fbpx
0

Femoral Neuropathy

Femoral Neuropathy

What is femoral neuropathy?

Femoral neuropathy, or femoral nerve dysfunction, occurs when you can’t move or feel part of your leg because of damaged nerves, specifically the femoral nerve. This can result from an injury, prolonged pressure on the nerve, or damage from disease. In most cases, this condition will go away without treatment. However, medications and physical therapy may be necessary if symptoms don’t improve.

What causes femoral neuropathy?

The femoral nerve is one of the largest nerves in your leg. It’s located near the groin and controls the muscles that help straighten your leg and move your hips. It also provides feeling in the lower part of your leg and the front of your thigh. Because of where it’s located, damage to the femoral nerve is uncommon relative to neuropathies caused by damage to other nerves. When the femoral nerve is damaged, it affects your ability to walk and may cause problems with sensation in your leg and foot. View the femoral nerve on this BodyMap of the femur.

Damage to the femoral nerve can be the result of:

  • a direct injury
  • a tumor or other growth blocking or trapping part of your nerve
  • prolonged pressure on the nerve, such as from prolonged immobilization
  • a pelvic fracture
  • radiation to the pelvis
  • hemorrhage or bleeding into the space behind the abdomen, which is called the retroperitoneal space
  • a catheter placed into the femoral artery, which is necessary for certain surgical procedures

Diabetes may cause femoral neuropathy. Diabetes can cause widespread nerve damage due to fluctuations in blood sugar and blood pressure. Nerve damage that affects your legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms is known as peripheral neuropathy. There is currently some debate about whether femoral neuropathy is truly a peripheral neuropathy or a form of diabetic amyotrophy.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), diabetes is the most common reason for peripheral neuropathy in people who’ve had diabetes for at least 25 years.

Signs of femoral neuropathy

This nerve condition can lead to difficulties moving around. Your leg or knee might feel weak, and you may be unable to put pressure on the affected leg.

You might also feel unusual sensations in your legs. They include:

  • numbness in any part of the leg (typically the front and inside of the thigh, but potentially all the way down to the feet)
  • tingling in any part of the leg
  • dull aching pain in the genital region
  • lower extremity muscle weakness
  • difficulty extending the knee due to quadriceps weakness
  • feeling like your leg or knee is going to give out (buckle) on you
How serious is it?

Prolonged pressure placed on the femoral nerve can prevent blood from flowing in the affected area. The decreased blood flow can result in tissue damage.

If your nerve damage is the result of an injury, it may be possible that your femoral vein or artery is also damaged. This could cause dangerous internal bleeding. The femoral artery is a very large artery that lies close to the femoral nerve. Trauma often damages both at the same time. Injury to the artery or bleeding from the artery can cause compression on the nerve.

Additionally, the femoral nerve provides sensation to a major portion of the leg. This loss of sensation can lead to injuries. Having weak leg muscles can make you more prone to falling. Falls are of particular concern in older adults because they can cause hip fractures, which are very serious injuries.

 

Diagnosing femoral neuropathy

Initial tests

To diagnose femoral neuropathy and its cause, your doctor will perform a comprehensive physical exam and ask questions about recent injuries or surgeries, as well as questions about your medical history.

To look for weakness, they will test specific muscles that receive sensation from the femoral nerve. Your doctor will probably check your knee reflexes and ask about changes in feeling in the front part of the thigh and the middle part of the leg. The goal of the evaluation is to determine whether the weakness involves only the femoral nerve or if other nerves also contribute.

Additional testing might include:

Nerve conduction

Nerve conduction checks the speed of electrical impulses in your nerves. An abnormal response, such as a slow time for electrical signals to travel through your nerves, usually indicates damage to the nerve in question.

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) should be performed after the nerve conduction test to see how well your muscles and nerves are working. This test records the electrical activity present in your muscles when the nerves that lead to them are active. The EMG will determine whether the muscle responds appropriately to stimulation. Certain medical conditions cause muscles to fire on their own, which is an abnormality that an EMG can reveal. Because nerves stimulate and control your muscles, the test can identify problems with both muscles and nerves.

MRI and CT scans

An MRI scan can look for tumors, growths, or any other masses in the area of the femoral nerve that could cause compression on the nerve. MRI scans use radio waves and magnets to produce a detailed image of the part of your body that is being scanned.

A CT scan can also look for vascular or bone growths.

Treatment options

The first step in treating femoral neuropathy is dealing with the underlying condition or cause. If compression on the nerve is the cause, the goal will be to relieve the compression. Occasionally in mild injuries, such as mild compression or a stretch injury, the problem may resolve spontaneously. For people with diabetes, bringing blood sugar levels back to normal may alleviate nerve dysfunction. If your nerve doesn’t improve on its own, you’ll need treatment. This usually involves medications and physical therapy.

Medications

You might have corticosteroid injections in your leg to reduce inflammation and get rid of any swelling that occurs. Pain medications can help relieve any pain and discomfort. For neuropathic pain, your doctor may prescribe medications, such as gabapentin, pregabalin, or amitriptyline.

Therapy

Physical therapy can help build up the strength in your leg muscles again. A physical therapist will teach you exercises to strengthen and stretch your muscles. Undergoing physical therapy helps to reduce pain and promote mobility.

You might need to use an orthopedic device, such as a brace, to assist you with walking. Usually, a knee brace is helpful in preventing knee buckling.

Depending on how severe the nerve damage is and how much trouble you’re having moving around, you might also need occupational therapy. This type of therapy helps you learn to do regular tasks like bathing and other self-care activities. These are called “activities of daily living.” Your doctor might also recommend vocational counseling if your condition forces you to find another line of work.

Surgery

Your doctor might recommend surgery if you have a growth blocking your femoral nerve. Removing the growth will relieve the pressure on your nerve.

Long-term outlook after treatment

You might be able to heal fully after you treat the underlying condition. If the treatment isn’t successful or if the femoral nerve damage is severe, you might permanently lose feeling in that part of your leg or the ability to move it.

Tips to prevent nerve damage

You can lower your risk of femoral neuropathy caused by diabetes by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. This helps protect your nerves from damage caused by this disease. Preventive measures would be directed at each cause. Talk to your doctor for advice about what preventive measures would be the best for you.

Maintaining an active lifestyle helps to keep your leg muscles strong and improve stability.

Last medically reviewed on September 13, 2017

 

Article Provided ByHealthline

 

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
0
Nerve Pain Therapy, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Calmare Scrambler, Chronic Pain Therapy, Neuropathic Pain Therapy, Greenville SC

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Dysfunction in the sacroiliac joint is thought to cause low back pain and/or leg pain. The leg pain can be particularly difficult and may feel similar to sciatica or pain caused by a lumbar disc herniation. The sacroiliac joint lies next to the bottom of the spine, below the lumbar spine and above the tailbone (coccyx). It connects the sacrum (the triangular bone at the bottom of the spine) with the pelvis (iliac crest).

The joint typically has the following characteristics:

  • Small and very strong, reinforced by strong ligaments that surround it
  • Does not have much motion
  • Transmits all the forces of the upper body to the pelvis (hips) and legs
  • Acts as a shock-absorbing structure

Symptoms

The most common symptoms for patients are lower back pain and the following sensations in the lower extremity: pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, pelvis/buttock pain, hip/groin pain, feeling of leg instability (buckling, giving way), disturbed sleep patterns, disturbed sitting patterns (unable to sit for long periods, sitting on one side), pain going from sitting to standing.


Causes and Risk Factors

While it is not clear how the pain is caused, it is thought that an alteration in the normal joint motion may be the culprit that causes sacroiliac pain. This source of pain can be caused by either:

Too much movement (hypermobility or instability): The pain is typically felt in the lower back and/or hip and may radiate into the groin area.

Too little movement (hypomobility or fixation): The pain is typically felt on one side of the lower back or buttocks and can radiate down the leg. The pain usually remains above the knee, but at times pain can extend to the ankle or foot. The pain is similar to sciatica — or pain that radiates down the sciatic nerve — and is caused by a radiculopathy.

Diagnosis

Accurately diagnosing sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be difficult because the symptoms mimic other common conditions, including other mechanical back pain conditions like facet syndrome and lumbar spine conditions including disc herniation and radiculopathy (pain along the sciatic nerve that radiates down the leg). A diagnosis is usually arrived at through physical examination (eliminating other causes) and/or an injection (utilized to block the pain).

Treatments

Treatments for sacroiliac joint dysfunction are usually conservative (meaning nonsurgical) and focus on trying to restore normal motion in the joint:

  • Ice, heat and rest.
  • Medications: acetaminophen, as well as anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen or naproxen) to reduce the swelling that is usually contributing to the patient’s pain.
  • Manual manipulation provided by a chiropractor, osteopathic doctor or other qualified health practitioner may help. This can be highly effective when the sacroiliac joint is fixated or “stuck.” It may be irritating if the sacroiliac joint is hypermobile. The manipulation is accomplished through a number of methods, including (but not limited to): side-posture manipulation, drop technique, blocking techniques and instrument-guided methods.
  • Supports or braces for when the sacroiliac joint is “hypermobile,” or too loose.
  • Controlled, gradual physical therapy may be helpful to strengthen the muscles around the sacroiliac joint and appropriately increase range of motion. In addition, any type of gentle, low-impact aerobic exercise will help increase the flow of blood to the area, which in turn stimulates a healing response. For severe pain, water therapy may be an option, as the water provides buoyancy for the body and reduces stress on the painful joint.
  • Sacroiliac joint injections.

When these treatments fail, surgery may be offered. In surgery, one or both of the sacroiliac joints may be fused with the goal of eliminating any abnormal motion.

Article Provided By: Cedars-Sinai

0

Sciatica

Six sciatica stretches for pain relief

If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works.

Sciatica itself is not a condition, but a very uncomfortable symptom of many potential problems in the back, pelvis, and hip.

People with sciatica often experience pain running through the buttocks and down the back of the leg. However, it does not have to originate in the back; it can be caused by an injury to the pelvis or hip, or from direct pressure to the sciatic nerve.

The pain can be mild or so severe that a person with sciatica may have trouble standing, sitting, or even sleeping. There is a range of treatments for sciatica, including many stretches that may help to ease the pain.

Overview
People with sciatica can experience pain that makes it difficult for them to sit or stand.

The sciatic nerve is a nerve that originates in the lower back on either side of the spine. It runs through the buttocks and into the hips before branching down each leg.

This nerve is the longest nerve in the body and provides sensation to the outer leg and foot.

Sciatica itself is not an injury or disease. Instead, sciatica refers to a symptom of any number of problems.

Sciatica is nerve pain that runs through the buttocks, down the back of the leg and into the ankle or foot.

Some people that have sciatica describe the pain as shooting, sharp, or burning. They may experience weakness in the affected leg. The pain may worsen with sudden movements, such as coughing.

Stretches for pain relief

Certain stretches may provide some relief for people experiencing sciatica-related pain.

Anecdotally, most people with sciatica do find stretching helps relieve pain. However, people with sciatica should speak to a doctor before doing any sciatica stretches to avoid further injury.

A doctor or physical therapist may recommend that people perform several of these stretches each day:

  • knees to chest
  • cobra or modified cobra
  • seated hip stretch
  • standing hamstring stretch
  • seated spinal twist
  • knee to shoulder

Follow these simple instructions to perform these stretches for sciatica pain relief:

If any of these exercises make the sciatica worse, stop immediately. It is normal to feel stretching during these movements, however it is not normal for the sciatic pain to increase.

Treatment

As well as stretching, some people who experience sciatica symptoms also try other home remedies to ease their pain and discomfort.

Other home remedies include the following:

  • Ice: Icing the area for 20 minutes several times a day for the first two to three days after the pain begins.
  • Heat: Using heat on the area after the first few days.
  • Anti-inflammatories: Taking anti-inflammatory medications to ease the pain. Ibuprofen is available for purchase over-the-counter or online.

Anyone that experiences sciatica for longer than a month should seek medical attention. Additionally, any person that has severe sciatica should seek medical care as soon as possible.

Treatment for an individual’s sciatica largely depends on what is causing the pain.

Some common causes of sciatica include the following:

  • herniated disc or one of the rubbery cushions between the spinal bones slipping out of place
  • a narrowing of the spinal cord that puts pressure on the lumbar spine known as lumbar spinal stenosis
  • a progressive disease that wears away the cushions in the spinal column known as degenerative disk disease
  • pregnancy
  • other injuries to the back that put excess pressure on the sciatic nerve
Prevention

It is not always possible to prevent sciatica. However, some lifestyle modifications can significantly help reduce a person’s risk of experiencing sciatica again.

In general, regular exercise and building a strong core may help prevent sciatica. Additionally maintaining a good posture while sitting and standing is important, and may make people less likely to develop sciatica than people with poor posture.

Article Provided By: medicalnewstoday

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Psychological

Psychological Impacts of Chronic Pain

When it comes to the topic of living with chronic pain, the focus is generally on its impact on the body—the back, the knees or the shoulders. But chronic pain has a significant impact on your mental health as well.

More and more research indicates that pain, especially when dealt with for long periods of time, can lead to a host of psychological effects. This means it can be classified as a neurological condition. Research indicates that nearly half of those dealing with chronic pain face depression at some point. Left untreated, depression related to chronic pain can become more complex and more difficult to overcome.

What are the psychological impacts of chronic pain?

Living with pain can lead to a host of additional mental health problems, including:

  • Depression: One of the most common thoughts expressed by those in chronic pain is, “Will I ever feel better?” Dealing with pain day after day can lead to a sense of hopelessness. If ignored, these feelings can magnify and make physical and emotional recovery more difficult. For many, chronic pain leads to a great loss of enjoyment and functional abilities in everyday life.
  • Anxiety and stress: People living with chronic pain think about the pain often throughout the day. Patients can begin to focus too much energy on their painful symptoms. Concerns over health and well-being begin to overwhelm their coping strategies. They begin to obsess about their reduced function levels, health care burdens, and ultimately on their ability to keep their jobs, pay their bills and support their families.
  • Moodiness and irritability: The challenges of coping with physical pain and anxiety can lead to more erratic or unstable behavior.  A common symptom reported is increased impatience and anger. People around them notice that they have a “short fuse.” These emotions are natural. Living with chronic pain is difficult and makes people feel more on edge, which can have negative impacts on both personal and professional relationships.
  • Decreased cognitive function: Have you ever tried to concentrate when you have a headache? Imagine living with that kind of pain every day. It takes a toll on your ability to focus and remember things.
  • Insomnia and fatigue: Chronic pain can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. This creates a vicious cycle. Lack of restful sleep impedes your body’s ability to heal and think clearly. The lack of sleep, combined with reduced activity and increased anxiety, often leads to more restless sleep—and increased fatigue.
  • Sexual dysfunction: Chronic pain can make sexual activity difficult in several ways.  Pain increases stress, anxiety, insomnia and depression, all of which reduce sexual drive and cause some people to lose interest in sex all together. Also, for many the physical act of sex can increase pain, so they avoid it. The reduction in libido and reduced sexual activity can have a significant impact, both physical and emotional, on relationships and intimacy.

All of these factors contribute to a decline in quality of life. This can exacerbate the emotional aspects of living with daily pain. For example, when we a miss a family event because of pain, we become depressed, angry and irritable. So it is critical to address the psychological effects of pain in coordination with treating the physical aspects of it.

Addressing the Psychological Effects of Chronic Pain

Chronic pain is exhausting, both physically and mentally. The body expends a great deal of energy trying to heal, while the brain works overtime trying to process the pain signals. Your interventional pain specialist can address the physical injuries that are causing chronic pain. But if you are suffering from depression, anxiety, insomnia, reduced libido, or other concerns in your emotional life, you should communicate them to your doctor. He or she will likely recommend a number of mental health interventions, including:

  • Biofeedback: This technique helps you learn how to control your body’s reactions to pain and stress. By learning how to relax tight muscles and breathe deeply you can refocus your brain and gain greater control over your body’s reaction to pain.
  • Cognitive therapy: Working with a mental health professional, you will have the opportunity to talk about your feelings and fears. The goal is to raise your awareness of inaccurate or negative thinking so you can reframe those ideas and emotions to deal with them in a more positive and healthy way.
  • Exercise: Although it is often difficult to think of exercising while in pain, gentle body movement can be helpful and lead to the release of endorphins, the body’s “feel good” hormones. Non-impact exercise, such as swimming, yoga, Pilates and stretching can be beneficial to the body and mind.
  • Massage therapy: A soothing massage offers both physical and psychological benefits. It relieves muscle tension and stiffness and increases blood flow to encourage healing of injured tissues. It also stimulates the release of endorphins to reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Medications: In some cases, prescription antidepressants, sleep medications or anxiety medications may be appropriate. This is something you should discuss with your pain specialist, who may work with an outside specialist or your primary care doctor to address your symptoms with medications.

Early Diagnosis is Key

As is the case with all medical conditions, it is important to recognize and diagnose the psychological effects of chronic pain early. This begins when both patient and physician agree that there is an issue with mood that needs to be addressed—in addition to pain. A plan can be established to treat you as a whole person, treating both the physical and the mental aspects of chronic pain.

 

Remember, if you are suffering from chronic pain, there is hope! It is possible to overcome the psychological impacts of this pain. Be honest with your pain management specialist. They are very familiar with all of the consequences of dealing with pain and will develop a plan to support your entire well-being, from head to toe.

Article Provided By: Advanced Medical Group

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Top Pain Management Techniques

Bodily pain that lasts more than 12 weeks is defined as chronic pain. This differs from recurring pain, wherein an individual suffers shorter bouts of pain on a consistent basis. Both chronic pain and recurring pain can be life-altering and have an adverse effect on mood, happiness, and general quality of life. While diagnosing and treating the underlying condition is a good step toward reducing pain, other pain management techniques may offer relief. From exercise to biofeedback, people should know there are options for managing their pain.

1. Cold and heat

Heat therapy and cold therapy are two of the best simple and inexpensive pain management options. Heat therapy involves applying heat to the affected area; this improves circulation and blood flow. Depending on the condition, dry heat, such as heating pads, or moist heat, such as a steamed towel, may prove more beneficial. Conversely, cold therapy reduces inflammation and swelling by reducing blood flow to the target area.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

2. Yoga

Yoga is an ancient physical, mental, and spiritual practice that combines mindfulness with breathing exercises and gentle motions. Gently raising the heart rate can release endorphins that help moderate pain, as does the increase in oxygen, which also enhances mood. Physically, stretching helps reduce pain held in the muscles and joints.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

3. Exercise

Gentle exercise such as taking a brisk walk, going for a swim, or riding a bicycle can ease pain. Exercising releases endorphins that elevate mood and block pain on a molecular level. These practices also strengthen the muscles, which reduces pain and prevents re-injury in the long run.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

4. Meditation

Meditation is a mindfulness activity that requires the individual to calm and center him or herself through deep breathing and focus. The practice can elevate mood, increase energy, and help ground oneself. Studies also show that meditation and deep breathing have a positive effect on pain. Meditation releases unconscious tension and tightness that are common sources of pain.

Peripheral Neuropathy, Pain Relief, Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

5. Physical therapy

Regular sessions with a licensed physical therapist can greatly reduce pain. Physical therapists will aim to treat the pain as well as the underlying source. Physical therapy sessions consist of light aerobic exercise, stretching, and strength training. Therapists may also utilize tools such as heating pads, ice packs, and massage.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

6. Massage

While many people think of a massage as part of a trip to the spa, therapeutic massage can be a useful tool for pain management in addition to relaxation. Massage releases mental stress and eases muscle tension. Although massage typically targets neck and back pain, evidence suggests it is beneficial to all types of pain, and therapists are often well-versed in treating the whole body.

Peripheral Neuropathy, Back Pain Relief, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

7. Avoid alcohol and smoking

Pain often makes falling asleep and staying asleep difficult. A lack of sleep can contribute to pain, creating a vicious cycle. While alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep faster, it does nothing to improve the quality of your sleep, and you’ll often feel exhausted the next day; this is because alcohol blocks the deep, restorative REM sleep we need. Smoking worsens circulation, which can contribute to chronic pain.

Nerve Pain Therapy, Neuropathy Treatment, Neck Pain Relief, Diabetic Neuropathy Treatment, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

8. Occupational therapy

Different from physical therapy, occupational therapy involves learning and applying daily behaviors that will not aggravate the chronic pain. For example, if a person suffers from neck pain that makes it difficult to sit in front of a computer all day, an occupational therapist can suggest modifications and exercises to improve the situation. Occupational therapy is often used in conjunction with physical therapy to get the best results.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

9. Acupuncture

Acupuncture is the ancient practice of stimulating pressure points on the body to achieve specific results. While scientific inquiry into the health benefits of acupuncture is ongoing, much of the evidence suggests acupuncture is an efficient way to treat pain. Acupuncture works by activating the body’s self-healing mechanisms and can be useful in treating lower back pain, neck pain, knee pain, and osteoarthritis. It may also help with chronic migraines.

Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Relief, Chemotherapy, Peripheral, CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10. Biofeedback

Biofeedback is a therapy that helps control the body’s involuntary responses to pain. Electrodes take various readings such as heart and breathing rate, blood pressure, and skin temperature. The biofeedback therapist then takes the patient through relaxation exercises that help regulate these functions and ultimately positively affect pain.

Pain Management, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Chronic Pain, Pain Center, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Article Provided By: FactyHealth

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Pressure on the median nerve – the central nerve that connects to the hand – causes carpal tunnel syndrome. In carpal tunnel patients, it causes pain and lack of function in the hand when squeezed. People whose work requires repetitive hand movements often experience this disorder. For example, people who work on computers and hair stylists commonly experience carpal tunnel syndrome. Pregnant women are also highly susceptible. A wrist splint or exercises can ease symptoms in the early days, however, in advanced cases surgery is necessary.

1. Pins and Needles

Everyone recognizes the tingling sensation known as pins and needles. This easily happens to someone who stays in an awkward position without moving hands and legs over a period. In these cases, the feeling is no more than a slight irritant, but with carpal tunnel syndrome, the sensation is far more intense and unpleasant. Usually, it only affects the thumb and fingers, but it can also spread to other areas.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

2. Pain

Even in the early stages, carpal tunnel syndrome can be extremely painful. The pain is usually in the hands and fingers, however, in severe cases it may travel through the arm to the shoulder. Pain patterns vary from patient to patient. Doctors are continuously researching to understand more about carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

3. Numbness in the fingertips

Carpal tunnel syndrome may cause loss of feeling in the fingers. The fingers may feel very little to no sensation at all. As a result, patients may be unable to complete normal day to day tasks. Surgical treatment is usually necessary to restore sensation and function. However, exercise and home treatment may be enough in some cases.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

4. Sensation of swelling

Quite regularly people with carpal tunnel syndrome feel as though their hands or fingers have become swollen. When the doctor checks them, they find no evidence of swelling, but patients continue to feel that sensation. Minor swelling may occur above the wrist at times in carpal tunnel syndrome. However, most patients report the feeling in the fingers, localized to where the numbness occurs.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

5. Hands feel weak

One of the most common carpal tunnel syndrome feelings is a sense of hands that have lost their power. In particular, people claim that they find it harder to grip small objects and this causes many breakages in the kitchen. Medical tests do not reveal any marked loss of hand power in these cases, so doctors remain uncertain why so many patients feel this way. However, some slight deterioration in grip control may happen after surgical treatment.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

6. Responds to changes in wrist movements

People with carpal tunnel syndrome often find that they can get relief by moving their hand into a different position. Symptoms are usually worse at night – presumably because of fewer hand movements. In the most severe cases, the symptoms might be so intense that they disturb sleep and cause night waking.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

7. A condition that worsens over time

Carpel tunnel syndrome worsens with time, especially if symptoms go ignored and untreated. Surgery is usually necessary for the later stages of the condition. Early detection is best, as treatment is quite simple in the early stages. Wrist splints and exercise are usually enough to relieve symptoms in the early stages.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

8. Skin color changes

A certain number of people might notice changes in the color of the skin of their hand as a consequence of this condition. Sometimes the skin could become dry. Tingling and numbness feelings in their hand is also a good indication that they might have carpal tunnel syndrome. This is especially likely to be the case if they also feel that their fingertips have become frigid.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

9. Stiffness of the fingers

Some carpal tunnel syndrome patients complain that they feel as though their fingers are very stiff. However, when the doctor examines them, they fail to find any evidence to support this feeling. If the patient’s fingers actually have become stiff, it’s likely they are experiencing rheumatic or arthritic condition.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

10. Like the twang of a rubber band

One of the strangest feelings associated with carpal tunnel syndrome is in response to a certain hand movement. People say they sense something comparable to the twang of a released rubber band in their hand and fingers. Nobody is sure what exactly causes them to have this feeling. In particular, patients report this happening after they have had surgery performed.

Carpal Tunnel, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Peripheral Neuropathy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

Article Provided By: FactyHealth

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Pain Center, Pain Management, Nerve Pain Therapy, Pain Relief

How to Sleep Well Despite Chronic Pain

Chronic pain and insomnia are an unhealthy combination. According to the National Sleep Foundation, chronic pain disturbs the slumber of one in five Americans at least a few nights a week. Whether it’s from a bad back, arthritis, or headaches, chronic pain puts you in double jeopardy: the pain robs you of restful sleep and makes you more fatigued, and thus more sensitive to pain.

But you can start to break this vicious cycle.

“For chronic pain conditions, what you need is good sleeping habits from the beginning — things that will last,” says Dr. Padma Gulur, a pain medicine specialist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. That means relying on the brain’s natural sleep drive as much as possible.

Try “relaxing distraction”

Dr. Gulur recommends “relaxing distraction” to her patients. Some relaxation techniques use basic rhythmic breathing meditation; others focus on guided imagery, in which you imagine being in a calm, peaceful location. Find something that appeals to you and helps you fall asleep. You might look for these exercises on CD, or consider group or individual trainings or sleep education sessions.

Getting back to sleep

For some people, chronic pain not only makes it harder to fall asleep, but can also interrupt sleep. Simply shifting position in bed can trigger pain from a back condition or arthritic knee.

One approach is to take your pain medication right before bed. Check with your doctor to be sure that fits into your treatment plan. If pain does wake you in the middle of the night, first try meditation, visualization, or whatever relaxing distraction you favor. But if it doesn’t work, getting up to read a book in a quiet room with low light can help you to get back to sleep. Avoid loud sounds and bright light (that means TVs, smartphones, tablets, and computers).

Staying on a regular sleep schedule is also important. Go to bed at the same time every night and, no matter how the night goes, rise the next day at the same time and remain awake until your planned sleep time. This helps to set your internal sleep clock and enhances the natural sleep drive.

Article Provided By: Harvard Health Publishing

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina, Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms and Causes of CRPS

Following an injury or surgery, even something as simple as a sprained ankle, some people begin experiencing intense pain that seems to spread from the injury and makes the entire limb feel on fire or as if electrical shocks are running up and down the area. Often, doctors diagnose these individuals with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a condition for which there are many causes and symptoms.

1. What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Complex regional pain syndrome is a rare condition that can occur after surgery, stroke, heart attack, or an injury. It is thought to be an unusual autoimmune response to the trauma. Unfortunately, this pain is often more impactful than the injury or preceding illness itself.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler Center, Greenville South Carolina

2. What Causes Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Complex regional pain syndrome is believed to be caused by the malfunction of, or from damage to, the peripheral and central nervous systems, combined with the immune response. The pain causes the immune system to overreact, resulting in swelling and stiffness in the affected joints. The initial cause is the trauma, which leads to a cascade of events resulting in complex regional pain syndrome.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

3. How Long Does Complex Regional Pain Syndrom Last?

Complex regional pain syndrome is often a chronic condition lasting more than six months. You may experience symptoms for a while and go into remission, only to have the condition flare up again at a later date. CRPS will affect some people just once and never again, while others are in constant pain and need treatment regularly.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Back Pain Relief, Pain Relief, Nerve Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

4. What are the Symptoms of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Complex regional pain syndrome manifests itself in several ways. You may feel constant dull or severe pain, or feel electric shocks or “pins and needles”; others describe the pain as burning and intense. Some people with CRPS have difficulty moving the affected limb, or the pain may travel to the opposite limb, as well. You may experience sweating in the affected area, where the skin may appear thin and shiny. Some people notice changes to hair and nail growth patterns and have tremors or jerking in the limb. Lastly, the affected limb may change color, becoming purple, red, blue, blotchy, or pale.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Nerve Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

5. How Does a Doctor Diagnose Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

There is no one test that definitively diagnoses complex regional pain syndrome. Instead, your doctor will look at your past case history and your symptoms and make an evaluation. He or she may run tests to rule out other diseases since the symptoms of complex regional pain syndrome mimic other diseases with different treatments.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

6. Are There Different Types of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

There are two types of complex regional pain syndrome: type 1 and type 2. Most people (90 percent) have type 1 complex regional pain syndrome. Also called reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or RSD, it occurs following trauma that did not damage the nerves. Type 2 or causalgia occurs when the trauma damages the nerves.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Management, Chronic Pain, Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

7. Complications of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

If you fail to receive treatment for CRPS, you could experience severe complications including atrophy and muscle contraction. Atrophy causes your muscles, skin, and bones deteriorate due to lack of use. Affected extremities become weakened to the point where they cannot be used at all. Alternatively, your muscles may begin to contract, fixing the injured body part in one position, again rendering the limb unusable.

 

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Chronic Pain, Pain Therapy, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

8. How is Complex Regional Pain Syndrom Treated?

There are many options for treating complex regional pain syndrome. Your doctor may prescribe physical therapy, medications, and psychotherapy. You may find some relief from sympathetic nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation, neurostimulation, intrathecal drug pumps, or Graded Motor imagery. Some people find alternative therapies helpful and turn to acupuncture, chiropractic, and biofeedback for relief. Other modalities that work toward relaxing the limb include behavior modification, relaxation techniques, progressive muscle relaxation, and guided motion therapy.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

9. Who is At Risk of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

Complex regional pain syndrome may affect anyone at any age, but the median age is 40. Children and adults younger than 30 have been known to develop CRPS. Women seem to develop the condition more than men, but men can get it, too. Anyone who has had an injury is at risk, especially if the injury affects the extremities.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Nerve Pain Relief, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

10. What is the Prognosis for Recovery from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome?

The earlier CRPS is diagnosed and treated, the better the prognosis. Younger people, especially those under the age of 20 are more likely to recover from complex regional pain syndrome than older individuals. However, the disorder is different for everyone and some people deal with chronic pain and disability, even with treatment.

CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain Relief, Pain Therapy, Pain Management, Carolina Pain Scrambler, Greenville South Carolina

Article Provided By: FactyHealth

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Peripheral Neuropathy, Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Relief, Pain therapy

When Your Pain Is Disabling

Pain can entirely change our lives. Ongoing pain problems can lead to disabilities like not being able to work, drive, or even maintain a home. Pain in a dominant hand or arm can make it difficult to button a shirt, comb hair, or carry groceries. Lower back pain can make it hard to sit, stand, bend, tie shoelaces, or just about anything else you can imagine. Intense, recurring headaches, like migraines, can make it difficult to concentrate, listen, read, eat, or even turn the lights on. When your pain is disabling – it is called high-impact chronic pain. Research done on high-impact chronic pain by groups like the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health have published some important findings:

  • Approximately 10.6 million Americans, or 4.8% of the population, have high-impact chronic pain.
  • Disability is typically more commonly associated with chronic pain than with a number of other chronic conditions, including stroke and kidney failure.
  • Those with high-impact chronic pain reported higher levels of mental health problems and cognitive problems, compared to those with chronic pain without disability.
  • High-impact patients reported greater difficulty performing daily self-care activity and greater healthcare utilization.

These findings suggest that an awful lot of folks are not only living with intense pain, but also experiencing life-altering limitations as a result.

When pain becomes this overwhelming, pain management becomes a far bigger challenge. Finding the best pain relief strategies while also exploring ways of engaging more with daily activities can seem like a daunting task. How can you reduce the effect that pain has on your life without undoing all the hard work you have put in to get the pain under better control?

For starters, I think it helps to focus on only a couple of tasks at a time. What function or activity would be most meaningful to have back in your life? For example, becoming just a bit more mobile can mean the difference between spending more time with friends or missing out, and being able to cook a prized recipe once again will delight all who get to enjoy it with you. Consider consulting with an occupational therapist that typically specialize in helping patients hone in skills that boost their ability to perform home or work activities.

It isn’t easy to do any activity that you haven’t done in a while. There is a good chance that being in pain has caused important muscles groups to get deconditioned and stiff, and overdoing it too quickly will only set off the pain. But building back up a strong foundation or core that can help support your arms, legs, and spine as they become more active helps prevent overstressing them. Working with a physical therapist or exercise expert can help you find ways to recondition key muscle groups and build up more foundational or core stability, so you can do more with less pain. Diminishing the impact of pain is a much taller order than getting physically stronger. Research has taught us that those living with high-impact chronic pain often experience psychological distress and mood disorders like depression and anxiety. It is hard to function when you feel overwhelmed, so try to get involved in practices that can bring a sense of calm – meditation, yoga, breathing exercises, enjoying nature, or seeing a counselor all have the potential to help. If you are suffering from a challenging chronic pain problem and feel you and your doctors have done your best to manage the symptoms, consider having a conversation with your healthcare team about how you might be able to lessen the impact that your pain has on your life.
Article Provided By: WebMD

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
Carpal Tunnel, Nerve Pain Therapy, Pain Relief, CIPN, Greenville, South Carolina

Good Friend to Someone in Chronic Pain

Being a Good Friend to Someone with Chronic Pain

Many individuals experience acute or chronic pain at some point in their life. Many that suffer from chronic pain can go years without finding the appropriate relief which leads to extended discomfort, depression, and a sense of loneliness.

Chronic pain affects everyone surrounding the actual sufferer. Frustration and exhaustion can consume the sufferer making it difficult to even get through the day. Many suffers don’t see how their emotions and attitude are being inflicted on others around them. Lifestyle changes alter the relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. If you have no direct experience with chronic pain, you might not able to relate adding additional stress and anxiety to their life.

Listed below are a few tips to help someone with chronic pain:

  • Ask to attend their appointments or therapy sessions. You will be able to relate and discuss their pain.
  • Educate yourself. With medical research and their history of chronic pain.
  • Don’t feel sorry for yourself. The sufferer doesn’t want to burden you or be in a constant foul mood. Try putting yourself in their shoes. Treasure your relationship!
  • Offer a lending hand. Help clean their house, drive them to the grocery store, or any other chore.
  • Listen. At times they just want to be heard!
  • Accept Cancellations. Sufferers like to be included even if they regularly cancel.
  • Limit talking about their pain. Distract yourselves with hobbies that interest you both.
  • Be supportive. Learn and teach them how to be mentally and physically independent.
  • Be sensitive and positive. Criticism, stress, and conflict increases pain. Avoid questioning the sufferer’s pain this can hurt them and your relationship.
  • Remember to take care of yourself. Take time out to recharge. Research indicates spouses of those dealing with chronic pain show increased weakened immune system, withdrawal, discouragement, loneliness, and deteriorating physical health. It can be helpful to better understand how to care for your loved one while always remembering to take care of yourself.

Article Provided By: PainScale

Carolina Pain Scrambler Logo, Chronic Pain, Greenville, SC
If you would like to discuss what Carolina Pain Scrambler do to help relieve your chronic pain symptoms or receive more information on our treatment process, please do not hesitate to call us at 864-520-5011 or you can email us at info@carolinapainscrambler.com
1 2 3 4