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Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Stress

Stress and Chronic Pain

Stress can worsen chronic pain. Although the exact relationship between stress and chronic pain is not known, several theories exist:

Muscle tension

Stress causes tension in the muscles, which can cause or increase pain, especially pain in the neck, shoulders and back. Studies show that thinking or talking about a stressful event increases tension in the back muscles of those with chronic back pain. When stress is chronic, muscles are often in a constant state of tension. This tension can lead to other pain, such as headaches and migraines.

Pain signals

The brain is constantly trying to inhibit pain signals, especially if a chronic pain condition is present. However, when a person is stressed, the brain’s ability to hinder those signals is reduced, which increases pain.

Inflammatory response

When stress is experienced, the immune system’s inflammatory response is activated. This inflammation can cause pain, especially with chronic pain conditions sensitive to inflammation, such as arthritis.

Perception

Stress can also increase the perception of pain. When dealing with stressors, the perception of pain may become more intense and overwhelming.

Coping tools

Relaxation techniques (yoga, meditation, breathing exercises, etc.), practicing good sleep hygiene, or seeing a mental health professional, such as a pain psychologist or psychiatrist, can decrease stress, and therefore, reduce pain. These practices can boost mood and improve daily function in those with chronic pain conditions.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Is Chronic Pain Diagnosed?

Chronic pain is defined as any type of pain that persists longer than six months. The pain may come and go, or it may be present all the time. Getting diagnosed properly is an important part of developing the right treatment plan.

Valuable questions

In order to determine pain levels, a health care provider often asks important questions, such as the following:

  • When did the pain begin?
  • What does the pain feel like?
  • Where is the pain located?
  • What pain treatments have been tried? Did they help?
  • Does the pain impact everyday life?
  • How is the pain affecting the ability to function?
  • What activities make the pain worse?
  • Does the pain interfere with sleep?
  • Does the pain cause mood fluctuations?

Tracking this information at home and maintaining a pain log is an effective way to help a health care provider determine a diagnosis and find appropriate treatments.

What is a pain scale?

A pain scale is a tool used by health care providers to determine the severity of pain. There are different types of pain scales and the type of information the scale gathers often depends on the scale. Information gathered includes, but is not limited to: pain severity, duration, pain type, and emotional impact. Informing the health care provider of fluctuations of pain levels throughout the day is helpful for diagnosis and treatment. If certain things make the pain worse or better, be sure to label those activities with a pain number and tell the provider.

What other tests are done to diagnose chronic pain?

In addition to using a pain scale, a doctor may also order an MRI, a CT scan, and/or an X-ray to determine a proper diagnosis. Other diagnostic tests include, but are not limited to: muscle function tests, nerve conduction tests, bone scans, and blood tests.

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Emotions and Chronic Pain

Living with chronic pain can cause resentment, frustration and anger. These emotions can be directed toward health care professionals, friends, family members, co-workers or even the individual who suffers from chronic pain. Anger is the one of the most prominent emotions when dealing with a chronic pain condition. Although anger is a natural emotion, too much anger can interfere with pain management.

Uncontrolled anger can increase pain levels, affect physical functioning, disrupt sleep patterns, interfere with social connections, and lead to a loss of emotional support. Anger has also been linked to increased inflammation and muscle tension. Learning how to effectively deal with anger does not mean giving in to the pain. Emotional awareness is the first step in processing anger.

Honest, open communication with friends, family, and health care professionals about chronic pain-related anger is extremely important due to the impact anger can have on others. Becoming mindful of anger provides the opportunity to reframe thoughts and find alternative ways to respond.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Pain Therapy, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina, Exercises

Lifestyle Tips to Control Neuropathy

There are many complications due to diabetic neuropathy. Here are a few lifestyle and home remedies to help manage diabetic neuropathy.

Watch your blood pressure

Hypertension, high blood pressure, is commonly seen in people with diabetes which increases the complications of diabetic neuropathy. The damaged blood vessels reduce blood flow. Always check your blood pressure to avoid any future complications.

Eating Healthy

The best way to control your blood sugar levels is watching what you eat. Focus on eating a well-balanced healthy diet full of fresh, unprocessed, whole foods. Reduce simple carbohydrates, and any added sugar or additive. Limiting your saturated and trans-fat intake and sticking to unsaturated fats. Eating lean proteins, fiber, omega-3 fatty acids help lower or maintain complications. Triglycerides are high risk factors for diabetic complications. In place of table sugar, use stevia to avoid spikes in your blood sugar levels. Drink lots of filtered water and avoid soda, juices, and other sweetened drinks. Always read the nutrition label to know what is entering your body.

Staying active

Daily exercise and activity is the best way to control your diabetic symptoms, blood sugar, high blood pressure, healthy weight, and flexibility. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 30 minutes of moderate-intense exercise should be performed at least 5 times a week. If severe neuropathy is present, you might be recommended to non-weight-bearing activities such as bicycling or swimming.

Quit Smoking

If you have diabetic neuropathy, you are more prone to develop kidney problems. Therefore, reducing additional stress on the kidney from the toxins in smoking can help. Smoking is a risk factor for diabetic neuropathy and developing circulations issues in your feet. You have a higher chance than a nonsmoker to die of a heart attack or stroke.

Contact your healthcare provider if you need further assistance in controlling your diabetic neuropathy.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Cope

10 Tips to Cope With Chronic Pain

1. Practicing meditation or deep, controlled breathing

Deep breathing and meditation guide the body and mind into a state of relaxation. Deep breathing involves slowly inhaling through the nose (so the belly expands), holding for a few counts and slowly exhaling through the mouth (so the belly deflates). Meditation involves the repetition of a positive word or phrase (mantra) while deep breathing in a comfortable position.

Chronic Pain, Cope, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

2. Easing stress in daily life

Undesirable feelings of anxiety, depression, anger, sadness and stress can escalate the body’s pain response. Reducing everyday stress triggers helps reduce chronic pain symptoms.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

3. Finding a support group

Engaging with other people who have chronic pain helps individuals feel less isolated and better understood. Individuals may also be introduced to new coping methods or treatment options by other members in the group.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

4. Exercising to release natural endorphins

Exercise releases endorphins, which are brain chemicals that support mood while simultaneously blocking pain signals. Exercise, when done in moderation, can help reduce chronic pain.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5. Keeping a daily journal of pain level and activities

Keeping a daily journal not only helps express feelings and emotions, it also provides insight into chronic pain trends and effective coping mechanisms. Sharing a pain journal with a health care professional helps them better understand how an individual’s chronic pain is managed between visits, which leads to better treatment.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

6. Limiting alcohol intake

The consumption of alcohol often disrupts sleep. Because sleep issues are often a symptom of chronic pain conditions, cutting back alcohol intake or nixing the habit altogether can increase the quality of sleep which promotes pain reduction.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

7. No smoking

In addition to the many negative health consequences of smoking cigarettes, smoking also causes circulation problems which can aggravate pain levels.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

8. Scheduling a massage

Massage therapy can both lessen muscle tension and reduce stress. Getting regular massages can help reduce pain levels.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

9. Eating a healthy diet

Eating a healthy diet can help reduce the risk of heart disease, aid healthy digestion, improve blood sugar levels and maintain a healthy weight. Choosing anti-inflammatory foods is especially helpful for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Cope, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

10. Taking the focus away from the pain

Focusing on positive things or engaging in an activity that keeps the mind busy diverts attention away from chronic pain. While pain may not be fully alleviated, distraction is a powerful pain-reduction tool.

Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina
Article Provided By: PainScale
Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Accepting a Chronic Pain Diagnosis

Receiving a diagnosis of chronic pain can be devastating; yet a clear diagnosis can also bring peace of mind to those who have internally questioned why they are in pain. As with any chronic health condition, chronic pain requires individuals to actively make changes in their lives to reduce the severity of the condition. This usually involves a combination of medical treatments, lifestyle changes and psychological help.

After receiving a chronic pain diagnosis, individuals often go through stages of emotions similar to the Kübler-Ross model of grief. They are grieving life as they once knew it. Emotions that may be experienced include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Shock and denial
    In the beginning, individuals in chronic pain may resist going to needed doctor’s appointments because it may be difficult to face the truth. Even after a diagnosis, individuals may be in shock or denial and not agree with the diagnosis or treatment plan(s).
  • Anger
    After the initial phase of denial, anger usually arises. Not only can the experience of pain cause angry feelings, but receiving a diagnosis of chronic pain can lead to frustration and irritation. Individuals may ponder, “Why me?” or “How could this have happened?”
  • Bargaining, fear and anxiety
    Individuals with chronic pain may experience fear about the future. “What if” thoughts often creep into the psyche. Struggling to find the “meaning of life” after a chronic pain diagnosis is common.
  • Depression
    Thirty to fifty percent of individuals with chronic pain also deal with depression. Chronic pain can cause depression, and depression can increase chronic pain; it is often a vicious cycle.
  • Acceptance and hope
    While most individuals with chronic pain eventually gain acceptance of their condition, some individuals never reach this stage as they are stuck in anger, fear or depression. Accepting a chronic pain diagnosis does not mean giving into it. An individual may experience pain for the rest of their life, but they can always control their reaction to it with treatment(s) and lifestyle changes. Acceptance takes time. Adjusting to a major lifestyle change is a process. Psychotherapy, group therapy or simply family support are all important factors in finding acceptance of and hope for a chronic pain diagnosis. Anti-depressant medications are available for those diagnosed with clinical depression.

These emotional stages do not follow a strict schedule nor are they always sequential. People with chronic pain may experience many emotions at once or their emotions may fluctuate among the stages.

Individuals with chronic pain experience a plethora of emotions in relation to their chronic pain: anger, frustration, anxiety, depression, etc. These are common emotional reactions; however, when they affect daily living, they should be shared with a health care provider. Talking with a trusted family member, seeing a mental health counselor or joining a support group can help an individual properly deal with the emotional aspects of chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Neuropathy and Chronic Back Pain

As many as 10 percent of the world’s population currently have neuropathic pain. Chronic neuropathic pain, sometimes referred to as peripheral neuropathy or peripheral neuritis, is caused by nerve damage.

How Does Neuropathic Pain Develop?

Neuropathic pain differs from other kinds of pain. For example, when a person breaks a bone, the nerves located at the site of the break carry pain signals to the brain. But with neuropathic pain, the damage is contained in the nerves themselves.

In most cases, neuropathy is caused when a dysfunction occurs in the way nerves respond to trauma or injury. The nerves become hypersensitive and send false pain signals to the brain when the original injury or trauma has actually healed. Most injuries begin in the peripheral or central nervous system.

Back Pain May Result In Neuropathy

Any type of condition or injury that compresses a nerve can lead to neuropathy. A herniated disc is a good example of a back injury that can result in neuropathy. Other forms of neuropathic pain that originate in the spine or back include the following:

  • Sciatica or chronic pain that radiates down the leg
  • Cervical radiculopathy or chronic pain that runs down the arm
  • Failed back surgery or any pain that occurs after surgery and persists

Other forms of neuropathy may be caused by complex regional pain syndrome, diabetes, injections, injury, disease, substance abuse or exposure to toxins. However, the cause of neuropathy is not always apparent.

Early Treatment Is Critical

Treatment of neuropathy in its early stages offers the best opportunity for successful treatment. Exposure to chronic pain may cause the central nervous system to become hypersensitive over time. In rare cases, this can lead to central sensitization, when even the slightest touch causes pain.

Neuropathy may also lead to other health problems, such as mobility issues, sleep difficulties, anxiety, depression and social isolation.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

The Different Types of Chronic Pain

There are several different types of chronic pain. Here are a few of the types that might impact you.

Neuropathic Pain

The human body contains a network of nerves called the peripheral nervous system. It consists of nerves that weave in and out of the spinal column to other parts of the body. These nerves transmit pain signals to the brain. If they are damaged (usually through injury or disease), this leads to neuropathic pain. When the nerves begin to malfunction, faulty pain signals are sent to the brain, thereby, leading to chronic neuropathic pain. An example of chronic neuropathic pain is when a nerve is crushed and damaged from an accident. The wound and bones may heal, but the nerve damage may lead to neuropathic chronic pain.

Nociceptive Pain

Nociceptive pain occurs when part of the body sustains an injury or a medical condition is present. Nociceptive pain is categorized into four types: somatic, bone, muscle and visceral.

  • Somatic Pain
    Somatic pain develops from external factors such as an injury to the skin, bones, muscles or ligaments. It is described as sharp and throbbing pain.
  • Bone Pain
    If a person breaks a bone, the break eventually heals. An example of chronic somatic bone pain would be if the bone continues to cause pain even after it is healed.
  • Muscle Pain
    Post-workout soreness is not an example of chronic pain. If the muscle has been worked to the point of persistent pain and spasms, this is an example of chronic somatic muscle pain. Muscle pain can also occur from certain medical conditions.
  • Visceral Pain
    Visceral pain initiates from internal organs. The troublesome part about visceral pain is that the brain cannot pinpoint exactly where the pain is originating. Visceral pain can be “referred” pain from another part of the body. For example, pain may be felt in the lower back but is actually originating from the kidneys. Seeking the advice of a medical professional is critical for a proper diagnosis.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Chronic Pain in the Workplace

Unless you have experienced day to day chronic pain, you cannot begin to imagine the physical and psychological burden many people live through. Chronic pain is an issue that is often not recognized in the workplace.

There is a term for people who work with chronic pain called “presenteeism,” which basically is the act of attending work while having an illness. However, presenteeism isn’t just attending work with a mild cold or the sniffles, it is going to work every day in spite of pain, fatigue, and other symptoms that are also present with chronic pain and sickness.

Presenteeism was recently studied by the Global Corporate Challenge (GCC), which concluded that though employees with chronic health conditions took on average, four sick days a year, they admitted to being unable to maintain productivity for an average of 57.5 days in a year.

The GCC study estimated that the cost of presenteeism was 10 times greater than absenteeism. Workers absent from work cost employers in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia about $150 billion a year, but those attending work but were not fully productive cost them $1,500 billion.

The authors of the study made note of the importance for companies to improve productivity by concentrating on reducing presenteeism.

It is unsure as to whether employers are cognizant or even care about how many of their employees are experiencing chronic pain difficulties. And in the event that they do, what expectations do they maintain for these employees. Do they comprehend the extent of the difficulty had by employees who are experiencing pain?

Chronic Pain and Lost Productivity

According to another report from the Institute of Medicine Committee on Advancing Pain Research, Care and Education, chronic pain is costing the U.S. economy somewhere in the range of $560 to $635 billion annually in healthcare costs and lost productivity. While many employees enduring pain choose to continue to work, they have difficulties maintaining productivity.

One potential solution – opioid pain medication – is no longer easily available, even for those who would not abuse the prescribed drugs and who want to be of use and have normal lives.

Research indicates about two million Americans misuse opioids, and a large portion of them end up in emergency rooms. However, that statistic does not acknowledge the millions of people that need pain medications and would use them responsibly.

Excessive prescribing guidelines – and fear of DEA oversight – keep doctors from giving prescriptions for pain medication, even those medicines that are comparatively safe and pose low risk of addiction. Guidelines and insurance reimbursement rules have essentially taken discretion away from responsible doctors in treating a patient’s pain.

Some patients suffering from chronic pain will forgo asking their doctors for pain medication due to the negative stigma that comes from opioid misuse and abuse.

Working with Pain

The greatest concern people who suffer from chronic pain have on a daily basis is how much longer they will be able to work. They fear their bosses will grow tired of the mistakes they make on the days they are hurting or when their focus is off due to pain and lack of ample sleep.

People with chronic pain are unsure as whether most employers and coworkers can truly commiserate and understand the overwhelming responsibility of maintaining a full-time job while living with chronic pain. Even if your employer is accommodating and allows workplace adjustments and the option of working from home on occasion, the basic demands of the job can still be too great to overcome when you are in pain.

Ideally, employers would offer possibilities for pain management on the job – in the form of wellness programs and workplace accommodation – so people could work to their full potential. Employees who feel supported will access all available aid, feel better, and perform better on the job.

However, most employers do not recognize how crucial their roles are in helping to manage the pain epidemic in the United States. They view chronic pain as a personal problem, rather than a work issue. Until those views change, people are left on their own to suffer and deal with working while being in pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
CRPS, Pain Relief, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10 Questions About CRPS

1. What is CRPS?

CRPS stands for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. It may also be referred to as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome. It is a chronic pain condition. Chronic pain means lasting 6 months or more. With CRPS, your nerves are affected, sending pain signals to the brain without an easy to diagnose cause. It may be caused by a malfunction in your central or peripheral nervous systems.

2. Is Excessive Sweating a Symptom of CRPS?

Yes, many people who have CRPS have issues with sweating. This includes sweating too much or not sweating at all. It is very common to have both extremes come and go when you are diagnosed with CRPS.

3. I am Experiencing Memory Problems. Is this a Symptom of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Yes, many people with CRPS experience forgetfulness, cognitive impairment, and memory issues.

4. Will CRPS Spread to Other Parts of the Body?

While it is not guaranteed, it is common for CRPS to spread in many cases. If Complex Regional Pain Syndrome does spread, it is usually to nearby areas. For example, if you have CRPS in your arm, it may spread to your hand or shoulder. If you have pain in your leg, it may spread to your foot or buttocks.

5. Will CRPS Go Away on its Own?

Unfortunately, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome will not simply go away. This is why early diagnosis and treatment is critical. In some cases, people can go undiagnosed with CRPS for years; if there is a possibility that a person may have CRPS, going to see a doctor is imperative.

6. Is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome a Life Long Disease?

There is no universal answer to this question. There are a variety of factors that may contribute to whether CRPS goes into remission or if a person will experience the symptoms for their entire life Chances may increase that a person achieves remission by having CRPS diagnosed by an expert as soon as symptoms are noticed.

7. Will Ice Help Alleviate the Pain?

In general, it is NOT recommended for those experiencing CRPS to use ice or hot and cold contrast therapy.

8. How Do I Find the Right Doctor?

It will be important to find a clinic that specializes or has a successful history or treating CRPS. Ask a primary care physician to provide a referral for a pain specialist who treats CRPS on a regular basis.

9. Can CRPS Be Treated with Medication?

Yes, there a variety of medications that can help with the pain that is experienced from CRPS. Since one medication is not necessarily better than the other, it will be important to get a proper diagnosis from a doctor.

10. Will a Nerve Block Help with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Yes, nerve blocks have been shown to be successful in treating CRPS; however, they may not consistently work. An individual’s response to treatment depends on the person and the variables surrounding their specific case of CRPS.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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