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Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5 Coping Skills for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain not only affects the body, it also affects the mind. While medical treatments for chronic pain are essential, they work best when combined with mental and emotional coping skills.

Skill 1: Learning

When diagnosed with a chronic pain condition, learning about the condition can ease the fear of the unknown. Individuals should be well-educated by a physician or other reputable resource(s) about their condition and treatment plan.

Participating in self-management education (SME) programs for chronic health conditions may also be helpful. These programs teach chronic pain management strategies that help to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life. More information can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

Skill 2: Accepting

Acceptance of chronic pain does not mean giving up or not investing any effort to reduce pain and increase quality of life. Instead, acceptance of a chronic pain diagnosis means recognizing the reality of the condition, which eases the emotional struggle with the situation. Acceptance of chronic pain allows individuals to focus on management and treatment.

Accepting chronic pain is a challenging skill that may be best addressed with a counselor or therapist. Both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have proven to be effective treatments for individuals with chronic pain conditions.

Skill 3: Relaxing

Relaxing while in pain can be challenging, but it is possible. Persistent pain can increase stress, and stress can increase chronic pain. It can become a vicious cycle.

Various relaxation techniques and practices, such as mindfulness, yoga, tai chi, diaphragmatic breathing and progressive muscle relaxation, can decrease the stress response, which can reduce chronic pain. Relaxation tapes, online tutorials or videos may also be helpful.

Biofeedback can also help with relaxation. During biofeedback training, a professional uses technology to help individuals learn to control bodily functions, such as heart rate and muscle tension. Once these skills are mastered, they can be practiced without the use of technology.

Skill 4: Pacing

Activity pacing is a skill in which individuals learn to pace themselves throughout the day in order to conserve energy and prevent increased pain. This often involves dividing large tasks into smaller ones. It can also include adjusting schedules. For example, if an event or activity is scheduled for the evening, activity pacing throughout the day helps conserve energy both physically and mentally.

Skill 5: Coping

The skill of coping involves using treatment tools, distraction techniques and learned skills when pain becomes severe. Coping treatment methods include taking pain medication, using hot and cold therapy, applying topical creams, getting a massage, etc.

Distraction techniques can also help individuals cope by focusing attention away from negative or painful thoughts. Watching a favorite movie, talking to a friend, or participating in a hobby or pastime are all examples of distractions.

It is important to note that even when these coping skills are mastered, unusual levels or unfamiliar types of pain should be discussed with a physician.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Treatment, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Manage Pain when Stuck at Home

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, patients with chronic diseases can find that stay-at-home orders pose added challenges. In many areas, medical care has been pared down to mostly urgent doctor visits, procedures, surgeries, and diagnostic tests. Many pain patients may find access to medical care or treatment more limited than ever. And stay-at-home orders can also mean spending more time around spouses, family members, or roommates, which can add even more stress to what is already a very high-anxiety situation.

If you are finding that being sequestered at home seems to be making your pain management all the more difficult, here is some food for thought to help you work through this time period:

  • Telemedicine and telehealth are part of the new normal right now. Physicians are relying on telemedicine more than ever during this pandemic, and there seems to be a rise in other virtual health and wellness services being offered. Besides having your typical doctor visit handled on-line or by telephone, you can also look for other complementary virtual resources from physical therapists, psychological counselors and therapists, life-coaches, yoga instructors, Pilates trainers, and nutritionists. For more social bonding, consider joining an on-line support group. Finding the right telemedicine and telehealth resources for your particular situation can be tricky, and it is always a good idea to talk to your physician first before starting something new.
  • Staying at home can easily break down the normal structure and boundaries that we are typically accustomed to. Not leaving home to go to work or run the usual errands can mean more idle time at home. Try to combat this by creating a schedule and some structure around your day that jives with others who are home with you. For example, schedule time to do things together, like perhaps preparing meals, cleaning the house, and watching a movie, while carving out room for everyone to have some time for themselves. Now might be harder than ever to find the time and space for self-care activities like meditation or exercise, so consider working out a plan with your house-mates that allows you to have important time for you.
  • There are some medical treatments that need to be put on hold right now. For example, most experts are recommending postponing routine pain procedures like epidural cortisone injections. In addition to the added risk of being at a medical facility during this time, there is also hypothetical risk that exposing the body to added cortisone could diminish its immune response. If there are medical treatments or procedures that have been put on hold that you typically rely on for pain relief, then this can be a trying time for you. But letting your angst get the best of you during this time period will only make your pain that much harder to control, so consider adding specific stress management techniques and relaxation tools to your routine at home.
  • Stepping outside of your usual routine can also be a chance to explore new ideas or treatments that you may have not otherwise considered. Never talked to a pain management psychologist before? Perhaps this is a time to give it a try. Research done on telemedicine counseling has looked pretty good so far. There might be a list of things that you have always wanted to look into but never had the time. This might be the opportunity for growth, development, and exploration that you’ve been waiting for.

While staying at home is what is needed right now, this can be a really challenging time for those with chronic pain. Consider re-calibrating your pain management strategies so you can get back on track.

Article Provided By: WebMD

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Treatment, Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Chronic Pain Affects Your Immune System

With so many questions right now about the dangers of the coronavirus (COVID-19), you might be wondering how chronic pain might affect the immune system’s ability to fight off disease.Since COVID-19 surfaced a few months ago, we’ve learned that certain people are more susceptible to it than others. Some of the factors that seem to increase severity of the illness include age, smoking, gender, co-existing chronic medical problems, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and underlying lung problems from diseases like COPD. This has led to a general view that those with more compromised immunes systems are more likely to experience the worst coronavirus episodes and a higher mortality rate.Both chronic pain and ongoing stress can impact immune function. According to past research done in laboratory mice at McGill University, chronic pain may reprogram the way genes work in the immune system. In fact, chronic pain seems to prompt changes in the way DNA is marked in special immune cells known as T cells. While it is unclear how much these changes affect the ability of these T cells to fight infection, there does appear to be a strong connection between chronic pain and DNA marker changes on these important infection fighters.

The experience of ongoing pain can certainly trigger a stress response, and if the pain remains chronic, this can lead to a state of long-term stress in the body. Think of the stress response as a combination of neurologic, endocrine, and immune system changes that come together to help the body ward off some type of perceived danger or threat. If the stress response persists, then levels of the hormone cortisol start to rise. Long-term elevations in cortisol levels are connected with a decline in immune system function. As an example, older caregivers have been found to have lower levels of immune cells like lymphocytes, slower wound-healing times, and are more susceptible to viral infections.

Patients with painful autoimmune disorders, like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, who are treated with immunosuppressive medications, are also at a greater infection risk. By their very nature, immunosuppressive agents inhibit the body’s natural immune response.

Chronic pain can also be associated with other chronic diseases that also impact the effectiveness of the immune system. Factors related to pain like the stress response and prolonged inactivity can lead to  changes in your body that elevate blood pressure and promote weight gain, which in turn become risk factors for developing heart disease, strokes, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. In fact, studies have found the incidence of cardiac disease to be significantly higher in those with chronic pain.To limit pain’s effect on your immune system, do what you can to decrease your body’s stress response. Consider calming down an over-anxious nervous system through simple relaxation techniques like breathing exercises, meditation, gentle yoga, or maybe learn special techniques from a psychologist or therapist. Other ways to lower stress include exercise, getting some fresh air, watching a funny movie, and just unplugging from your devices.Also, don’t rely only on your immune system – take steps that will minimize your risk of exposure to the virus in the first place:

  • Wash your hands – often – for at least 20 seconds with soap.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces in your home and car.
  • Practice social distancing. Stay at home as much as possible, away from public places and crowds.

And don’t forget to practice the practical steps that will keep your immune system working at its best: eat well, try to get plenty of sleep, and stay active.

Article Provided By: WebMD

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Pain Management, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Yoga

Can Yoga Ease Your Pain?

Have a pain problem and wondering if yoga can help? Yoga has many benefits other than improving chronic pain such as, bettering your mood, teaching you to better manage stress, and just plain helping you smile after a rough day. Yoga’s popularity in the U.S. has grown rapidly over the last decade. An estimated 36 million Americans now practice yoga regularly, and about one in three have tried it at least once. While it is most popular with younger and middle-aged women, the number of men practicing yoga has more than doubled in the last several years, and those 50 and older with a yoga practice has tripled during that same time frame. But how exactly does it fit in to building a better pain management strategy? 

Pain relief

There’s growing evidence that yoga may be helpful in a wide variety of pain scenarios – arthritic knees, aching necks, fibromyalgia, and headaches. Perhaps the strongest evidence of yoga’s effectiveness is in the treatment of chronic low back pain. A number of studies have found it to be effective in reducing back pain, and in at least one study, patients practicing yoga were able to reduce their use of pain medications. Recent evidence-based guidelines from the American College of Physicians strongly recommend yoga for treating low back pain.

Function

Research also seems to indicate that yoga has the potential to improve function with daily activities. A regular yoga practice can increase strength in the legs, upper body, and core, while also improving flexibility and balance, which are especially important for seniors. A number of studies have found that both low-back pain patients, as well as arthritis sufferers, become more active when engaged in a yoga practice.

Well-being
Yoga can also offer some indirect relief by boosting a better sense of well-being, helping reduce stress, and increasing optimism and resilience. Studies also suggest practicing yoga can be associated with other healthy lifestyle habits, like quitting smoking, eating healthier, and losing weight. It also holds mental health benefits; research shows that it can play a helpful role in treatment plans for depression and anxiety. But incorporating yoga into a pain management program can be a bit tricky, and it is recommended that you first talk to your physicians and physical therapists before getting started. There can be a lot of bending in many typical classes, which can be problematic for back and neck pain sufferers. Poses that require being on all fours, like a plank position or the traditional downward dog pose, can over-stress a symptomatic shoulder problem. And for those with knee problems, squatting and kneeling can be hard to handle. The good news is that most yoga movements and poses can be modified or altered in some way to avoid flaring up or aggravating a symptomatic part of the body. Some yoga studios even offer classes that can be done while sitting in a chair for those who need that type of accommodation. Yoga is something that is therapeutic for both the mind and the body, as opposed to just exercise. If you are a beginner, it may seem a bit intimidating figuring out where to start, especially since there are so many different types of yoga. Names used to describe practices that are more movement-based include Ashtanga and vinyasa, while other versions, like yin, iyengar, and restorative, are more focused on alignment and holding postures. Make sure to verify ahead of time if a class is going to be held at room temperature or will be heated, and always start with a class that is geared toward beginners. Seek out yoga teachers that like to give students personal attention and want to help them modify poses. And, if you have the means, you may want to start with a few private lessons.And above all else, make sure you have some fun!

Article Provided By: WebMD Blogs

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

How Spouses Cope with Chronic Pain

Taking on the role of caregiver is all too often placed upon an individual due to uncontrollable circumstances. When put in the position of being caregiver, there are certain suggestions that may help caregivers cope when their spouse develops chronic pain.

Finding the Right Doctor

Researching different doctors to find the most optimal match may be the first step. A list of doctors should be made, and both the caregiver and spouse should go through the list. The top 3 doctors should be selected, and appointments should be made for each so that multiple opinions may be given.

Once appointment day arrives, caregivers should follow these suggestions:

  • Dress nicely
  • Make it known that they are the caregiver
  • Take notes
  • Be prepared with questions

Questions that should be asked to the doctor:

  • Doctor’s experience with pain management
  • Doctor’s philosophy on pain management
  • Methods of pain management that they offer
  • Number of doctors on site
  • Best way to make appointments
  • Point of contact Doctor or physician’s assistant

Day-to-Day with Chronic Pain

Since change will happen quickly, here are a few tips to help with the transition:

  • Create a list of all medications
  • Note the time of day for taking medications
  • Create a rapport with your local pharmacist
  • People should be sure to listen and acknowledge the struggle faced by their spouse

The caregiver should remember to not forget themselves:

The road ahead of both caregiver and spouse will be long but they should not be discouraged down the road. Though the caregiver should show compassion to their spouse, they should not judge themselves harshly when feelings of hopelessness surface. While it is important for a caregiver to look after their spouse, they should not forget to treat themselves well in the process.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Caorlina

Navigating the Medical Maze

Approximately 100 million people live with chronic pain. Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts 3 to 6 months after the initial injury, surgery or physical trauma. In some cases, chronic pain has no known cause which makes obtaining a diagnosis and proper treatment plan a bit of a maze.

Here are some steps to take to help with the medical maze that often accompanies chronic pain:

Step one

When an individual feels pain and pain-related symptoms, such as tingling, throbbing, aching and swelling, medical attention is usually warranted, especially if the pain intensifies or worsens over time. The first step in obtaining a proper diagnosis (if the pain does not require immediate attention which would require a visit to an emergency department) is to make an appointment with a primary care provider (PCP). A PCP will take a medical history of past injuries, surgeries, medications and any other current or past conditions. An overall physical exam is typically performed to rule out any potential underlying illnesses that could be the cause of pain. Depending on the medical opinion of the PCP, a referral to a specialist may be provided. It is important to note that a chronic pain diagnosis requires that an individual has dealt with pain for 3-6 months or longer.

Step two

The next step involves seeing a specialist. The type of specialist an individual is referred to depends on the location of the pain and any test results from the primary care physician. Some of the most common specialists an individual may be referred to include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Rheumatologists
  • Orthopedists
  • Neurologists
  • Doctors of internal medicine
  • Physiatrists (Doctors of physical medicine and rehabilitation)

A specialist also takes a medical history, often asking very similar questions to the PCP. They also typically perform a physical exam, which may differ from the PCP’s exam; an exam with a specialist is often more in-depth. Depending on the specialist’s findings, more tests may be ordered, such as a CT scan or MRI. The specialist may also refer the individual to another medical specialist.

After consulting with a specialist, the hope is to receive a diagnosis and a treatment plan. However, this isn’t always the case; oftentimes, individuals endure multiple appointments and undergo numerous tests before a proper diagnosis and treatment plan is secured.

Step three

Pain management is complicated and is often a process of trial and error. While medication is the most common treatment option for chronic pain, a multitude of other treatment options are available. Deciding on a treatment plan is a process that involves both the health care provider and the individual. Generally, six treatment categories for managing chronic pain are available:

  • Medications
  • Interventional procedures (nerve blocks or injections)
  • Rehabilitative and occupational therapy
  • Pain psychology
  • Complementary alternative medicine (acupuncture, massage, etc.)
  • Self-management (diet, exercise and lifestyle changes)

Useful tips while navigating the medical maze

Finding doctors, securing appointments, undergoing tests and receiving a proper diagnosis does not happen overnight; it can be a lengthy process. Until a pain management plan is in place, some tips to deal with the pain include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Learn stress management techniques
  • Practice pacing oneself, even on the good days
  • Set realistic goals
  • Try to keep moving
  • Use distraction
  • Eat healthy
  • Keep a pain log

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Distraction Techniques for Chronic Pain

While medical treatments are essential when dealing with chronic pain, various complementary techniques are also available to combat pain. One of these valuable techniques is distraction.

Benefits of distraction

Focusing on pain can increase the perception of pain. It can also negatively affect an individual’s mood and increase feelings of helplessness. Changing that focus by using distraction not only prevents the focus-based increase in pain perception, but may actually reduce levels of pain.

Research on distraction techniques

Considerable research has been done on the use of distraction techniques as a tool for coping with pain, sometimes known as distraction analgesia. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University found that focusing on a task created distraction analgesia in many individuals with chronic pain. Dr. Ted Jones found that distraction decreased pain in 90 percent of his patients, usually by 20 to 50 percent. Distraction techniques have proven to be so effective that health care providers at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford currently use distraction-based virtual reality therapy with pediatric patients to reduce their pain and anxiety.

Suggestions for distraction

Individuals can try distraction to reduce their pain levels when they find themselves focusing solely on their pain. Engaging in an enjoyable activity provides distraction while also emphasizing the positive aspects of life. Participating in a hobby or a favorite pastime with family or friends prevents isolation and also provides distraction. Activities that require intense concentration, such as puzzles, games or skill tests, are also an effective way to divert attention away from pain.

Using distraction techniques helps provide individuals with a greater sense of control over their pain, which can improve mental well-being. Distraction can play a significant role in how individuals cope with chronic pain on a daily basis.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Types of Massages for Chronic Pain

Why Massage Therapy for Chronic Pain?

Massage therapy is turning out to be more broadly accepted as a dependable treatment for many types of chronic pain within the medical community. It is also accepted as an adjunct to other medical treatments. In general, massage is rarely given as the primary or sole treatment for pain management. It is often employed as one factor of therapy and to aid in preparing the patient to partake in exercise or other treatment methods. Regardless, massage can be an essential and operative component of your pain management routine.

Massages have been revealed to be especially effective in mitigating back pain. Due to the fact that back pain is a component of a wide array of pain conditions, massage is often considered to be beneficial to the healing process. Moreover, different types of massage will be useful for different segments of the body. Specifically, acupressure and shiatsu are intended to relieve different types of pain in different regions. Neuromuscular treatment is typically beneficial in relieving “referred” pain, which is pain that is activated by one part on the body, but is felt in an entirely different area.

Benefits of Massage Therapy

In general, benefits of massage therapy include: increased blood flow and enhanced circulation; muscle relaxation which subsequently improves range of motion; increased endorphin levels; improved sleep and lessened bouts of insomnia. Enjoy this quick summary on various types of massage that may be appropriate for you.

Swedish Massages

This is the most popular type of massage, therefore, most research regarding the benefits of massage have utilized Swedish massage techniques. It is important to note that Swedish massage is very gentle and does not target precise pain points or apply deep pressure. It is widely recognized as being highly relaxing which is excellent for sufferers of acute or chronic pain. Despite how mild Swedish massage is, it enhances blood flow and thus can aid in the removal of excess lactic acid from muscles, thereby helping alleviate muscle pain.

Neuromuscular Massages

This type of massage therapy is also known as “trigger point” massage due to the fact that it targets regions of tension and muscular spasm in the back. The massage therapist directs pressure to a particular region of interest. Neuromuscular massage can sometimes cause soreness at the outset since the focus of its pressure is directly on tender regions. Be sure to communicate with your therapist to identify the appropriate pressure. Similar to Swedish massage, neuromuscular massage also works to flush lactic acid out of the muscles to alleviate pain.

Acupressure

This type of massage stimulates vital spots on the body to impede pain sensations and stimulate the natural pain relievers of the body. In general, the best approach for pain relief is to apply sustained pressure on vital points for one to three minutes. This pressure is applied by using hands, fingers, or other devices.

Shiatsu

This form of massage is very similar to acupressure, as the word shiatsu literally means “finger pressure”. The primary difference is that practitioners of shiatsu do not use their full hand to apply pressure – only the fingers are used.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Psychological

Psychological Effects of Chronic Pain

The fact of the matter is that chronic pain wears on you. It’s difficult to bear not only physically, but mentally. Since more than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, the psychological effects of pervasive pain are far reaching in our society. Understanding the psychological issues that accompany chronic pain is important for pain specialists and patients alike.

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross’s five stages of grief have been used to break down and describe the experiences of people when they are grieving, giving a name and potentially helping people cope with feelings that seem all-powerful when you’re experiencing them. Chronic pain, both the diagnosis and experience, presents similar emotional upheaval. One PsyD, a Doctor Jennifer Martin, created the ‘7 stages of Chronic Pain and Illness’ to offer pain sufferers and physicians with a similar delineation. It’s important to remember that a person may experience these stages out of order or may circle back to an earlier stage. She describes them as follows:

Denial

When people realize that their pain may not be going away, it’s tough to swallow. They often experience shock and denial, which may prevent them from seeking out the help that they need to obtain proper treatment.

Pleading, Bargaining, and Desperation

Patients in this stage look for anything that may fix their condition or act as a bandage. They often bargain, either with themselves or a God, to make it better, all the while blaming themselves and experiencing tremendous guilt.

Anger

Once people understand that there’s no magical fix for their condition, they often experience anger. They may be mad at anyone related to their condition, including family, friends, care providers, employers, and anyone else they can tie their decline to.

Anxiety and Depression

Living with chronic pain can be scary and may bring on anxiety. It may also lead to depression. This occurs when a person feels hopeless, exhausted, and experience intense grief. This depression isn’t necessarily a mental illness, but an appropriate reaction to this type of change.

Loss of Self and Confusion

Chronic pain may lead to patients losing an integral part of their life. They may not be able to do the things they once did any longer, which can lead to an identity crisis of sorts.

Reevaluation of Life, Roles, and Goals

At this stage, people begin to come to terms with potential limitations and life changes. They begin to find a way to live their life within their new normal. Changing expectations of what things should be can help chronic pain patients find happiness despite their condition.

Acceptance

This doesn’t necessarily mean being alright with the way things are now. It simply means they’ve accepted the reality of their condition and are taking steps to live within that reality. It means choosing to move forward despite chronic pain.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Stress

Stress and Chronic Pain

Stress can worsen chronic pain. Although the exact relationship between stress and chronic pain is not known, several theories exist:

Muscle tension

Stress causes tension in the muscles, which can cause or increase pain, especially pain in the neck, shoulders and back. Studies show that thinking or talking about a stressful event increases tension in the back muscles of those with chronic back pain. When stress is chronic, muscles are often in a constant state of tension. This tension can lead to other pain, such as headaches and migraines.

Pain signals

The brain is constantly trying to inhibit pain signals, especially if a chronic pain condition is present. However, when a person is stressed, the brain’s ability to hinder those signals is reduced, which increases pain.

Inflammatory response

When stress is experienced, the immune system’s inflammatory response is activated. This inflammation can cause pain, especially with chronic pain conditions sensitive to inflammation, such as arthritis.

Perception

Stress can also increase the perception of pain. When dealing with stressors, the perception of pain may become more intense and overwhelming.

Coping tools

Relaxation techniques (yoga, meditation, breathing exercises, etc.), practicing good sleep hygiene, or seeing a mental health professional, such as a pain psychologist or psychiatrist, can decrease stress, and therefore, reduce pain. These practices can boost mood and improve daily function in those with chronic pain conditions.

Article Provided By: PainScale

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If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
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