of what is actually driving it,” says Dr. Claytor. “Depending on what the underlying cause is, treating that first and foremost can usually help reduce the pain overall – especially at night.”

 

Article Provided By: health.clevelandclinic
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Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic Pain

What is neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain can result after damage or dysfunction of the nervous system. Pain can rise from any level of the nervous system. These levels are the peripheral nerves, spinal cord, and brain. Pain centers receive the wrong signals from the damaged nerve fibers. Nerve function may change at the site of the nerve damage, as well as areas in the central nervous system (central sensitization).
Neuropathy is a disturbance of function or a change in one or several nerves. About 30% of neuropathy cases is caused by diabetes. It is not always easy to tell the source of the neuropathic pain. There are hundreds of diseases that are linked to this kind of pain.
What are some of the sources of neuropathic pain?
Alcoholism
Amputation (results in phantom pain)
Chemotherapy drugs (Cisplatin®, Paclitaxel®, Vincristine®, etc.)
Radiation therapy
Complex regional pain syndrome
Diabetes
Facial nerve problems
HIV infection or AIDS
Shingles
Spinal nerve compression or inflammation
Trauma or surgeries with resulting nerve damage
Nerve compression or infiltration by tumors
Central nervous system disorders (stroke, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, etc.)
What are the symptoms of neuropathic pain?
Many symptoms may be present in the case of neuropathic pain. These symptoms include:
Spontaneous pain (pain that comes without stimulation): Shooting, burning, stabbing, or electric shock-like pain; tingling, numbness, or a “pins and needles” feeling
Evoked pain: Pain brought on by normally non-painful stimuli such as cold, gentle brushing against the skin, pressure, etc. This is called allodynia. Evoked pain also may mean the increase of pain by normally painful stimuli such as pinpricks and heat. This type of pain is called hyperalgesia.
An unpleasant, abnormal sensation whether spontaneous or evoked (dysesthesia)
Trouble sleeping
Emotional problems due to disturbed sleep and pain
Pain that may be lessened in response to a normally painful stimulus (hypoalgesia)
Diagnosis and Tests
How is neuropathic pain diagnosed?
Your doctor will take a medical history and do a physical exam. Neuropathic pain is suggested by its typical symptoms when nerve injury is known or suspected. Your doctor will then try to find the underlying cause of the neuropathy and then trace the symptoms.
Management and Treatment
How is neuropathic pain treated?
The goals of treatment are to:
Treat the underlying disease (for example, radiation or surgery to shrink a tumor that is pressing on a nerve)
Provide pain relief
Maintain functionality
Improve quality of life
Multimodal therapy (including medicines, physical therapy, psychological treatment, and sometimes surgery) is usually required to treat neuropathic pain.
Medicines commonly prescribed for neuropathic pain include anti-seizure drugs such as Neurontin®, Lyrica®, Topamax®, Tegretol®, and Lamictal®. Doctors also prescribe antidepressants such as Elavil®, Pamelor®, Effexor®, and Cymbalta®. A doctor’s prescription for anti-seizure drugs or antidepressants does not mean you have seizures or are depressed.
A topical patch (Lidocaine® or Capsaicin®) or a cream or ointment can be used on the painful area. Opioid analgesics can provide some relief. However, they generally are less effective in treating neuropathic pain. Negative effects may prevent their long-term use.
The pain can also be treated with nerve blocks given by pain specialists, including injections of steroids, local anesthetics, or other medicines into the affected nerves.
Neuropathic pain that has not responded to the therapies mentioned above can be treated with spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve stimulation, and brain stimulation.
Outlook / Prognosis
What is the outlook for people with neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is difficult to get rid of, but is not life-threatening. Without rehabilitation and sometimes psychosocial support, treatment has a limited chance of success. With help from a pain specialist using the multimodal approaches listed above, your neuropathic pain can be managed to a level that improves your quality of life.
© Copyright 1995-2020 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved.

Article Provided By: clevelandclinic
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Peripheral Neuropathy Diet Guide

Peripheral Neuropathy Diet: Best Foods That Heal Nerve Damage (And 4 Foods to Avoid With Neuropathy)
October 23, 2018 by Kelly

If you suffer from peripheral neuropathy, your first line of defense should be diet and lifestyle. (1) Good nutrition can help to slow nerve damage and even reverse nerve pain.
Peripheral neuropathy is a painful and disruptive condition that many with diabetes experience. Symptoms tend to start small, with numbness or tingling in the extremities, however this discomfort increases over time if no steps are taken to fight it. Eventually, the pain from peripheral neuropathy can be so severe that normal activities, like walking or putting on gloves, can become unbearable.
Fortunately, with the correct diet, you can calm nerves and help relieve nerve pain. There are foods that have been shown to help alleviate neuropathic pain and help to heal nerves, avoiding future complications.
Neuropathy is not an inevitable consequence of diabetes. If you want to stop this disease in its tracks and begin to feel relief, you must take steps to optimize your nutrition.
Nerve Regeneration Foods That Stimulate Nerve Growth, Heal Nerve Damage, and Help Pain Relief
The pain and other symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are due to damage to neurons, which are the cells that make up your nervous system. By improving the health of your nervous system and providing your body with the nutrients that it needs to regenerate nerves, you can protect yourself from further pain.
The regeneration of nerves has been tied to improved quality of life and reduced symptoms for those with neuropathy. (1,2) There are numerous foods that have been found to encourage the growth of new neurons.
Spinach
Leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, dandelion greens, cilantro, and parsley, are packed full of phytonutrients that are known to boost human health. Two of these nutrients that have been shown to help neuropathy are folate and magnesium.
Folate
Folate, also known as folic acid, is another name for vitamin B9. Folate is commonly found in plant foods, and is important for cell growth.
Metformin is a prescription drug often used to treat those with type 2 diabetes. (3) With long-term use, it helps to lower blood sugar levels. While metformin is effective at lowering blood sugar levels, it does not do so without side effects.
One of the side effects is a reduction in serum levels of folic acid and cobalamin, with an increase in Hcy. This alteration of serum makeup has been implicated in the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that metformin may lead to this complication.
In order to counteract these effects and protect your peripheral neurons, it may be helpful to increase your intake of folic acid to counteract these effects. (4) In an animal study it was found that folic acid supplementation resulted in higher expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in rats with a condition similar to diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This research suggests that folic acid may play a protective role for nerve health and function in those with diabetes.
Spinach is one of the foods richest in folate, leading to benefits in nerve regeneration and a possible role in protecting against the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.
Magnesium
Human studies on those with type 2 diabetes have found that lower blood levels of magnesium are associated with dampened peripheral nerve function. (6) Other studies have found that supplementing with magnesium may help to improve blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels in those with type 2 diabetes. (7)
Studies suggest that higher magnesium levels are tied to improved functioning of the peripheral nerves, helping to reduce the likelihood of peripheral diabetic neuropathy progression.
As spinach is second only to almonds as a dietary source of magnesium, adding spinach to your daily diet can help to protect peripheral nerve function. (8)
Almonds, Cashews, and Peanuts
When it comes to quality sources of dietary magnesium, only almonds have higher quantities than spinach. (8) In one ounce of dry roasted almonds, you can acquire 20% of the recommended daily allotment of magnesium.
Cashews and peanuts are two other sources high in magnesium. As outlined above, type 2 diabetes patients who have higher blood levels of magnesium tend to have better peripheral nerve function, as well as other parameters associated with diabetes and diabetic neuropathy progression, such as blood glucose levels. (6,7)
By consuming more magnesium-rich foods, you may be able to protect the health and function of your peripheral nerves.
Black Beans, Edamame, and Kidney Beans
Three other healthful foods that are high in magnesium are black beans, edamame, and kidney beans. Thanks to rich levels of this mineral, these foods may help to protect against damage to peripheral nerves.
Broccoli
Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable that is rich in a wide array of nutrients, including chromium, an essential element that has been found to protect nerves from damage and improve insulin sensitivity.
Chromium
Chromium deficiency has been tied to impaired glucose tolerance and nerve dysfunction. Animal studies suggest that chromium supplementation can help in managing glucose levels in diabetes, which may also help to protect nerve function. (9)
In one case study, a 40 year old female who suddenly developed neuropathy was found to have a chromium deficiency. Supplementing with chromium reversed this neuropathy and the associated symptoms. (10)
While chromium deficiency is rare, adding in broccoli, the richest dietary source of chromium, may help those who are unknowingly deficient in this trace mineral. (11)
Foods That Calm Nerves and Relieve Pain
There are some foods that are known to help with the pain caused by peripheral neuropathy, calming nerves and thereby helping those with neuropathy find relief.
Flax Seeds, Chia Seeds, and Walnuts
Flax seeds, chia seed, and walnuts are three of the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids. The type of omega-3 fatty acid that they are rich in is ALA, or alpha-lipoic acid. It is this fatty acid in particular that has been shown in studies to help those suffering from neuropathy.
Alpha-Lipoic Acid
ALA, which is an antioxidant with potential for lowering blood glucose levels, has been shown in studies to offer an additional benefit of reducing diabetic neuropathic pain. (12)
In a human study on peripheral neuropathy, 600 mg of ALA supplemented for 90 days was found to decrease neuropathy symptoms in some, and fully resolve them in others. Pain, pressure, and sensation were improved.
It is easy to obtain 600 mg/day ALA with dietary sources only. You can get far more than 600 mg/day through 1 tablespoon of either flaxseed oil, chia seeds, walnuts or flaxseeds.
Seafood: Wild Caught Salmon and Other Fatty Fish
Wild-caught, cold-water fish, such as salmon, trout, tuna, and sardines, are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12. Research suggests that these two nutrients may help to encourage nerve growth, protect nerves from damage, and reduce the feelings of pain associated with neuropathy.
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: EPA and DHA
While nuts and seeds are high in the omega-3 fatty acid APA, coldwater fish are high in EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). Research examining the effect of fish oil and these fatty acids on neuropathy are limited, but this limited research suggests that these fatty acids may help to encourage nerve growth and act as neuroprotectants. (14)
Vitamin B12
Earlier in this article, we discussed how the diabetes medication metformin has been shown to lead to deficiencies in folate. The same study showed that those who take metformin also often suffer from a vitamin B12 deficiency. (3) These changes in serum makeup are thought to be the reason why it often leads to diabetic neuropathy in patients.
Vitamin B12 is critical for proper neurological function, with deficient levels implicated in nerve damage. (15) Some studies have found that supplementation with vitamin B12 may help to relieve the pain caused by neuropathy.
Seafood and fish are the primary sources of vitamin B12 in the human diet. It is primarily coldwater fish that are the highest in vitamin B12. In order to increase your intake of this vitamin and omega-3 fatty acids, it is recommended to consume 2-3 servings of coldwater fish each week.
Two of your best options for both are wild-caught salmon and trout. Other contenders are sardines, anchovies, and herring.
Turmeric
Turmeric is a spice most well-known for its role in the Indian dish curry, where it is the primary spice. Its health benefits have been touted for thousands of years in an ancient form of holistic medicine in India known as Ayurveda.
Research has found that the primary compound in turmeric that provides its powerful health benefits is curcumin. Studies have found that curcumin may be beneficial for those with diabetes and diabetic neuropathy.
Curcumin
The health benefits of curcumin are largely thanks to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant capacity. (16) It has demonstrated benefits in lowering blood glucose levels and protecting against diabetic neuropathy. Animal studies found reduced pain behavior and increased pain threshold in those treated with curcumin.
Foods To Avoid That Make Neuropathy Worse
Additionally, it is important not to eat foods that exacerbate your underlying diabetes. Elevated blood sugar levels are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, meaning that elevated blood sugar levels are likely to lead to disease progression and increased pain.There are numerous foods that have been implicated in the progression of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. These foods are often to thank for oxidative damage and inflammation that contribute to nerve pain.
With these things in mind, you should avoid the following foods: (17)
Refined Carbohydrates
Refined carbs are those that have had the healthful portions of the grains removed. Examples include white flour and white rice. Common foods that include refined carbs are white bread, bagels, baked goods, pancakes, crackers, and more.
Not only do these foods lack fiber and nutrients, but they are known to cause a spike in blood glucose levels. This glucose is involved in damaging nerves and thus the progression of diabetic neuropathy.
Foods with Added Sugars
Another common example of foods that have had any beneficial nutrients removed are white sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Unfortunately, nearly every fast food item and the vast majority of processed and packaged food at the supermarket include these ingredients.
Common examples of some of the worst offenders are sodas, candy, ice cream, baked goods, and fast food. These foods cause the biggest spike in blood sugar of any food out there, so it is important to avoid these as much as possible.
Saturated and Trans Fats
Fats are a complicated and often confusing category of food for those with diabetes and other health concerns. There are some fats that are good for your health, some that are bad, and some that are alright in moderation.
Generally, you want to stay away from saturated fats, which are those that tend to be solid at room temperature, and trans fats. Examples of foods high in saturated fats include lard, cream, butter, processed meats, and red meats. Those high in trans fats include margarine, shortening, and fast food.
Click here for a complete guide on “good” and “bad” fats.
Alcohol
When consumed in moderation, alcohol may not cause much damage when it comes to neuropathy, but when consumed in excess, alcohol can cause damage to nerves. In fact, there is such thing as alcoholic neuropathy, where excess alcohol consumption causes nerve damage similar to that of diabetic neuropathy.
Additionally, alcoholism is associated with difficulties absorbing important nutrients whose deficiencies have been found to correlate with diabetic neuropathy. These include folate and vitamin B12.
Neuropathy Diet Tips
When it comes to what type of diet to follow, a low-fat, vegetarian diet appears to have benefits for those with diabetic neuropathy. (17,18) This type of diet is associated with improvements in blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and blood lipid concentration, all three factors which are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of both diabetes and diabetic neuropathy.
Even if you are unable to fully make the switch to a low-fat, vegetarian diet, you can use this diet as a kind of template for best practices. By cutting down on meat and dairy, particularly high-fat meat and dairy, and increasing your consumption of nutrient-rich plant foods, you can improve your health and your symptoms of diabetic neuropathy.
Additionally, you may want to work with a doctor if you suspect that you may have trouble digesting gluten. Celiac disease and neuropathy are related. It has been found that 2.5% of those with neuropathy have celiac disease, in comparison to only 1% of the normal population. (19) Because of this, you want to be sure that you do not have an underlying allergy to gluten that could be making your symptoms worse.

Article Provided By: Neuropathyreliefguide

 

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SCIf you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com

 

 

 

 

 

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